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1 - 10 of 70 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HISTORY 201: Introduction to Public History and Public Service (AFRICAAM 102, CSRE 201, HISTORY 301)

Gateway course for the History and Public Service interdisciplinary track. Topics include the production, presentation, and practice of public history through narratives, exhibits, web sites, and events in museums, historical sites, parks, and public service settings in nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and educational institutions. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

HISTORY 201A: The Global Drug Wars (HISTORY 301A)

Explores the global story of the struggle over drugs from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include the history of the opium wars in China, controversies over wine and tobacco in Iran, narco-trafficking and civil war in Lebanon, the Afghan 'narco-state,' Andean cocaine as a global commodity, the politics of U.S.- Mexico drug trafficking, incarceration, drugs, and race in the U.S., and the globalization of the American 'war on drugs.'
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 202: International History and International Relations Theory (HISTORY 306E, POLISCI 216E, POLISCI 316)

The relationship between history and political science as disciplines. Sources include studies by historians and political scientists on topics such as the origins of WW I, the role of nuclear weapons in international politics, the end of the Cold War, nongovernmental organizations in international relations, and change and continuity in the international system.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Holloway, D. (PI)

HISTORY 202G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 302G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 203C: History of Ignorance

Scholars pay a lot of attention to knowledge--how it arises and impacts society--but much less attention has been given to ignorance, even though its impacts are equally profound. Here we explore the political history of ignorance, through case studies including: corporate denials of harms from particular products (tobacco, asbestos), climate change denialism, and creationist rejections of Darwinian evolution. Students will be expected to produce a research paper tracing the origins and impact of a particular form of ignorance.
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 203K: Trauma and History: Intergenerational suffering and collective healing

This course will examine trauma as a historical process, following the intergenerational impacts of history's darker dramas, analyzing collective strategies for coping and healing after trauma, and asking whether we can speak of "traumatized societies." Readings for graduate students will include Ben Shephard's A War of Nerves, Didier Fassin and Richard Rechtman's The Empire of Trauma, and selections from Yael Danieli, ed., Intergenerational Handbook of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma. Colloquium will be discussion-oriented, but will also include guest discussants from around the world. The course will culminate in a conference to be held at Stanford, June 4-6: "Soul Wounds: Trauma and Healing Across Generations." Undergraduate requirements for 1 credit: Attend weekly "Mind, Body, and Culture" workshop and first hour of Wednesday morning discussion, attend some part of conference on June 4-6. Graduate requirements for 4-5 credits: Attend workshop, read weekly, discussion on Wednesday mornings, write a paper and if desired present at conference.
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 204: What is History?

An introduction to the discipline of history, designed for current or prospective History majors. Focusing on methods and theories of historical inquiry, students will learn how historians frame problems, collect and analyze evidence, and contribute to on-going debates. Through a series of case studies or exemplary works of historical study, the course will also explore different genres of historical writing (such as narrative, biography, social history) and different methodological approaches to history (such as Annales school, microhistory, and cultural history).
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 204E: Totalitarianism (HISTORY 307E)

Modern revolutionary and totalitarian politics. Sources include monographs on the medieval, Reformation, French Revolutionary, and Great War eras. Topics: the essence of modern ideology, the concept of the body national, state terror, charismatic leadership, gender assignments, private and public spheres, and identities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 204G: War and Society (HISTORY 304G)

How Western societies and cultures have responded to modern warfare. The relationship between its destructive capacity and effects on those who produce, are subject to, and must come to terms with its aftermath. Literary representations of WW I; destructive psychological effects of modern warfare including those who take pleasure in killing; changes in relations between the genders; consequences of genocidal ideology and racial prejudice; the theory of just war and its practical implementation; and how wars are commemorated.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 205F: Digital History: Concepts, Methods, Problems

Students will study the development of the relationship between the discipline of history and computing tools through a combination of theoretical and hands-on activities, and readings. Students will read leading critical works, examine seminal digital projects, and examine the works of leading digital humanities scholars. The course will introduce students to concepts and methods within digital history, including text analysis, spatial history, data visualization, and digital scholarship. The end product of the course will be a born-digital scholarly product.
Instructors: Heppler, J. (PI)
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