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31 - 39 of 39 results for: PUBLPOL ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PUBLPOL 302B: Economic Analysis of Law

(Same as LAW 7502.) This course will provide a broad overview of the scholarly field known as "law and economics." The focus will be on how legal rules and institutions can correct market failures. We will discuss the economic function of contracts and, when contracts fail or are not feasible, the role of legal remedies to resolve disputes. We will also discuss at some length the choice between encouraging private parties to initiate legal actions to correct externalities and governmental actors, such as regulatory authorities. Extensive attention will be given to the economics of litigation, and to how private incentives to bring lawsuits differs from the social value of litigation. The economic motive to commit crimes, and the optimal governmental response to crime, will be studied in depth. Specific topics within the preceding broad themes include: the Coase Theorem; the tradeoff between the certainty and severity of punishment; the choice between ex ante and ex post sanctions; neg more »
(Same as LAW 7502.) This course will provide a broad overview of the scholarly field known as "law and economics." The focus will be on how legal rules and institutions can correct market failures. We will discuss the economic function of contracts and, when contracts fail or are not feasible, the role of legal remedies to resolve disputes. We will also discuss at some length the choice between encouraging private parties to initiate legal actions to correct externalities and governmental actors, such as regulatory authorities. Extensive attention will be given to the economics of litigation, and to how private incentives to bring lawsuits differs from the social value of litigation. The economic motive to commit crimes, and the optimal governmental response to crime, will be studied in depth. Specific topics within the preceding broad themes include: the Coase Theorem; the tradeoff between the certainty and severity of punishment; the choice between ex ante and ex post sanctions; negligence versus strict liability; property rules; remedies for breach of contract; and the American rule versus the English rule for allocating litigation costs. Because this course is taught jointly with Law 7502 in the Law School, it will not be mathematically oriented; there are no prerequisites to take the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 303D: Applied Econometrics for Public Policy

This course aims to present the theory and practice of empirical research in economics with particular emphasis on topics relating to public policy questions. We will start with basic regression analysis and introduce the statistical software STATA. The course will put a substantial amount of effort on work with STATA in analyzing actual data sets, reproducing and criticizing results in scientific research and learning the actual practice of econometrics. We will focus on the identification of causal effects and the various econometric techniques available to learn about causality. While this is primarily a methodology module, most examples and applications will be drawn from the area of public policy. The final will be a 3-5 hour take-home exam. Prerequisite: Econ 102A.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 309: Practicum

Applied policy exercises in various fields. Multidisciplinary student teams apply skills to a contemporary problem in a major policy exercise with a public sector client such as a government agency. Problem analysis, interaction with the client and experts, and presentations. Emphasis is on effective written and oral communication to lay audiences of recommendations based on policy analysis.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 309X: Public Policy Research Project

Supervised research internship. Individual students perform policy research for outside client, applying analytical skills from core curriculum. Requires permission of program director.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Nation, J. (PI)

PUBLPOL 310: Master of Arts Thesis

Restricted to students writing a master's thesis in Public Policy. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 311: Public Policy Colloquium

Weekly colloquia speaker series required for M.P.P. and M.A. in Public Policy students. Themes vary each quarter. Open only to Public Policy graduate students; permission number required to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PUBLPOL 315: Practical Training

Qualified Public Policy students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. Prior to enrolling students must get internship approved by the Public Policy Program. At the start of the quarter, students must submit a one page statement showing the relevance of the employment to the degree program along with an offer letter. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PUBLPOL 319: Legislation

(Same as Law 7048) Lawyers work in a legal system largely defined by statutes, and constantly shaped by the application of legislative power. This course is about statutes and the legislative institutions that create them. It discusses some of the key laws governing access to legislative power and the procedures that culminate in the production of statutes in the legislature. The course is divided into two parts. The first part will focus on the acquisition of legislative power. Key topics include bribery laws, lobbying and indirect influence on legislative activity, and campaign finance regulations. The second part will focus on the exercise of legislative power. Through a number of public policy case studies, students will better understand the organization of the U.S. Congress, the ways in which power is exercised in that institution, and the intersection between politics, the law, and policymaking. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Chen, L. (PI)

PUBLPOL 801: TGR Project

Instructor and program consent required prior to enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Grading: TGR
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