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1 - 3 of 3 results for: "GSBGEN 381"

EDUC 377C: Strategic Philanthropy

(Also GSBGEN 381). Appropriate for any student driven to effect positive social change from either the for-profit or nonprofit sector, Strategic Philanthropy ( GSBGEN 381/ EDUC 377C) will challenge students to expand their own strategic thinking about philanthropic aspiration and action. In recent decades, philanthropy has become an industry in itself - amounting to over $300 billion in the year 2012. Additionally, the last decade has seen unprecedented innovation in both philanthropy and social change. This course explores the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations, and corporate foundations; and innovative models, including funding intermediaries, open-source platforms, technology-driven philanthropies, and venture philanthropy partnerships. Course work will include readings and case discussions that encourage students to analyze both domestic and global philanthropic strategies as they relate to foundation mission, grant making, evaluation, financial management, infrastructure, knowledge management, policy change, and board governance. Guest speakers will consist of high profile philanthropists, foundation presidents, social entrepreneurs and Silicon Valley business leaders creating new philanthropic models. The course will also provide students with real-world grantmaking experience in completing nonprofit organizational assessments and making grants to organizations totaling $20,000. The course will culminate in an individual project in which students will complete a business plan for a $10 million private foundation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GSBGEN 319: Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Investing

The course will be structured around the perspective of a high net worth individual who has decided to devote substantial resources to philanthropy and wishes to decide which philanthropic goals to pursue and how best to achieve them. Although there are no formal prerequisites for the course, we will assume that students have experience working at a foundation, nonprofit organization, impact investing fund, or similar organization, or have taken an introductory course in strategic philanthropy such as GSBGEN 381. (There is sufficient overlap with Paul Brest's Autumn course, Measuring and Improving the Impact of Social Enterprises ( GSBGEN 322), that students taking that course should not enroll in this one.) nnWe will explore selected topics including:n- the roles of the philanthropic and nonprofit sectors in society;n- choosing philanthropic goals, and whether giving to the poor is morally obligatory ;n- the justifications for tax-subsidized philanthropy;n- alternative legal and organizational structures to carry out philanthropic programs, including donor-advised funds, direct giving, foundations;n- whether foundations should exist in perpetuity or spend down over a finite number of years;n- fundamentals of nonprofit strategy;n- designing performance metrics (KPIs) and measuring philanthropic impact;n- barriers to the practice of strategic philanthropy;n- fundamentals of investment management for pools of philanthropic capital;n- socially motivated criteria for investing, including PRIs, MRIs, SRIs, and negative screens;n- impact investing and investor-funded pay for success programs.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 381: Strategic Philanthropy

Appropriate for any student driven to effect positive social change from either the for-profit or nonprofit sector, Strategic Philanthropy will challenge students to expand their own strategic thinking about philanthropic aspiration and action. In recent decades, philanthropy has become an industry in itself - amounting to over $300 billion in the year 2012. Additionally, the last decade has seen unprecedented innovation in both philanthropy and social change. This course explores the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations, and corporate foundations; and innovative models, including funding intermediaries, open-source platforms, technology-driven philanthropies, and venture philanthropy partnerships. Course work will include readings and case discussions that encourage students to analyze both domestic and global philanthropic strategies as they relate to foundation mission, grant making, evaluation, financial management, infrastructure, knowledge management, policy change, and board governance. Guest speakers will consist of high profile philanthropists, foundation presidents, social entrepreneurs and Silicon Valley business leaders creating new philanthropic models. The course will also provide students with real-world grantmaking experience in completing nonprofit organizational assessments and making grants to organizations totaling $20,000. The course will culminate in an individual project in which students will complete a business plan for a $10 million private foundation.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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