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51 - 60 of 70 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HISTORY 293D: Global Intellectual History (HISTORY 393D)

Ideas have circulated globally for millennia but relatively recently have thinkers begun to conceptualize the global. Like "humanity" and "universalism," or what Marx called "international," the "global" too has complex genealogies. It is associated, often simultaneously, with empire and freedom, war and equality, commitment and treason, piracy and justice, homelessness and cosmopolitanism. Working with key 20th century texts from Italy, Britain, India, Israel, Palestine, Germany, France, and Algeria, course explores how thinking "globally" impacts the very foundations of modern political thought.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kumar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 293E: Female Divinities in China (HISTORY 393E, RELIGST 257X, RELIGST 357X)

This course examines the fundamental role of powerful goddesses in Chinese religion. It covers the entire range of imperial history and down to the present. It will look at, among other questions, what roles goddesses played in the spirit world, how this is related to the roles of human women, and why a civilization that excluded women from the public sphere granted them a dominant place, in the religious sphere. It is based entirely on readings in English.
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 295F: Race and Ethnicity in East Asia (ASNAMST 295F, HISTORY 395F)

Intensive exploration of major issues in the history of race and ethnicity in China, Japan, and Korea from the early modern period to the present day.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 299X: Preparing for International Field Work: Public Service or Research (HISTORY 399A)

Open to students in all classes, those planning internships abroad and those planning research, from juniors with honors theses and sophomores with Chappell Lougee grants to freshmen thinking ahead. Introduces resources on campus for planning international research and service. Raises issues that need to be considered in advance of going abroad: ethical concerns, Human Subjects Protocol, networking, personal safety and gender issues, confronting cultural differences. Exposes students to research methods: case studies, interviewing, working in foreign libraries and archives.

HISTORY 346: The Dynamics of Change in Africa (AFRICAST 301A, POLISCI 246P, POLISCI 346P)

Crossdisciplinary colloquium; required for the M.A. degree in African Studies. Open to advanced undergraduates and PhD students. Addresses critical issues including patterns of economic collapse and recovery; political change and democratization; and political violence, civil war, and genocide. Focus on cross-cutting issues including the impact of colonialism; the role of religion, ethnicity, and inequality; and Africa's engagement with globalization.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 152: History of American Law (HISTORY 352B)

(Same as LAW 318.) Modern history of American law, legal thought, legal institutions and the legal profession. Topics include law and regulation of corporate organizations and labor relations in the age of enterprise, law of race relations in the South and North, development of classical legalism, critiques of classical legalism, modern administrative state, organized legal profession, New Deal legal thought and legislation, legal order of the 50s, expansion of enterprise liability, civil rights movements from 1940, rights revolution of the Warren Court and Great Society.
Instructors: Friedman, L. (PI)

HISTORY 203D: The Holocaust in Recent Memory: Conflicts - Commemorations - Challenges (HISTORY 303D, JEWISHST 283D, JEWISHST 383D)

This course offers an in-depth approach to the study of the Holocaust as a historical point of reference for European memory, or for the memory cultures of European nations, where the international context in particular the USA and Israel will also be taken into consideration. The starting point is the transformations in Holocaust memory: after 1945, in the era of European postwar myths, the Holocaust was on the periphery of historical thinking, of scholarly and public interest. Today the Holocaust is acknowledged as a 'break in civilization', a watershed event in human history. This approach has only evolved since the 1980s.
Instructors: Uhl, H. (PI)

HISTORY 216: Women and the Book: Scribes, Artists, and Readers from Late Antiquity through the Fourteenth Century (ARTHIST 206H, FEMGEN 216, HISTORY 316)

This course examines the cultural worlds of medieval women through particular attention to the books that they owned, commissioned, and created. Beginning with the earliest Christian centuries, the course proceeds chronologically, charting women¿s book ownership, scribal and artistic activity, and patronage from Late Antiquity through the fourteenth century. In addition to examining specific manuscripts (in facsimile, or digitally), we will consider ancillary questions to do with women¿s authorship, education and literacy, reading patterns, devotional practices, and visual traditions and representation.

HISTORY 217S: Minorities In Medieval Europe (RELIGST 217X)

This course examines attitudes towards outsider groups within medieval society and the treatment of these groups by medieval Christians. Heretics, Jews, Muslims, homosexuals, prostitutes and usurers occupied ambivalent and at time dangerous positions within a society that increasingly defined itself as Christian. Differences in the treatment of these various 'outcast' groups, their depiction in art, their legal segregation, and their presumed association with demonic activity are addressed through discussion, and readings from primary and secondary source material.

HISTORY 232B: Heretics, Prostitutes and Merchants: The Venetian Empire (ITALIAN 232B)

Between 1200-1600, Venice created a powerful empire at the boundary between East and West that controlled much of the Mediterranean, with a merchant society that allowed social groups, religions, and ethnicities to coexist. Topics include the features of Venetian society, the relationship between center and periphery, order and disorder, orthodoxy and heresy, the role of politics, art, and culture in the Venetian Renaissance, and the empire's decline as a political power and reinvention as a tourist site and living museum.
Instructors: Findlen, P. (PI)
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