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1 - 10 of 63 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HISTORY 152: History of American Law (HISTORY 352B)

(Formerly Law 318. Now Law 3504.) This course examines the growth and development of American legal institutions with particular attention to crime and punishment, slavery and race relations, the role of law in developing the economy, and the place of lawyers in American society, from colonial times to the present. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Final exam or paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Cross-listed with History ( HISTORY 152 Consent of instructor required) & ( HISTORY 352B).
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Friedman, L. (PI)

HISTORY 201: Introduction to Public History and Public Service (AFRICAAM 102, CSRE 201)

Gateway course for Public History/Public Service track. Examines various ways history is used outside of the classroom, and its role in political/cultural debates in the U.S. and abroad. Showcases careers in public history with guest speakers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 201E: Life Under Nazism (HISTORY 301E)

This course explores everyday life in the Third Reich. Moving inside political events, students will examine daily experiences in the Nazi state-- from Hitler's tumultuous rise to power through the end of World War Two. We will see how people navigated new ideologies, practices, anti-Semitism, war, and mass murder. Through analysis of memoirs, diaries, essays, novels, propaganda, scholarship, and film, students will investigate how social and political developments can reveal the very boundaries between self and society.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

HISTORY 201K: A History of the Global Left: Revolutionary Movements against Empire (HISTORY 301K)

This class will trace the formation of trans-regional movements against imperialism in the modern period that helped create a "global Left." We will read contemporary works by thinkers such as Lord Byron, Karl Marx, Mohandas K. Gandhi, Annie Besant, and Faiz Ahmad Faiz, as well as historical studies of these figures and the movements in which they figured. Key topics include the American Revolution, the Indian "Mutiny" of 1857, the Ghadar movement, Pan-Islamism, Irish nationalism, and global communism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 202K: The Holocaust and Its Aftermath (HISTORY 302K, JEWISHST 282K, JEWISHST 382K)

This seminar gives an overview over different aspects of the history of the Holocaust and its aftermath and will examine key issues in recent Holocaust historiography and questions of memory and representation. Special emphasis is put on the nature of the historian's task, as viewed through the lens of historians of the Holocaust, as well as to the significance of the Holocaust in history and how it has changed over time. The course will confront students with historiographical texts and historical documents, with photography and film, works of scholarship and art.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

HISTORY 203J: Water in World History (HISTORY 303J)

Examines the human relationship to water in various geographical, ecological, technological, cultural and sociopolitical settings, primarily during, but not limited to, the 19th and 20th centuries. Develops a broad historical understanding of the dwindling supply, deteriorating quality and inequitable distribution of freshwater today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 204: What is History?

An introduction to the discipline of history, designed for current or prospective History majors. Focusing on methods and theories of historical inquiry, students will learn how historians frame problems, collect and analyze evidence, and contribute to on-going debates. Through a series of case studies or exemplary works of historical study, the course will also explore different genres of historical writing (such as narrative, biography, social history) and different methodological approaches to history (such as Annales school, microhistory, and cultural history).
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 204E: Totalitarianism (HISTORY 307E)

Modern revolutionary and totalitarian politics. Sources include monographs on the medieval, Reformation, French Revolutionary, and Great War eras. Topics: the essence of modern ideology, the concept of the body national, state terror, charismatic leadership, gender assignments, private and public spheres, and identities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 204G: War and Society (HISTORY 304G, REES 304G)

How Western societies and cultures have responded to modern warfare. The relationship between its destructive capacity and effects on those who produce, are subject to, and must come to terms with its aftermath. Literary representations of WW I; destructive psychological effects of modern warfare including those who take pleasure in killing; changes in relations between the genders; consequences of genocidal ideology and racial prejudice; the theory of just war and its practical implementation; and how wars are commemorated.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 204K: Photographing the Past: Every Photograph is a History

The premise of this course is that all photographs¿including contemporary photographs -- are historical photographs, and that history in often unrecognized ways is visual. Photographs always and inevitably capture a past that can only be told by combining them with other photographs and documents. The seminar will look at how photographers, historians, and cultural critics treat the visualization of the past and how this opens up new ways of approaching history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: White, R. (PI)
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