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81 - 90 of 170 results for: all courses

EE 114: Fundamentals of Analog Integrated Circuit Design (EE 214A)

Analysis and simulation of elementary transistor stages, current mirrors, supply- and temperature-independent bias, and reference circuits. Overview of integrated circuit technologies, circuit components, component variations and practical design paradigms. Differential circuits, frequency response, and feedback will also be covered. Performance evaluation using computer-aided design tools. Undergraduates must take EE 114 for 4 units. Prerequisite: 101B. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

EE 134: Introduction to Photonics

Photonics, optical components, and fiber optics. Conceptual and mathematical tools for design and analysis of optical communication, sensor and imaging systems. Experimental characterization of semiconductor lasers, optical fibers, photodetectors, receiver circuitry, fiber optic links, optical amplifiers, and optical sensors. Class project on confocal microscopy or other method of sensing or analyzing biometric data. Laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: EE 102A and one of the following: EE 42, Physics 43, or Physics 63.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

ENERGY 20N: Technology in the Greenhouse

The evidence that human activities are changing the climate is overwhelming. Energy use is woven throughout the fabric of modern societies, and energy systems are also a primary way that humans interact with the global Earth systems like climate. We know enough about the potential impacts of climate change to see that we need to transform the world¿s energy systems to a much cleaner set of technologies with much lower greenhouse gas emissions. Economies that use energy in a clean, cost-effective way will be much more competitive in the future. The clean energy transition is now underway, with reductions in coal use and rapid growth in solar and wind deployment, but there is much more to do to limit the adverse impacts of climate change. This seminar explores technology options available to make the changes needed, in the developed and developing worlds. There is no shortage of energy available for our use. Instead, the challenge is to convert those energy resources into services like e more »
The evidence that human activities are changing the climate is overwhelming. Energy use is woven throughout the fabric of modern societies, and energy systems are also a primary way that humans interact with the global Earth systems like climate. We know enough about the potential impacts of climate change to see that we need to transform the world¿s energy systems to a much cleaner set of technologies with much lower greenhouse gas emissions. Economies that use energy in a clean, cost-effective way will be much more competitive in the future. The clean energy transition is now underway, with reductions in coal use and rapid growth in solar and wind deployment, but there is much more to do to limit the adverse impacts of climate change. This seminar explores technology options available to make the changes needed, in the developed and developing worlds. There is no shortage of energy available for our use. Instead, the challenge is to convert those energy resources into services like electricity and transportation, and that conversion requires technology, as well as policies and markets that enable innovation. The scale of the world¿s energy systems is dauntingly large, and we will need a well-diversified set of options to meet the challenge. Wind, solar, nuclear, carbon capture and storage for fossil fuel use, modified agriculture, electric (and automated) vehicles, advanced air conditioning, and many other technology options exist. We will consider these technologies and ask what barriers will have to be addressed if they are to be deployed at a scale large enough to reduce the impact climate change. The format will be discussions of technologies and their potential with a project and student presentations toward the end of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

ENERGY 101: Energy and the Environment (EARTHSYS 101)

Energy use in modern society and the consequences of current and future energy use patterns. Case studies illustrate resource estimation, engineering analysis of energy systems, and options for managing carbon emissions. Focus is on energy definitions, use patterns, resource estimation, pollution. Recommended: MATH 21 or 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

ENERGY 104: Sustainable Energy for 9 Billion

This course explores the global transition to a sustainable global energy system. We will formulate and program simple models for future energy system pathways. We will explore the drivers of global energy demand and carbon emissions, as well as the technologies that can help us meet this demand sustainably. We will consider constraints on the large-scale deployment of technology and difficulties of a transition at large scales and over long time periods. Assignments will focus on building models of key aspects of the energy transition, including global, regional and sectoral energy demand and emissions as well as economics of change. Prerequisites: students should be comfortable with calculus and linear algebra (e.g. Math 20, Math 51) and be familiar with computer programming (e.g. CS106A, CS106B). We will use the Python programming language to build our models.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

ENGLISH 184D: Race, Gender, and Literary Digital Humanities (CSRE 184E)

This course will introduce students to the ways that the practices of literary text mining can help us to understand, study, and shape our understanding of identity. Each week, we will spend one class discussing critical works by theorists like Toni Morrison, and Linda Martín Alcoff and digital scholars like Roopika Risam and Ted Underwood; we will then spend the second class of the week learning and practicing digital methods in programs like Python and Gephi. Students do not need any programming knowledge to take this class.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

ENGLISH 184E: Literary Text Mining

This course will train students in applied methods for computationally analyzing texts for humanities research. The skills students will gain will include basic programming for textual analysis, applied statistical evaluation of results and the ability to present these results within a formal research paper or presentation. Students in the course will also learn the prerequisite steps of such an analysis including corpus selection and cleaning, metadata collection, and selecting and creating an appropriate visualization for the results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Fredner, E. (PI)

ENGR 10: Introduction to Engineering Analysis

Integrated approach to the fundamental scientific principles that are the cornerstones of engineering analysis: conservation of mass, atomic species, charge, momentum, angular momentum, energy, production of entropy expressed in the form of balance equations on carefully defined systems, and incorporating simple physical models. Emphasis is on setting up analysis problems arising in engineering. Topics: simple analytical solutions, numerical solutions of linear algebraic equations, and laboratory experiences. Provides the foundation and tools for subsequent engineering courses. Prerequisite: AP Physics and AP Calculus or equivalent.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
Instructors: Cappelli, M. (PI)

ENGR 14: Intro to Solid Mechanics

Introduction to engineering analysis using the principles of engineering solid mechanics. Builds on the math and physical reasoning concepts in Physics 41 to develop skills in evaluation of engineered systems across a variety of fields. Foundational ideas for more advanced solid mechanics courses such as ME80 or CEE101A. Interactive lecture sessions focused on mathematical application of key concepts, with weekly complementary lab session on testing and designing systems that embody these concepts. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval. Pre-requisite: Physics 41.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR

ENGR 20: Introduction to Chemical Engineering (CHEMENG 20)

Overview of chemical engineering through discussion and engineering analysis of physical and chemical processes. Topics: overall staged separations, material and energy balances, concepts of rate processes, energy and mass transport, and kinetics of chemical reactions. Applications of these concepts to areas of current technological importance: biotechnology, energy, production of chemicals, materials processing, and purification. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
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