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111 - 120 of 171 results for: all courses

GEOPHYS 90: Earthquakes and Volcanoes (EARTHSYS 113)

Is the "Big One" overdue in California? What kind of damage would that cause? What can we do to reduce the impact of such hazards in urban environments? Does "fracking" cause earthquakes and are we at risk? Is the United States vulnerable to a giant tsunami? The geologic record contains evidence of volcanic super eruptions throughout Earth's history. What causes these gigantic explosive eruptions, and can they be predicted in the future? This course will address these and related issues. For non-majors and potential Earth scientists. No prerequisites. More information at: https://stanford.box.com/s/zr8ar28efmuo5wtlj6gj2jbxle76r4lu
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

GEOPHYS 104: The Water Course (EARTHSYS 104, EARTHSYS 204, GEOPHYS 204)

The Central Valley of California provides a third of the produce grown in the U.S., but recent droughts and increasing demand have raised concerns about both food and water security. The pathway that water takes from rainfall to the irrigation of fields or household taps (¿the water course¿) determines the quantity and quality of the available water. Working with various data sources (measurements made on the ground, in wells, and from satellites) allows us to model the water budget in the valley and explore the recent impacts on freshwater supplies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

GEOPHYS 110: Introduction to the Foundations of Contemporary Geophysics (EARTHSYS 110)

Introduction to the foundations of contemporary geophysics. Topics drawn from broad themes in: whole Earth geodynamics, geohazards, natural resources, and environment. In each case the focus is on how the interpretation of a variety of geophysical measurements (e.g., gravity, seismology, heat flow, electromagnetics, and remote sensing) can be used to provide fundamental insight into the behavior of the Earth. The course will include a weekend field trip. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51, or co-registration in either.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

GEOPHYS 118X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

GEOPHYS 130: Introductory Seismology

Introduction to seismology including: elasticity and the wave equation, P, S, and surface waves, dispersion, ray theory, reflection and transmission of seismic waves, seismic imaging, large-scale Earth structure, earthquake location, earthquake statistics and forecasting, magnitude scales, seismic source theory.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

GEOPHYS 141: Remote Sensing of the Oceans (EARTHSYS 141, EARTHSYS 241, ESS 141, ESS 241)

How to observe and interpret physical and biological changes in the oceans using satellite technologies. Topics: principles of satellite remote sensing, classes of satellite remote sensors, converting radiometric data into biological and physical quantities, sensor calibration and validation, interpreting large-scale oceanographic features.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR

GEOPHYS 160: D^3: Disasters, Decisions, Development

This class connects the science behind natural disasters with the real-world constraints of disaster management and development. In each iteration of this class we will focus on a specific, disaster-prone location as case study. By collaborating with local stakeholders we will explore how science and engineering can make a make a difference in reducing disaster risk in the future. Offered every other year.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 51: Big Data for Biologists - Decoding Genomic Function

Biology and medicine are becoming increasingly data-intensive fields. This course is designed to introduce students interested in human biology and related fields to methods for working with large biological datasets. There will be in-class activities analyzing real data that have revealed insights about the role of the genome and epigenome in health and disease. For example, we will explore data from large-scale gene expression and chromatin state studies. The course will provide an introduction to the relevant topics in biology and to fundamental computational skills such as editing text files, formatting and storing data, visualizing data and writing data analysis scripts. Students will become familiar with both UNIX and Python. This course is designed at the introductory level. Previous university-level courses in biology and programming experience are not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

HUMBIO 88: Introduction to Statistics for the Health Sciences

Students will learn the statistical tools used to describe and analyze data in the fields of medicine and epidemiology. This very applied course will rely on current research questions and publicly available data. Students will gain proficiency with Stata to do basic analyses of health-related data, including linear and logistic regression, and will become sophisticated consumers of health-related statistical results.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR

HUMBIO 89: Introduction to Health Sciences Statistics

This course aims to provide a firm grounding in the foundations of probability and statistics, with a focus on analyzing data from the health sciences. Students will learn how to read, interpret, and critically evaluate the statistics in medical and biological studies. The course also prepares students to be able to analyze their own data, guiding them on how to choose the correct statistical test, avoid common statistical pitfalls, and perform basic functions in R deducer. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR
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