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11 - 20 of 70 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HISTORY 205G: Creative Political Thinking: From Machiavelli to Madison (HISTORY 305G, POLISCI 235J, POLISCI 335J)

How can we account for creativity and innovation in political thinking? Are these qualities simply a product of political expediency and rhetorical urgency, or do they also depend on qualities of mind and historical contingencies that have to be studied individually? This class will explore these questions with three noteworthy cases: Niccolo Machiavelli, John Locke, and James Madison. Extensive reading in both primary writings and secondary sources.
Instructors: Rakove, J. (PI)

HISTORY 207C: The Global Early Modern (HISTORY 307C)

In what sense can we speak of "globalization" before modernity? What are the characteristics and origins of the economic system we know as "capitalism"? When and why did European economies begin to diverge from those of other Eurasian societies? With these big questions in mind, the primary focus will be on the history of Europe and European empires, but substantial readings deal with other parts of the world, particularly China and the Indian Ocean.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 208B: Women Activists' Response to War (FEMGEN 208B, HISTORY 308B)

Theoretical issues, historical origins, changing forms of women's activism in response to war throughout the 20th century, and contemporary cases, such as the Russian Committee of Soldiers Mothers, Bosnian Mothers of Srebrenica, Serbian Women in Black, and the American Cindy Sheehan. Focus is on the U.S. and Eastern Europe, with attention to Israel, England, and Argentina.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 209C: Liberalism and Violence (HISTORY 309C)

Does LIberalism have a theory of violence? What does modern political thought, in privileging humanity and rights, share with "terrorists" and "rogue states?" How is liberalism transformed by the use of religion and death for political ends? We read key thinkers of modern life- Adorno, Arendt, Agamben, Benjamin, Derrida, Fanon, Foucault, Gandhi, Heidegger, and Schmitt- to interrogate the relationship between religion, sacrifice, and democracy. At the center are connections between war and modern life, and between violence and non-violence.
| UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kumar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 212: Knights, Monks, and Nobles: Masculinity in the Middle Ages (HISTORY 312)

This course considers masculinity as historically and culturally contingent, focusing on the experiences and representations of medieval men as heroes, eunuchs, fathers, priests, husbands, boys, and fighting men. Recognizing that the lives of men, like those of women, were governed by gendered rules and expectations, we will explore a wide range of medieval masculinities, paying close attention to the processes by which manhood could be achieved (e.g. martial, spiritual, sexual), and to competing versions of manliness, from the warrior hero of the early middle ages to the suffering Christ of late medieval religion.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 222: Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe and Russia

Explores criminal law in early modern Europe and Russia, ca 1500-1800, in law and in practice. Engages debates about use of exemplary public executions as tactic of governance, and about gradual decline in "violence" in Europe over this time. Explores practice of accusatory and inquisitory judicial procedures, judicial torture, forms of punishment, concepts of justice.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 224C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 228: Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II (HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 282, JEWISHST 382)

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 230F: Surveillance in Modern Europe (HISTORY 330F)

We will investigate the role of surveillance in modern societies -- the motives, pressures, and consequences of informal and formal systems of control from the French Revolution to the present day. Students will encounter a variety of sources and situations, analyzing the tensions between social stability and individual pursuits, and the circumstances under which these tensions can lead to state repression and violence.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

HISTORY 231E: Paper, Printing, and Digital Revolutions: Transformations of the Book (HISTORY 331E)

What is a book? This seminar explores the conceptual implications of approximately two millennia of transformations in the physical and material properties of books. How have the meaning and authority we assign the written word changed as technologies of book production and dissemination have evolved, and how have they remained continuous? Topics covered include the rise of the medieval manuscript codex, the emergence of print culture in early modern Europe, and current debates over the nature of text in the digital age.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Clark, F. (PI)
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