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11 - 20 of 76 results for: RELIGST ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

RELIGST 56: Exploring Chinese Religions

An overview of major themes and historical developments in 5000 years of Chinese religion. In this course, we will try as much as possible to appreciate Chinese religion from the Chinese perspective, paying particular attention to original texts in translation in an attempt to discern the logic of Chinese religion and the role it has played in the course of Chinese history. To a greater extent perhaps than any other civilization, Chinese have left behind a continuous body of written documents and other artifacts relating to religion stretching over thousands of years, providing a wealth of material for studying the place of religion in history and society.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Tuzzeo, D. (PI)

RELIGST 61: Exploring Islam

This course introduces some of the most important features of the Islamic religious tradition. It explores the different ways in which Muslims have interpreted and practiced their religion. The main subjects of discussion --- including the life of the Prophet Muhammad, the Qur'an, law, ritual, mysticism, theology, politics, and art --- will be considered with reference to their proper historical contexts. Some of the topics covered include abortion, gender, rebellion and violence, and the visual vocabulary of paintings. Students will be exposed to important theories and methods in the academic study of religion. No prior knowledge is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Bigelow, A. (PI)

RELIGST 114: Yoga: Ancient and Modern

In both Western popular culture and the Indian political arena, Yoga has become emblematic of the cultural heritage of India. But how did the phenomenon that is global postural yoga, with its secular wellness ethos and athleticism, come into existence? And how does it relate to the contemplative and ascetic disciplines that were practiced in the premodern Indian past? This course explores the early history of yoga through its philosophy and esoteric practices, concluding with a look at the ramifications of yoga in contemporary culture and politics. Participating in a yoga class is recommended. 2 units of independent study (S-NC) are offered for those who participate in a weekly yoga class and write short reflections on the experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

RELIGST 116: Buddhist Philosophy

What do Buddhists mean when they argue that there is "no self?" What about their claim that everything is "empty?" Is their theory of karma a type of "fatalism" (that everything is just a matter of predetermined fate)? Does Buddhism really teach that we are all connected with one another? This course aims to answer these questions, and many others related to Buddhist philosophy. We will begin by exploring the central philosophical arguments attributed to the historical Buddha, and study the major philosophical traditions of Buddhism and the debates between them over the issues of metaphysics (what is really real?), ethics (what should we do?), and epistemology (what and how do we know?). We will also learn about the problems and significance of the modern interpretations of Buddhist philosophy. Through these discussions, we will attempt to critically appreciate both the universality and the particularity of the Buddhist ways of thinking.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

RELIGST 119: Religion and Conflict

What is the relationship between religion and conflict? Can religious movements, ideologies, and actors cause conflicts or make them better or worse? This course looks at theories of religion and conflict, religious approaches to conflict resolution or peacebuilding, and examines case studies of conflicts involving religion.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
Instructors: Bigelow, A. (PI)

RELIGST 128: Women and Gender in Early Judaism and Christianity

Beginning with the Hebrew Bible and New Testament, we will explore female figures in early Jewish and Christian literatures, such as Eve, Ruth, Mary, and Junia. Based on this, we will probe the prescriptions for female comportment in early Judaism and Christianity placing these literary prescriptions in conversation with material evidence related to women, such as for example the Babatha archive. We will analyze the politics of patriarchy in ancient discourse, and examine, among other topics, efforts by Christian clergy to silence female prophets in the second and third centuries CE. The bulk of the course will be devoted to the formative years of both Judaism and Christianity in Late Antiquity. This course assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the Bible, or ancient history. It is designed for students who are part of faith traditions that consider the Bible to be sacred, as well as those who are not. Ancient readings in this course will be supplemented by modern scholarship in classics, early Christian studies, gender studies, queer studies, and the history of sexuality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

RELIGST 144: John Calvin and Christian Faith

Close reading and analysis of Calvin's Institutes of the Christian Religion as a classic expression of Christian belief.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Pitkin, B. (PI)

RELIGST 147: Building Heaven and Hell

How did early Jews and Christians imagine space? How did they construct heaven and hell through their written texts? Can we take their written images of the earthly and heavenly Jerusalem and her temple, such as those found in Ezekiel, the Book of Revelation and the Apocalypse of Paul and transform them into three-dimensional space? We are going to try! We will meet in architecture studio and literally build with these images from foam board and hot glue. A number of themes will emerge through the course: the relationship between text and imagined space, the shifting dimensions of otherworldly visions, the connection between space and ritual, and the centrality of Jerusalem in Jewish and Christian thought.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Copeland, K. (PI)

RELIGST 149: Mysticism, Free Love, and New Religious Communities: The Rise of Utopianism

During the nineteenth-century, the ways one might pursue transcendent wisdom vastly expanded and were increasingly a matter of personal choice. New religious movements such as the American Shakers, reactions against religious institutions such as the rise of atheism, the creation of syncretic religions such as theosophy, as well as the combination of religious expression and scientific discourse in practices such as the spiritualist séance made this an era of profound religious experimentation. But challenges to traditional religious expression not only consisted of new beliefs, they also led to innovative forms of community. While exploring how an incredibly diverse set of utopian communities emerged from this new mixture of beliefs and practices, we will encounter diaries from the polyamorous Oneida community, séance accounts of astral travel, a ¿Sister of the New Life¿ living in a neighborhood in Santa Rosa, California modeled off the fairy land she thought inhabited her body, femin more »
During the nineteenth-century, the ways one might pursue transcendent wisdom vastly expanded and were increasingly a matter of personal choice. New religious movements such as the American Shakers, reactions against religious institutions such as the rise of atheism, the creation of syncretic religions such as theosophy, as well as the combination of religious expression and scientific discourse in practices such as the spiritualist séance made this an era of profound religious experimentation. But challenges to traditional religious expression not only consisted of new beliefs, they also led to innovative forms of community. While exploring how an incredibly diverse set of utopian communities emerged from this new mixture of beliefs and practices, we will encounter diaries from the polyamorous Oneida community, séance accounts of astral travel, a ¿Sister of the New Life¿ living in a neighborhood in Santa Rosa, California modeled off the fairy land she thought inhabited her body, feminist advocates of free love, and theological treatises insisting that spiritual progress could only be understood scientifically. Diverse sources such as these will help us investigate the connection between nineteenth-century religious innovation and emerging progressive movements that continue to influence us today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

RELIGST 150: Humanities Core: Texts that Changed the World -- The Ancient Middle East (COMPLIT 31, DLCL 31, HUMCORE 31)

This course traces the story of the cradle of human civilization. We will start from the earliest human stories, the Gilgamesh Epos and biblical literature, and follow the path of the development of religion, philosophy and literature in the ancient Mediterranean or Middle Eastern world.We will pose questions about how different we are today. What are our foundational stories and myths and ideas? Should we remain connected in deep ways to the most ancient past of civilization, or seek to distance ourselves from those origins? N.B. This is the first of three courses in the Middle Eastern track. These courses offer a UNIQUE opportunity to study Middle Eastern history and culture, past and present. Take one, two or all three courses to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
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