2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 69 results for: ME ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ME 13N: The Great Principle of Similitude

Basic rules of dimensional analysis were proposed by Sir Isaac Newton. Lord Rayleigh called the method ¿The Great Principle of Similitude.¿ On its surface, it is a look at the relationships between physical quantities which uses their basic ¿units¿. In fact, it is a powerful and formalized method to analyze complex physical phenomena, including those for which we cannot pose, much less solve, governing equations. The method is also valuable to engineers and scientist as it helps perform back-of-the-envelope estimates and derive scaling laws for the design of machines and processes. The principle has been applied successfully to the study of complex phenomena in biology, aerodynamics, chemistry, sports, astrophysics, and forensics, among other areas. In this course, the students will be provided with the basic tools to perform such flexible and powerful analyses. We will then review particular example analyses. These will include estimating the running speed of a hungry tyrannosaurus rex, a comparison of the flights of mosquitos and jet airliners, the cost of submarines, and the energy released by an atomic weapon. We will then work together as a class to identify problems in everyday life and/or current world events to analyze with this powerful tool.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Santiago, J. (PI)

ME 14N: How Stuff Is Made

The design and engineering of products and processes, such as machining, fabric, food, and electrical goods. Tradeoffs in choice of materials, features, and process selection. Final project: students research and redesign the engineering and manufacturing aspects of a product and its processes with an eye toward sustainability. Includes several field trips to manufacturing facilities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Pruitt, B. (PI)

ME 18Q: Teamology: Creative Teams and Individual Development

Preference to sophomores. Roles on a problem solving team that best suit individual creative characteristics. Two teams are formed for teaching experientially how to develop less conscious abilities from teammates creative in those roles. Reinforcement teams have members with similar personalities; problem solving teams are composed of people with maximally different personalities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Wilde, D. (PI)

ME 70: Introductory Fluids Engineering

Elements of fluid mechanics as applied to engineering problems. Equations of motion for incompressible ideal flow. Hydrostatics. Control volume laws for mass, momentum, and energy. Bernoulli equation. Dimensional analysis and similarity. Flow in ducts. Boundary layer flows. Lift and drag. Lab experiment demonstrations. Prerequisites: ENGR 14 and 30.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

ME 80: Mechanics of Materials

Mechanics of materials and deformation of structural members. Topics include stress and deformation analysis under axial loading, torsion and bending, column buckling and pressure vessels. Introduction to stress transformation and multiaxial loading. Prerequisite: ENGR 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

ME 101: Visual Thinking

Lecture/lab. Visual thinking and language skills are developed and exercised in the context of solving design problems. Exercises for the mind's eye. Rapid visualization and prototyping with emphasis on fluent and flexible idea production. The relationship between visual thinking and the creative process. Limited enrollment. Attend the first day of class.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE

ME 103D: Engineering Drawing and Design

Designed to accompany 203. The fundamentals of engineering drawing including orthographic projection, dimensioning, sectioning, exploded and auxiliary views, assembly drawings, and SolidWorks. Homework drawings are of parts fabricated by the student in the lab. Assignments in 203 supported by material in 103D and sequenced on the assumption that the student is enrolled in both courses simultaneously.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1

ME 104B: Designing Your Life

The course employs a design thinking approach to help students develop a point of view about their career. The course focuses on an introduction to design thinking, the integration of work and worldview, and practices that support vocation formation. Includes seminar-style discussions, role-playing, short writing assignments, guest speakers, and individual mentoring and coaching. Open to juniors, seniors and 5th year coterms, all majors. Offered in two formats: 10-week class (2-units), or workshop (1-unit). See section notes for details. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourlife.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

ME 104S: Designing Your Stanford (EDUC 118S)

DYS uses a Design Thinking approach to help Freshmen and Sophomores learn practical tools and ideas to make the most of their Stanford experience. Topics include the purpose of college, major selection, educational wayfinding, and innovating college outcomes - all applied through an introduction to Design Thinking. This seminar class incorporates small group discussion, in-class activities, field exercises, personal reflection, and individual coaching. Admission to be confirmed by email to Axess registered students prior to first class session. More information at www.designingyourstanford.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

ME 110: Design Sketching

Freehand sketching, rendering, and design development. Students develop a design sketching portfolio for review by program faculty. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints