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141 - 150 of 171 results for: all courses

PHYSICS 100: Introduction to Observational Astrophysics

Designed for undergraduate physics majors but open to all students with a calculus-based physics background and some laboratory and coding experience. Students make and analyze observations using the telescopes at the Stanford Student Observatory. Topics covered include navigating the night sky, the physics of stars and galaxies, telescope instrumentation and operation, imaging and spectroscopic techniques, quantitative error analysis, and effective scientific communication. The course concludes with an independent project where student teams propose and execute an observational astronomy project of their choosing, using techniques learned in class to gather and analyze their data, and presenting their findings in the forms of professional-style oral presentations and research papers. Enrollment by permission. To get a permission number please complete form: http://web.stanford.edu/~elva/physics100prelim.fb If you have not heard from us by the beginning of class, please come to the first class session.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 105: Intermediate Physics Laboratory I: Analog Electronics

Introductory laboratory electronics, designed for Physics and Engineering Physics majors but open to all students with science or engineering interests in analog circuits, instrumentation and signal processing. The course is focused on laboratory exercises that build skills needed for measurements, including sensors, amplification and filtering, and fundamentals of noise in physical systems. The hands-on lab exercises include DC circuits, RC and diode circuits, applications of operational amplifiers, non-linear circuits and optoelectronics. The class exercises build towards a lock-in amplifier contest where each lab section designs and builds a synchronous detection system to measure a weak optical signal, with opportunities to understand the limits of the design, build improvements and compare results with the other lab sections. The course focuses on practical techniques and insight from the lab exercises, with a goal to prepare undergraduates for laboratory research. No formal electronics experience is required beyond exposure to concepts from introductory Physics or Engineering courses (Ohm's law, charge conservation, physics of capacitors and inductors, etc.). Recommended prerequisite: Physics 43 or 63, or Engineering 40A or 40M.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 107: Intermediate Physics Laboratory II: Experimental Techniques and Data Analysis

Experiments on lasers, Gaussian optics, and atom-light interaction, with emphasis on data and error analysis techniques. Students describe a subset of experiments in scientific paper format. Prerequisites: completion of PHYSICS 40 or PHYSICS 60 series, and PHYSICS 70 and PHYSICS 105. Recommended pre- or corequisites: PHYSICS 120 and 130. WIM
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 108: Advanced Physics Laboratory: Project

Have you ever gotten to come up with a scientific question you'd like to explore, then worked with a small group to plan, design, build, and carry out an experiment to pursue this? Most projects pursued (drawn from condensed matter or particle physics) have never before been done in the class. This is an accelerated, guided "simulation" of real frontier experimental research. We provide substantial resources to help your team. Prerequisites PHYSICS 105, PHYSICS 107. PHYSICS 130 preferred.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 113: Computational Physics

Numerical methods for solving problems in mechanics, astrophysics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. Methods include numerical integration; solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations; solutions of the diffusion equation, Laplace's equation and Poisson's equation with various methods; statistical methods including Monte Carlo techniques; matrix methods and eigenvalue problems. Short introduction to Python, which is used for class examples and active learning notebooks; independent class projects make up more than half of the grade and may be programmed in any language such as C, Python or Matlab. No Prerequisites but some previous programming experience is advisable.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR

POLISCI 101: Introduction to International Relations

The course provides an introduction to major factors shaping contemporary international politics, including the distribution of power among states, ideas, and domestic regimes. The course will explore the causes of the First and Second World Wars, the Cold War, the impact of nuclear weapons, the rise of China, and external state building.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

POLISCI 104: Introduction to Comparative Politics

Why are some countries prone to civil war and violence, while others remain peaceful? Why do some countries maintain democratic systems, while others do not? Why are some countries more prosperous than others? This course will provide an overview of the most basic questions in the comparative study of political systems, and will introduce the analytical tools that can help us answer them.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

POLISCI 141A: Immigration and Multiculturalism (CSRE 141S)

What are the economic effects of immigration? Do immigrants assimilate into local culture? What drives native attitudes towards immigrants? Is diversity bad for local economies and societies and which policies work for managing diversity and multiculturalism? We will address these and similar questions by synthesizing the conclusions of a number of empirical studies on immigration and multiculturalism. The emphasis of the course is on the use of research design and statistical techniques that allow us to move beyond correlations and towards causal assessments of the effects of immigration and immigration policy.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

POLISCI 150A: Data Science for Politics (POLISCI 355A)

Data science is quickly changing the way we understand and and engage in the political process. In this course we will develop fundamental techniques of data science and apply them to large political datasets on elections, campaign finance, lobbying, and more. The objective is to give students the skills to carry out cutting edge quantitative political studies in both academia and the private sector. Students with technical backgrounds looking to study politics quantitatively are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

POLISCI 150B: Machine Learning for Social Scientists (POLISCI 355B)

Machine learning - the use of algorithms to classify, predict, sort, learn and discover from data - has exploded in use across academic fields, industry, government, and the non-profit sector. This course provides an introduction to machine learning for social scientists. We will introduce state of the art machine learning tools, show how to use those tools in the programming language R, and demonstrate why a social science focus is essential to effectively apply machine learning techniques in social, political, and policy contexts. Applications of the methods will include forecasting social phenomena, evaluating the use of algorithms in public policy, and the analysis of social media and text data. Prerequisite: POLISCI 150A/355A.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
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