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1 - 10 of 65 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HISTORY 152: History of American Law (HISTORY 352B)

(Same as LAW 318.) Modern history of American law, legal thought, legal institutions and the legal profession. Topics include law and regulation of corporate organizations and labor relations in the age of enterprise, law of race relations in the South and North, development of classical legalism, critiques of classical legalism, modern administrative state, organized legal profession, New Deal legal thought and legislation, legal order of the 50s, expansion of enterprise liability, civil rights movements from 1940, rights revolution of the Warren Court and Great Society.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Friedman, L. (PI)

HISTORY 201A: The Global Drug Wars (HISTORY 301A)

Explores the global story of the struggle over drugs from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include the history of the opium wars in China, controversies over wine and tobacco in Iran, narco-trafficking and civil war in Lebanon, the Afghan 'narco-state,' Andean cocaine as a global commodity, the politics of U.S.- Mexico drug trafficking, incarceration, drugs, and race in the U.S., and the globalization of the American 'war on drugs.'
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 201E: Life under Nazism (HISTORY 301E)

This course explores everyday life in the Third Reich. Moving inside political events, students will examine daily experiences in the Nazi state-- from Hitler's tumultuous rise to power through the end of World War Two. We will see how people navigated new ideologies, practices, anti-Semitism, war, and mass murder. Through analysis of memoirs, diaries, essays, novels, propaganda, scholarship, and film, students will investigate how social and political developments can reveal the very boundaries between self and society.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

HISTORY 201J: Objects of History: From "Material Culture" to "Making" (HISTORY 301J)

This class considers objects as historical sources. It surveys diverse approaches to the study and display of physical evidence, from "material culture" to "making." These explorations of object-oriented research will inform the course's hands-on components, working with objects and replicating historical experiences. With its focus on the question of what historical knowledge can be gained through interactivity, the course is suited to students whose interests include museums and public history, reenactment and performance, the maker movement, or interdisciplinary methodology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Haring, K. (PI)

HISTORY 202: International History and International Relations Theory (HISTORY 306E, POLISCI 216E, POLISCI 316)

The aims of the course are: to gain some understanding of the history and development of the international states system; to explore the different ways in which historians and theorists have studied the system; to analyze aspects of the system that may now be changing; to identify the ways in which international history and international relations theory can learn from each other. The course will focus on major wars and the efforts to rebuild order after such wars.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Holloway, D. (PI)

HISTORY 202B: Coffee, Sugar, and Chocolate: Commodities and Consumption in World History, 1200-1800 (HISTORY 302B)

Many of the basic commodities that we consider staples of everyday life became part of an increasingly interconnected world of trade, goods, and consumption between 1200 and 1800. This seminar offers an introduction to the material culture of the late medieval and early modern world, with an emphasis on the role of European trade and empires in these developments. We will examine recent work on the circulation, use, and consumption of things, starting with the age of the medieval merchant, and followed by the era of the Columbian exchange in the Americas that was also the world of the Renaissance collector, the Ottoman patron, and the Ming connoisseur. This seminar will explore the material horizons of an increasingly interconnected world, with the rise of the Dutch East India Company and other trading societies, and the emergence of the Atlantic economy. It concludes by exploring classic debates about the "birth" of consumer society in the eighteenth century. How did the meaning of things and people's relationships to them change over these centuries? What can we learn about the past by studying things?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 202G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 302G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 203C: History of Ignorance

Scholars pay a lot of attention to knowledge--how it arises and impacts society--but much less attention has been given to ignorance, even though its impacts are equally profound. Here we explore the political history of ignorance, through case studies including: corporate denials of harms from particular products (tobacco, asbestos), climate change denialism, and creationist rejections of Darwinian evolution. Students will be expected to produce a research paper tracing the origins and impact of a particular form of ignorance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 203E: Global Catholicism (INTNLREL 103E)

The rise of Catholicism as a global phenomenon, and its multiple transformations as it spread to the Americas, Asia, and Africa. Topics include the Reformation, Tridentine reform and the Jesuits, the underground churches in England and the Dutch Republic, the missions to Asia, the Spanish conquest of Latin America, conversion and indigenous religions, missionary imperialism and new religious movements in the non-European world.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 203G: Mobile Food: A Global Food History (HISTORY 303G)

The scope of global food history comprises all historical periods. Although, many different fields of history and related areas of expertise join in multi- and cross-disciplinary researches, global food history remains to be above all economic and social history. As this course concentrates on the global distribution of food and eating habits, the central attention lies on the interdependence of regions: starting from their sporadic interrelations, followed by evolving entanglements, and the sometimes subsequent building of, such as trading, institutions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Kaller, M. (PI)
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