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1 - 10 of 68 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HISTORY 152: History of American Law (HISTORY 352B)

(Formerly Law 318. Now Law 3504.) This course examines the growth and development of American legal institutions with particular attention to crime and punishment, slavery and race relations, the role of law in developing the economy, and the place of lawyers in American society, from colonial times to the present. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Final exam or paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Cross-listed with History ( HISTORY 152 Consent of instructor required) & ( HISTORY 352B).
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Friedman, L. (PI)

HISTORY 200A: Doing Legal History

What is law, and how do we write its history? Drawing on case studies from a broad range of periods and places, this course will explore how law is made, interpreted, enforced, experienced, and resisted. It will also explore how historians use both legal and non-legal sources to study the ways in which law and society have shaped each other. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

HISTORY 200B: Doing Environmental History: Climate Change... the podcast

This will be a hands-on course that will emphasize how to do environmental history. Students will reflect on what it means to think historically about a pressing contemporary problem--climate change. We will ask historical questions, produce historical knowledge, and as a critical part of the course, present that knowledge to a general audience in the form of a podcast. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI

HISTORY 200C: Doing the History of Race and Ethnicity

How does ethnicity and race operate in different time periods, and across different historical, national, and cultural contexts? This course guides students through an historical and cross-cultural exploration of ethnoracial identity formation, racism, ethnopolitics, migration, belonging, and exclusion, using primary and secondary sources to examine how the lived experience of race and ethnicity shapes and is shaped by local, regional, and global dimensions. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

HISTORY 200D: Doing the History of Science and Technology

The history of science has often been at the crux of key debates in the larger field of history, including debates over objectivity and bias, relativism and the problem of "present-ism." This course explores key questions, methods and debates in the history of science and examines how historians of science have addressed these organizing problems of the historical discipline. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 200E: Doing Economic History

The course introduces major approaches to economic history such as the classical school, Malthusianism, Marxism and Dependency theories, moral economic critique, institutionalism, technological determinism, environmentalism, and the Anthropocene thesis. Using these approaches, students will explore themes including pre-modern agrarian orders; the emergence of fiscal-military state; financial and commercial expansion; diverse property regimes; the industrial revolution; growth and poverty; markets and networks; labor and capital; the rise of capitalism and imperialisms; immigration; formal and informal economies; development and underdevelopment; globalization and environmental crisis. Special emphasis will be given to the theories of the Great Divergence, namely why the West became the dominant economic power over the rest of the world and how different economic cultures responded to that. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

HISTORY 200F: Doing Microhistory

Explores the emergence of microhistory as a genre in the 1960s and the controversies it stimulated. We will read examples of microhistory from various times and places; if possible, students will conduct their own microhistory in the course of the quarter. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 200G: Doing Intellectual History

A consideration of the claims made by twentieth century historians regarding the nature and methods of intellectual history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Baker, K. (PI)

HISTORY 202G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 302G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 203: Premodern Economic Cultures (HISTORY 303)

Modern economists have made a science of studying the aggregate effects of individual choices. This science is based on the realities of personal freedom and individual choice. Prior to the modern era, however, different realities comprised very different economic cultures: moral economies in which greed was evil and generosity benefitted the patron¿s soul; familial collectives operating within historical conditioned diasporas; economies of obligation that threatened to collapse under their own weight as economic structures shifted. In this course we will be reading cross-culturally to develop an understanding of the shared and distinct elements of premodern economic cultures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)
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