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1 - 10 of 95 results for: AA

AA 47SI: Why Go To Space?

Why do we spend billions of dollars exploring space? What can modern policymakers, entrepreneurs, and industrialists do to help us achieve our goals beyond planet Earth? Whether it is the object of exploration, science, civilization, or conquest, few domains have captured the imagination of a species like space. This course is an introduction to space policy issues, with an emphasis on the modern United States. We will present a historical overview of space programs from all around the world, and then spend the last five weeks discussing present policy issues, through lectures and guest speakers from NASA, the Department of Defense, new and legacy space industry companies, and more. Students will present on one issue that piques their interest, selecting from various domains including commercial concerns, military questions, and geopolitical considerations.
Last offered: Spring 2018

AA 93: Building Trust in Autonomy

Preparatory course for Bing Overseas Studies summer course in Edinburgh. Prerequisite: Requires instructor consent.
Last offered: Spring 2018

AA 100: Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics

This class introduces the basics of aeronautics and astronautics through applied physics, hands-on activities, and real world examples. The principles of fluid flow, flight, and propulsion for aircraft will be illustrated, including the creation of lift and drag, aerodynamic performance including takeoff, climb, range, and landing. The principles of orbits, maneuvers, space environment, and propulsion for spacecraft will be illustrated. Students will be exposed to the history and challenges of aeronautics and astronautics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

AA 102: Introduction to Applied Aerodynamics

This course explores the fundamentals of the behavior of aerodynamic surfaces (airfoils, wings, bodies) immersed in a fluid across all speed regimes (from subsonic to supersonic/hypersonic). We will cover airfoil theory (subsonic and supersonic), wing theory, and introduction to viscous flows and both laminar and turbulent boundary layers, and the topic of flow transition. At the completion of this course, students will be able to understand and predict the forces and movements generated by aerodynamic configurations of interest. Assignments require a basic introductory knowledge of MATLAB or another suitable programming language. Prerequisites: CME 100 and CME 102 (or equivalent), PHYS 41, AA 100, and AA 101 or ME 70.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

AA 103: Air and Space Propulsion

This course is designed to introduce the student to fundamental concepts of air-breathing and rocket propulsion including advanced concepts for space propulsion. Topics: the physical mechanisms of thrust creation and the parameters used to characterize propulsion system performance; comparison of airbreathing engine cycles; introduction to chemical rockets; multistage launch systems; plasmas and electric propulsion; solar sails and laser assisted propulsion. Prerequisites: AA 100, ENGR 30, and ME 70 (or equivalent).
Last offered: Spring 2019

AA 108N: Surviving Space

Space is dangerous. Anything we put into orbit has to survive the intense forces experienced during launch, extreme temperature changes, impacts by cosmic rays and energetic protons and electrons, as well as hits by human-made orbital debris and meteoroids. If we venture beyond Earth's sphere of influence, we must also then endure the extreme plasma environment without the protection of our magnetic field. With all of these potential hazards, it is remarkable that our space program has experienced so few catastrophic failures. In this seminar, students will learn how engineers design and test spacecraft to ensure survivability in this harsh space environment. We will explore three different space environment scenarios, including a small satellite that must survive in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), a large spacecraft headed to rendezvous with an asteroid, and a human spaceflight mission to Mars.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

AA 109Q: Aerodynamics of Race Cars

Almost as soon as cars had been invented, races of various kinds were organized. In all its forms (open-wheel, touring car, sports car, production-car, one-make, stock car, etc.), car racing is today a very popular sport with a huge media coverage and significant commercial sponsorships. More importantly, it is a proving ground for new technologies and a battlefield for the giants of the automotive industry. While race car performance depends on elements such as engine power, chassis design, tire adhesion and of course, the driver, aerodynamics probably plays the most vital role in determining the performance and efficiency of a race car. Front and/or rear wings are visible on many of them. During this seminar, you will learn about many other critical components of a race car including diffusers and add-ons such as vortex generators and spoilers. You will also discover that due to the competitive nature of this sport and its associated short design cycles, engineering decisions about a more »
Almost as soon as cars had been invented, races of various kinds were organized. In all its forms (open-wheel, touring car, sports car, production-car, one-make, stock car, etc.), car racing is today a very popular sport with a huge media coverage and significant commercial sponsorships. More importantly, it is a proving ground for new technologies and a battlefield for the giants of the automotive industry. While race car performance depends on elements such as engine power, chassis design, tire adhesion and of course, the driver, aerodynamics probably plays the most vital role in determining the performance and efficiency of a race car. Front and/or rear wings are visible on many of them. During this seminar, you will learn about many other critical components of a race car including diffusers and add-ons such as vortex generators and spoilers. You will also discover that due to the competitive nature of this sport and its associated short design cycles, engineering decisions about a race car must rely on combined information from track, wind tunnel, and numerical computations. It is clear that airplanes fly on wings. However, when you have completed this seminar, you will be able to understand that cars fly on their tires. You will also be able to appreciate that aerodynamics is important not only for drag reduction, but also for increasing cornering speeds and lateral stability. You will be able to correlate between a race car shape and the aerodynamics effects intended for influencing performance. And if you have been a fan of the Ferrari 458 Italia, you will be able to figure out what that black moustache in the front of the car was for.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: Farhat, C. (PI)

AA 115Q: The Global Positioning System: Where on Earth are We, and What Time is It?

Preference to freshmen. Why people want to know where they are: answers include cross-Pacific trips of Polynesians, missile guidance, and distraught callers. How people determine where they are: navigation technology from dead-reckoning, sextants, and satellite navigation (GPS). Hands-on experience. How GPS works; when it does not work; possibilities for improving performance.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Lo, S. (PI)

AA 116Q: Electric Automobiles and Aircraft

Transportation accounts for nearly one-third of American energy use and greenhouse gas emissions and three-quarters of American oil consumption. It has crucial impacts on climate change, air pollution, resource depletion, and national security. Students wishing to address these issues reconsider how we move, finding sustainable transportation solutions. An introduction to the issue, covering the past and present of transportation and its impacts; examining alternative fuel proposals; and digging deeper into the most promising option: battery electric vehicles. Energy requirements of air, ground, and maritime transportation; design of electric motors, power control systems, drive trains, and batteries; and technologies for generating renewable energy. Two opportunities for hands-on experiences with electric cars. Prerequisites: Introduction to calculus and Physics AP or elementary mechanics.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

AA 118N: How to Design a Space Mission: from Concept to Execution

Space exploration is truly fascinating. From the space race led by governments as an outgrowth of the Cold War to the new era of space commercialization led by private companies and startups, more than 50 years have passed, characterized by great leaps forward and discoveries. We will learn how space missions are designed, from concept to execution, based on the professional experience of the lecturer and numerous examples of spacecraft, including unique hardware demonstrations by startups of the Silicon Valley. We will study the essentials of systems engineering as applicable to a variety of mission types, for communication, navigation, science, commercial, and military applications. We will explore the various elements of a space mission, including the spacecraft, ground, and launch segments with their functionalities. Special emphasis will be given to the design cycle, to understand how spacecraft are born, from the stakeholders' needs, through analysis, synthesis, all the way to th more »
Space exploration is truly fascinating. From the space race led by governments as an outgrowth of the Cold War to the new era of space commercialization led by private companies and startups, more than 50 years have passed, characterized by great leaps forward and discoveries. We will learn how space missions are designed, from concept to execution, based on the professional experience of the lecturer and numerous examples of spacecraft, including unique hardware demonstrations by startups of the Silicon Valley. We will study the essentials of systems engineering as applicable to a variety of mission types, for communication, navigation, science, commercial, and military applications. We will explore the various elements of a space mission, including the spacecraft, ground, and launch segments with their functionalities. Special emphasis will be given to the design cycle, to understand how spacecraft are born, from the stakeholders' needs, through analysis, synthesis, all the way to their integration and validation. We will compare the current designs with those employed in the early days of the space age, and show the importance of economics in the development of spacecraft. Finally, we will brainstorm startup ideas and apply the concepts learned to a notional space mission design as a team.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: D'Amico, S. (PI)
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