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1 - 10 of 206 results for: AAAS::ida

AFRICAAM 3E: Michelle Obama in American Culture (AMSTUD 3E, CSRE 3E, FEMGEN 3E, HISTORY 3E)

Never before has the United States had a First Lady like Michelle Obama. During her eight years in the White House, Michelle Obama transformed traditional meanings of womanhood, marriage, motherhood, and style and created new possibilities for what it means to be strong and what it means to be beautiful. No First Lady has ever been so scrutinized but also so beloved: from her J. Crew dresses to her Let's Move campaign, from her vegetable gardens to her chiseled arms, and from her powerful speeches to her casual and always authentic personality. This class examines the impact on American culture of the most popular First Lady in American history.
Last offered: Spring 2017

AFRICAAM 5I: Hamilton: An American Musical (AMSTUD 5I, CSRE 5I, HISTORY 3G)

"Hamilton" is one the most popular and most celebrated musicals in American history. It has received 11 Tony Awards, including best musical, and 16 Tony nominations, the most nominations in Broadway history. It won the Pulitzer Prize and a Grammy Award. The musical draws on the language and rhythms of hip-hop and R & B, genres that are underrepresented in the musical theater tradition. "Hamilton" has redefined the American musical, particularly in terms of sound, casting, and storytelling. What explains the deep cultural impact and acclaim for this play?n nThis interdisciplinary course examines Alexander Hamilton and his world as well as Hamilton: An American Musical through a series of lectures from faculty in History, Theater and Performance Studies, English, Music, and Writing and Rhetoric.
Last offered: Spring 2018

AFRICAAM 10A: Introduction to Identity, Diversity, and Aesthetics: Arts, Culture, and Pedagogy (CSRE 10A)

This weekly lecture series introduces students to the study of identity, diversity, and aesthetics through the work of leading artists and scholars affiliated with the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA). This year's course highlights the educational impact of arts and culture. How can arts and culture help to advance pedagogies of liberation? Among other things, we will examine hip-hop education and how it illuminates ideas around culturally relevant and culturally sustaining pedagogies, indigenous knowledges, embodied knowledges, hip-hop feminisms, and community engaged research. We will look at case studies from East Palo Alto, CA and Cape Town, South Africa.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

AFRICAAM 19: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: The Soul Tradition in African American Music (AMSTUD 147J, CSRE 147J, MUSIC 147J, MUSIC 247J)

The African American tradition of soul music from its origins in blues, gospel, and jazz to its influence on today's r&b, hip hop, and dance music. Style such as rhythm and blues, Motown, Southern soul, funk, Philadelphia soul, disco, Chicago house, Detroit techno, trip hop, and neo-soul. Soul's cultural influence and global reach; its interaction with politics, gender, place, technology, and the economy. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 21: African American Vernacular English (CSRE 21, LINGUIST 65, LINGUIST 265)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 32: The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice (AMSTUD 32, CSRE 32A, EDUC 32, EDUC 432, TAPS 32)

This course-series brings together leading scholars with critically-acclaimed artists, local teachers, youth, and community organizations to consider the complex relationships between culture, knowledge, pedagogy and social justice. Participants will examine the cultural meaning of knowledge as "the 5th element" of Hip Hop Culture (in addition to MCing, DJing, graffiti, and dance) and how educators and cultural workers have leveraged this knowledge for social justice. Overall, participants will gain a strong theoretical knowledge of culturally relevant and culturally sustaining pedagogies and learn to apply this knowledge by engaging with guest artists, teachers, youth, and community youth arts organizations.
Last offered: Spring 2014

AFRICAAM 36: REPRESENT! Covering Race, Culture, and Identity In The Arts through Writing, Media, and Transmedia. (CSRE 36)

Probably since the first audience formed for the first chalk scrawls in a cave, there have been storytellers to narrate that caveperson's art and life, and critics to troll that caveperson's choice and usage of color. And so it goes. This course is an exploration into how to cover race, culture, and identity in the arts in journalism, such as print, web, video, radio, and podcasting. It is also an arts journalism practicum. During the quarter, we will be working toward creating work that is publishable in various venues and outlets. In this course, we will be discussing exemplary arts writers and their works and interrogating critical questions around race, identity, representation, and ethics. Experienced journalists, editors, and experts from different platforms and backgrounds will also be imparting important skills and training that will help you to navigate today's working media and transmedia environments. Those who enroll in the class will be expected to produce quality content more »
Probably since the first audience formed for the first chalk scrawls in a cave, there have been storytellers to narrate that caveperson's art and life, and critics to troll that caveperson's choice and usage of color. And so it goes. This course is an exploration into how to cover race, culture, and identity in the arts in journalism, such as print, web, video, radio, and podcasting. It is also an arts journalism practicum. During the quarter, we will be working toward creating work that is publishable in various venues and outlets. In this course, we will be discussing exemplary arts writers and their works and interrogating critical questions around race, identity, representation, and ethics. Experienced journalists, editors, and experts from different platforms and backgrounds will also be imparting important skills and training that will help you to navigate today's working media and transmedia environments. Those who enroll in the class will be expected to produce quality content (e.g. articles, blog posts, video reports, podcasts) for media outlets. Some travel outside of class may be required for additional reporting and training. This seminar class will be By Instructor Approval Only. Please submit an application by February 22 at 11:59pm. Starred items are required. The app is available at: http://bit.ly/RepresentClass36 Those selected for this class will be informed by March 2nd so that they may enroll in the course. Please do not apply for the course if you are unsure about completing it. If you have any questions, you may email the instructor at: jeffc410@stanford.edu.
Last offered: Spring 2015

AFRICAAM 37: Contemporary Choreography: Chocolate Heads Performance Project (DANCE 30)

Students from diverse dance styles (ballet to hip-hop to contemporary) participate in the dance-making/remix process and collaborate with musicians, visual artists, designers and spoken word artists, to co-create a multidisciplinary finished production and installation. Students of all dance or athletic backgrounds are welcome to audition on Wednesday (9/26) and Monday (10/1) during class time. Visual artists, musicians and dancers may also contact the instructor for further information at ahayes1@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 43: Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (AMSTUD 12A, ENGLISH 12A)

(Formerly English 43/143). In his bold study, What Was African American Literature?, Kenneth Warren defines African American literature as a late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century response to the nation's Jim Crow segregated order. But in the aftermath of the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement, can critics still speak, coherently, of "African American literature"? And how does this political conception of African American literary production compare with accounts grounded in black language and culture? Taking up Warren's intervention, this course will explore African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals and slave narratives to texts composed at the height of desegregation and decolonization struggles at mid-century and beyond.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 45: Contemporary Choreography: Freestyle Improvisation StratLab (DANCE 45)

This class is an arena for physical and artistic exploration to fire the imagination of dance improvisers, cultivate sensation and perception within and without studio practice and to promote interactive intelligence.nStudents will learn to harness and transform habitual movement patterns and dance trainings as resources for new ways of moving: expand their awareness of being a part of a bigger picture, while being attentive to everything all at once: and to use visual, aural and kinesthetic responses to convert those impulses into artistic material. Class will be accompanied by live and recorded music and include weekly jam sessions. Open to students from all dance, movement, athletic backgrounds and skill levels. Beginners welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)
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