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1 - 10 of 31 results for: RELIGST ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

RELIGST 26: The Bible and its Interpreters

Introduction to major stories, figures, and themes of the Christian Bible and their retellings in theological writing, art, literature, film, and music throughout the ages.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Pitkin, B. (PI)

RELIGST 29: Religion, Violence & Nonviolence (Lecture Series)

College courses and public events often address "religion and violence"--an important topic, but one-sided. We will study ways in which religious leaders, movements, and discourses have (1) promoted violent conflict, aggression, and oppression; and (2) contributed to nonviolence, peace-building, and liberation of the oppressed. An overarching theme will be a view of religions as fields of interpretation. No religion is essentially violent or peaceful; intricately connected to the world around them, religions become what they become through interpretation and action. Each week will have two meetings: one featuring an outstanding guest lecturer and one to discuss the lecture topic, with assigned readings and films. Topics under consideration include: Buddhism and Violence; Dorothy Day and Catholic Nonviolent Resistance to Nuclear Weapons; Just War and Jihad; The Contribution of Negro Spirituals to Liberation; The Quakers: Pacifist Convictions and Activism; Violence/Nonviolence in Jainism; The Role of Christian Faith in M.L. King¿s Political Work; Spirituality and Religious Peacebuilding. Lectures series with required attendance and written reflections for 2 units; full course for 4 units please sign up for RELIGST 119.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hess, L. (PI)

RELIGST 38: Religion in the Information Age: The Modern Religious Experience in New Media and Cyberspace

In today's high-tech world, information is everywhere. We live in an age where all the knowledge ever produced, anything you could ever want to know, see, or hear, is available within a matter of seconds. Yet for all this instantly accessible information, it seems there remain questions that can¿t be solved by a simple search on Wikipedia or Google. What is life? Why are we here? Is there a higher being? What is the best way to live? These are questions that have traditionally been associated with religion¿with philosophy rather than science, with faith rather than fact. In a time when everything is immediately knowable, how does religion retain any sense of mystery? Do the ways of talking and thinking about God handed down to us from the ancient world still have any of their power, or have they grown stale, ossified and ineffective as we transform the universe into easily searchable data, into friendly sound bites and viral memes? What has become of religion in the age of information?nnThis course focuses on the concept of information as a way to examine the broader question of the role of religion in the modern world. How is religion affected by the exponential advancement of technology? How are traditional concepts like God, belief, or prayer impacted by the discoveries of science? What is the modern religious experience in this new digital age? In particular this course asks whether or not religious discourse¿the language of poetry, scripture, and everyday speech¿faces new challenges in the modern age.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Chaves, K. (PI)

RELIGST 65: Exploring Global Christianity

Explore the world¿s largest religion as a multicultural, global faith, with attention to Christianity¿s origins, spread and impact around the world up to the present. Special attention to recent shifting demographics leading to declining numbers in mainline Christian denominations in North America and Europe and the rapid expansion of Christianity in Africa, Asia, and South America; the explosion of international Pentecostalism and other new Christianities; Christianity, global politics, and the global economy; Christian-Muslim relations and conflicts.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Pitkin, B. (PI)

RELIGST 86: Exploring the New Testament (CLASSICS 43)

The New Testament is many things to many people. Around the globe, it is and has been for two millennia a source of culture, law, and faith. It has been used both to undergird battles for civil rights and to fight against them. It has been used both to justify wars and to argue that all war is unjust. Yet, many people haven¿t read the New Testament and still more haven¿t looked at it from historical, sociological, comparative and literary frameworks. This course will provide you the opportunity to read the New Testament and to study it closely. We will ask questions of the New Testament about the early Jesus movement, how it fits into its historical context and how it developed. We will look at the range of opinions and views about Jesus present in this literature. We will explore the different genres used by early Christians. We will examine how this set of Early Christian texts came to be considered the canon.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

RELIGST 104: Religion, Counterculture, and the Radical Imagination

Counterculture: A radical culture, esp. amongst the young, that rejects established social values and practices; a mode of life opposed to the conventional or dominant. Cf. alternative adj. ~ O.E.D.nnWe will critically examine contemporary and past countercultural religious movements in light of larger debates on such perennially important issues as race, politics, environmentalism, and gender. In particular, we will focus on how mysticism, myth, and the radical religious imagination are mobilized to affect real change in the sociocultural realm. We will engage primary materials such as text, film, and music: a multimedia approach that will foreground the complex strategies used to transform ideas into actions, propositions into performances. To this end, assignments will offer creative yet critical opportunities to think through the complexities of the construction of our own group and individual identities. Subject matter treated will include sex, drugs and rock & roll¿as well as polite conversations about other things normally avoided in polite conversation. No prior experience with religious studies or philosophy is necessary. All materials will be in English. Everyone is welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gentzke, J. (PI)

RELIGST 119: Religion, Violence, and Nonviolence

College courses and public events often address "religion and violence"--an important topic, but one-sided. We will study ways in which religious leaders, movements, and discourses have (1) promoted violent conflict, aggression, and oppression; and (2) contributed to nonviolence, peacebuilding, and liberation of the oppressed. An overarching theme will be a view of religions as fields of interpretation. No religion is essentially violent or peaceful; intricately connected to the world around them, religions become what they become through interpretation and action. Each week will have two meetings: one featuring an outstanding guest lecturer and one to discuss the lecture topic, with assigned readings and films. Topics under consideration include: Buddhism and Violence; Dorothy Day and Catholic Nonviolent Resistance to Nuclear Weapons; Just War and Jihad; The Contribution of Negro Spirituals to Liberation; The Quakers: Pacifist Convictions and Activism; Violence/Nonviolence in Jainism; The Role of Christian Faith in M.L. King's Political Work; Spirituality and Religious Peacebuilding. For lecture series with required attendance and written reflections for 2 units, take RELIGST 29.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

RELIGST 135: Islam in America

This course explores the history of Islam in North America with special emphasis on the experience of Muslims in the United States. Contrary to popularly held belief, Muslims have been critical participants in the construction of American identity from the 16th century onwards when Muslim slaves were forcibly brought to Colonial America. Our course will explore the diverse ways Muslims in America have imagined, practiced, and negotiated their religious identity. We will move chronologically, and we will focus upon three crucial themes: the convergence of constructions of racial, religious, and national identities in America; the ever-shifting terrain of notions of authority and authenticity amongst Muslims in America; and global resonances of the practices and ideas of American Muslims.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sherman, W. (PI)

RELIGST 171A: Biblical Greek (CLASSICS 6G, JEWISHST 5)

(Formerly CLASSGRK 5.) This is a one term intensive class in Biblical Greek. After quickly learning the basics of the language, we will then dive right into readings from the New Testament and the Septuagint, which is the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. No previous knowledge of Greek required. If demand is high for a second term, an additional quarter will be offered in the Spring.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ten-Hove, E. (PI)

RELIGST 181: Heidegger and Daoism: Differences and Dialogue (PHIL 133S)

The new paradigm for understanding Heidegger makes possible a fresh look at his long-standing interest in Daoism. Part One: a radical recasting of Heidegger's thought, including his readings of the Presocratics (6th century BCE). In light of that, Part Two: a reading of Laozi's Dao De Jing / Tao Te Ching (6th century BCE). Permission of instructor required.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sheehan, T. (PI)
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