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1 - 10 of 66 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HISTORY 152: History of American Law (HISTORY 352B)

(Formerly Law 318. Now Law 3504.) This course examines the growth and development of American legal institutions with particular attention to crime and punishment, slavery and race relations, the role of law in developing the economy, and the place of lawyers in American society, from colonial times to the present. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Final exam or paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Cross-listed with History ( HISTORY 152 Consent of instructor required) & ( HISTORY 352B).
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Friedman, L. (PI)

HISTORY 201: From Confederate Monuments to Wikipedia: The Politics of Remembering the Past (AFRICAAM 102, CSRE 201)

Gateway course for Public History/Public Service track. Examines various ways history is used outside of the classroom, and its role in political/cultural debates in the U.S. and abroad. Showcases issues and careers in public history with guest speakers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 201K: A History of the Global Left: Revolutionary Movements against Empire (HISTORY 301K)

This class will trace the formation of trans-regional movements against imperialism in the modern period that helped create a "global Left." We will read contemporary works by thinkers such as Lord Byron, Karl Marx, Mohandas K. Gandhi, Annie Besant, and Faiz Ahmad Faiz, as well as historical studies of these figures and the movements in which they figured. Key topics include the American Revolution, the Indian "Mutiny" of 1857, the Ghadar movement, Pan-Islamism, Irish nationalism, and global communism.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 202D: The History of Genocide (HISTORY 302D)

This course will explore the history, politics, and character of genocide from the beginning of world history to the present. It will also consider the ways that the international system has developed to prevent and punish genocide.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 202G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 302G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 203C: History of Ignorance

Scholars pay a lot of attention to knowledge--how it arises and impacts society--but much less attention has been given to ignorance, even though its impacts are equally profound. Here we explore the political history of ignorance, through case studies including: corporate denials of harms from particular products (tobacco, asbestos), climate change denialism, and creationist rejections of Darwinian evolution. Students will be expected to produce a research paper tracing the origins and impact of a particular form of ignorance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 203K: Trauma and History (CSRE 203H)

This course will examine trauma as a historical process, following the intergenerational impacts of history's darker dramas, analyzing collective strategies for coping and healing after trauma, and asking whether we can speak of "traumatized societies." Short readings and weekly discussions.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 204: What is History?

An introduction to the discipline of history, designed for current or prospective History majors. Focusing on methods and theories of historical inquiry, students will learn how historians frame problems, collect and analyze evidence, and contribute to on-going debates. Through a series of case studies or exemplary works of historical study, the course will also explore different genres of historical writing (such as narrative, biography, social history) and different methodological approaches to history (such as Annales school, microhistory, and cultural history).
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 204A: Reimagining History: New Approaches to the Past (HISTORY 304A)

This class explores, through analysis and practice, the ways in which history can be told and experienced through means other than traditional scholarly narratives. Approaches include literary fiction and non-fiction, digital media, graphic arts, maps, exhibitions, and film. A final project will require students to produce their own innovative work of history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 204D: Advanced Topics in Agnotology (HISTORY 304D)

Advanced research into the history of ignorance. Our goal will be to explore how ignorance is created, maintained and destroyed, using case studies from topics such as tobacco denialism, global climate denialism, and other forms of resistance to knowledge making. Course culminates in a research paper on the theory and practice of agnotology, the science of ignorance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)
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