2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 86 results for: AAAS::ss

AFRICAAM 19: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: The Soul Tradition in African American Music (AMSTUD 147J, CSRE 147J, MUSIC 147J, MUSIC 247J)

The African American tradition of soul music from its origins in blues, gospel, and jazz to its influence on today's r&b, hip hop, and dance music. Style such as rhythm and blues, Motown, Southern soul, funk, Philadelphia soul, disco, Chicago house, Detroit techno, trip hop, and neo-soul. Soul's cultural influence and global reach; its interaction with politics, gender, place, technology, and the economy. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 21: African American Vernacular English (CSRE 21, LINGUIST 65, LINGUIST 265)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 31: RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora

Students to engage in an intellectual discussion about the African Diaspora with leading faculty at Stanford across departments including Education, Linguistics, Sociology, History, Political Science, English, and Theater & Performance Studies. Several lunches with guest speakers. This course will meet in the Program for African & African American Studies Office in Building 360 Room 362B (Main Quad). This course is limited to Freshman and Sophomore enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1

AFRICAAM 32: The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice (AMSTUD 32, CSRE 32A, EDUC 32, EDUC 432, TAPS 32)

This course-series brings together leading scholars with critically-acclaimed artists, local teachers, youth, and community organizations to consider the complex relationships between culture, knowledge, pedagogy and social justice. Participants will examine the cultural meaning of knowledge as "the 5th element" of Hip Hop Culture (in addition to MCing, DJing, graffiti, and dance) and how educators and cultural workers have leveraged this knowledge for social justice. Overall, participants will gain a strong theoretical knowledge of culturally relevant and culturally sustaining pedagogies and learn to apply this knowledge by engaging with guest artists, teachers, youth, and community youth arts organizations.
Last offered: Spring 2014

AFRICAAM 36: REPRESENT! Covering Race, Culture, and Identity In The Arts through Writing, Media, and Transmedia. (CSRE 36)

Probably since the first audience formed for the first chalk scrawls in a cave, there have been storytellers to narrate that caveperson's art and life, and critics to troll that caveperson's choice and usage of color. And so it goes. This course is an exploration into how to cover race, culture, and identity in the arts in journalism, such as print, web, video, radio, and podcasting. It is also an arts journalism practicum. During the quarter, we will be working toward creating work that is publishable in various venues and outlets. In this course, we will be discussing exemplary arts writers and their works and interrogating critical questions around race, identity, representation, and ethics. Experienced journalists, editors, and experts from different platforms and backgrounds will also be imparting important skills and training that will help you to navigate today's working media and transmedia environments. Those who enroll in the class will be expected to produce quality content more »
Probably since the first audience formed for the first chalk scrawls in a cave, there have been storytellers to narrate that caveperson's art and life, and critics to troll that caveperson's choice and usage of color. And so it goes. This course is an exploration into how to cover race, culture, and identity in the arts in journalism, such as print, web, video, radio, and podcasting. It is also an arts journalism practicum. During the quarter, we will be working toward creating work that is publishable in various venues and outlets. In this course, we will be discussing exemplary arts writers and their works and interrogating critical questions around race, identity, representation, and ethics. Experienced journalists, editors, and experts from different platforms and backgrounds will also be imparting important skills and training that will help you to navigate today's working media and transmedia environments. Those who enroll in the class will be expected to produce quality content (e.g. articles, blog posts, video reports, podcasts) for media outlets. Some travel outside of class may be required for additional reporting and training. This seminar class will be By Instructor Approval Only. Please submit an application by February 22 at 11:59pm. Starred items are required. The app is available at: http://bit.ly/RepresentClass36 Those selected for this class will be informed by March 2nd so that they may enroll in the course. Please do not apply for the course if you are unsure about completing it. If you have any questions, you may email the instructor at: jeffc410@stanford.edu.
Last offered: Spring 2015

AFRICAAM 41: Genes and Identity (ANTHRO 41, CSRE 41A)

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and anthropological works (ethnographies). We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (as proof of heritage, disease risk, or legal standing) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. Throughout we will look at how new social movements are organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, health, and legal truth. Several examples include political analyses of citizenship and belonging. On this count we will discuss issues of African ancestry testing as evidence in slavery reparations more »
In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and anthropological works (ethnographies). We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (as proof of heritage, disease risk, or legal standing) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. Throughout we will look at how new social movements are organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, health, and legal truth. Several examples include political analyses of citizenship and belonging. On this count we will discuss issues of African ancestry testing as evidence in slavery reparations cases, revisit debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, and hear arguments on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel. We will also examine the ways genetic knowledge may shape different health politics at the individual and societal level. On this count we will do close readings of how personal genomics testing companies operate, we will investigate how health disparities funding as well as orphan disease research take on new valences when re-framed in genetic terms, and we will see how new articulations of global health priorities are emerging through genetic research in places like Africa. Finally we will explore social implications of forensic uses of DNA. Here we will examine civil liberties concerns about genetic familial searching in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects, and inquire into the use of DNA to generate digital mugshots of suspects that re-introduce genetic concepts of race.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 48Q: South Africa: Contested Transitions (HISTORY 48Q)

Preference to sophomores. The inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president in May 1994 marked the end of an era and a way of life for South Africa. The changes have been dramatic, yet the legacies of racism and inequality persist. Focus: overlapping and sharply contested transitions. Who advocates and opposes change? Why? What are their historical and social roots and strategies? How do people reconstruct their society? Historical and current sources, including films, novels, and the Internet.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2
Instructors: Samoff, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 75E: Black Cinema

How filmmakers represent historical and cultural issues in Black cinema.
Last offered: Autumn 2011 | Repeatable for credit

AFRICAAM 101F: Race & Technology (AFRICAAM 201F)

The program in African & African American Studies will be offering a weekly lecture series to expose and introduce underrepresented groups to the world of technology by creating a space where the idea of starting can lead to a "Start Up". The AAAS "Race & Technology" course endeavors to de-code the language of technology creation, how to build a team, problem solving, pitching an idea, leveraging the work of all disciplines in creating an entrepreneurship mindset. nnnScholars and industry people will cover topics such as the digital divide, women in technology, and social media.
Last offered: Spring 2013

AFRICAAM 106: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints