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61 - 70 of 70 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HISTORY 235: The Renaissance of War: Politics, Technology, and War in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy

The dynamic societies of the Italian Peninsula of the 14th to 16th centuries "prosperous, astonishingly creative, politically fractious, and endemically violent" produced sweeping, deeply consequential changes. Among these were new developments in the theory and practice of war, politics, and diplomacy that laid the foundations for the modern state system and European military power. The class covers: new diplomatic practice; the Military Revolution; state-building; war finance; court culture; and the intersection of these with the shimmering brilliance of Renaissance culture.
Instructors: Brege, B. (PI)

HISTORY 235C: Readings in the Supernatural (HISTORY 335C)

Class will read and discuss a selection of monographs, scholarly essays, and primary sources on the rich supernatural world of early modern Europe. We will discuss how fairies, werewolves, nightmares, and trolls all became witches, how the binary of angels and demons figured in European thought, and how the marginalized imaginary was reconstituted in theatre and fiction.
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 236F: The End of the World As They Knew It: Culture, Caf├ęs, and Crisis in Europe, 1880-1918 (HISTORY 336F)

The years stretching from roughly 1880 to end of the First World War were marked by profound social upheaval and an intense burst of creativity. This seminar will focus on the major cultural movements and big ideas of the period. Topics covered include the rise of mass culture and cinema, the origins of psychoanalysis, anti-Semitism and Zionism, new anxieties about sexuality and the ¿New Woman,¿ anarchism, decadence, degeneration, and Dada ¿ with cameos from Bernhardt, Freud, Klimt, Nietzsche, Toulouse-Lautrec, Wilde, Zola, and other luminaries of the age.
Instructors: Braude, M. (PI)

HISTORY 238G: Ethnography of the Late Middle Ages: Social history and popular culture in the age of the plague (HISTORY 338G)

During the late Middle Ages, as Europe was recovering from the devastation of the Black Death, political reorganization contributed to a burst of archival documentation that allows historians richly detailed glimpses of societies in transition. We will be reading selected scholarly articles and monographs covering such topics as persecution, prechristian cultural remnants, folk theologies, festival cultures, peasant revolts, heresy, and the advent of the diabolic witch.
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 254D: Law, Slavery, and Race (AFRICAAM 254D, CSRE 154D, HISTORY 354)

(Same as LAW 747.) This course will explore the interaction of law, slavery and race in the United States, as well as from a comparative perspective. We will read original documents, including excerpts of trial transcripts, appellate opinions, treatises, codes, and first-person narratives. We will study the way law, politics and culture interacted to shape the institution of slavery and the development of modern conceptions of race. Course lectures and discussions will focus on questions such as: Did different legal regimes (Spanish, French, British) foster different systems of race and slavery in the Americas? How did/does law work "on the ground" to shape the production of racial hierarchy and creation of racial identities? In what ways did slavery influence the U.S. Constitution? How has race shaped citizenship in the U.S., and how can we compare it to other constitutional regimes? The course will begin with the origins of New World slavery, race and racism, and move chronologically to the present day.
Instructors: Gross, A. (PI)

HISTORY 267E: Martin Luther King, Jr. - His Life, Ideas, and Legacy (AFRICAAM 267E, AMSTUD 267E)

Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's King Research and Education Institute, this course will provide a general introduction to King's life, visionary ideas, and historical significance. In addition to lectures and discussions, the course will include presentations of documentaries such as Eyes on the Prize. Students will be expected to read the required texts, participate in class discussions, and submit a research paper or an audio-visual project developed in consultation with the professor.
Instructors: Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 271: Mexicans in the United States (AMSTUD 271, CHILATST 171, CSRE 171H)

This course explores the lives and experiences of Mexicans living in the United States, from 1848 to the present. Themes and topics include: the legacies of colonialism, the Mexican-American War, transnational migration, the effects of economic stratification, race and racialization, and the impact of sexual and gender ideologies on the lives of Mexicans residing north of the border.

HISTORY 279: Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-2014 (HISTORY 379)

The newly independent nations of Latin America began the 19th century with economies roughly equal to the U.S. and Canada. What explains the economic gap that developed since 1800? Why are some Latin American nations rich and others poor and how have societies changed over time? Marxist, dependency, neoclassical, and institutionalist interpretive frameworks are explored. The effects of globalization on Latin American economic growth, autonomy, and potential for social justice are examined and debated.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom
Instructors: Frank, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 294D: Manchuria: Cradle of Conflict, Cockpit of Asia (HISTORY 394D)

How did Manchuria become Chinese? This course utilizes the dual waves of early twentieth-century writings and a wide array of recent scholarship dealing with Manchuria to explore the formation of nation-states out of the Qing and Japanese empires in Northeast Asia through the lenses of opium, migration, cities, warlords, and memoir. This course will be of interest to students concerned with developing transcultural understandings of Northeast Asian history.
Instructors: Chen, C. (PI)

HISTORY 299H: Junior Honors Colloquium

Required of junior History majors planning to write a History honors thesis during senior year. Meets four times during the quarter.
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)
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