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131 - 140 of 295 results for: ME

ME 297: Forecasting for Innovators:Technology, Tools & Social Change

Technologies from the steam engine to the microprocessor have been mixed gifts, at once benefitting humankind and creating many of the problems facing humanity today. This class will explore how innovators can use forecasting methods to identify new challenges, develop responsive innovations and anticipate unintended consequences. Students will produce a long-range forecast project, applying a variety of methodologies including research, expert interviews and graphical exploration.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 298: Silversmithing and Design

Skills involved in working with precious metals at a small scale. The course gives equal attention to design and the techniques involved in investment casting.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 299A: Practical Training

For master's students. Educational opportunities in high technology research and development labs in industry. Students engage in internship work and integrate that work into their academic program. Following internship work, students complete a research report outlining work activity, problems investigated, key results, and follow-up projects they expect to perform. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship/employment and faculty sponsorship. Register under faculty sponsor's section number. All paperwork must be completed by student and faculty sponsor, as the Student Services Office does not sponsor CPT. Students are allowed only two quarters of CPT per degree program. Course may be repeated twice.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Adams, J. (PI) ; Andriacchi, T. (PI) ; Banerjee, B. (PI) ; Barnett, D. (PI) ; Bazant, M. (PI) ; Beach, D. (PI) ; Bowman, C. (PI) ; Bradshaw, P. (PI) ; Burnett, W. (PI) ; Cai, W. (PI) ; Camarillo, D. (PI) ; Cantwell, B. (PI) ; Cappelli, M. (PI) ; Carryer, E. (PI) ; Carter, D. (PI) ; Chang, F. (PI) ; Chaudhuri, O. (PI) ; Cho, K. (PI) ; Cutkosky, M. (PI) ; Darve, E. (PI) ; Dauskardt, R. (PI) ; DeBra, D. (PI) ; Delp, S. (PI) ; Durbin, P. (PI) ; Eaton, J. (PI) ; Edwards, C. (PI) ; Enge, P. (PI) ; Farhat, C. (PI) ; Gerdes, J. (PI) ; Goodson, K. (PI) ; Hanson, R. (PI) ; Harris, J. (PI) ; Harris, J. (PI) ; Homsy, G. (PI) ; Hughes, T. (PI) ; Iaccarino, G. (PI) ; Ihme, M. (PI) ; Ishii, K. (PI) ; Jameson, A. (PI) ; Johnston, J. (PI) ; Kasevich, M. (PI) ; Kelley, D. (PI) ; Kelly, M. (PI) ; Kembel, G. (PI) ; Kenny, T. (PI) ; Khatib, O. (PI) ; Kovacs, G. (PI) ; Kruger, C. (PI) ; Kuhl, E. (PI) ; Latombe, J. (PI) ; Leifer, L. (PI) ; Lele, S. (PI) ; Lentink, D. (PI) ; Levenston, M. (PI) ; Lew, A. (PI) ; MacDonald, E. (PI) ; Majumdar, A. (PI) ; Mani, A. (PI) ; Milroy, C. (PI) ; Mitchell, R. (PI) ; Mitiguy, P. (PI) ; Moin, P. (PI) ; Monismith, S. (PI) ; Mungal, M. (PI) ; Nelson, D. (PI) ; Niemeyer, G. (PI) ; Okamura, A. (PI) ; Pianetta, P. (PI) ; Pinsky, P. (PI) ; Pitsch, H. (PI) ; Powell, J. (PI) ; Prinz, F. (PI) ; Pruitt, B. (PI) ; Rock, S. (PI) ; Roth, B. (PI) ; Salisbury, J. (PI) ; Santiago, J. (PI) ; Shaqfeh, E. (PI) ; Sheppard, S. (PI) ; Sherby, O. (PI) ; Springer, G. (PI) ; Street, B. (PI) ; Tang, S. (PI) ; Taylor, C. (PI) ; Toye, G. (PI) ; Tsai, S. (PI) ; Waldron, K. (PI) ; Wang, H. (PI) ; Zheng, X. (PI)

ME 299B: Practical Training

For Ph.D. students. Educational opportunities in high technology research and development labs in industry. Students engage in internship work and integrate that work into their academic program. Following internship work, students complete a research report outlining work activity, problems investigated, key results, and follow-up projects they expect to perform. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship/employment and faculty sponsorship. Register under faculty sponsor's section number. All paperwork must be completed by student and faculty sponsor, as the student services office does not sponsor CPT. Students are allowed only two quarters of CPT per degree program. Course may be repeated twice.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 300A: Linear Algebra with Application to Engineering Computations (CME 200)

Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 300B: Partial Differential Equations in Engineering (CME 204)

Geometric interpretation of partial differential equation (PDE) characteristics; solution of first order PDEs and classification of second-order PDEs; self-similarity; separation of variables as applied to parabolic, hyperbolic, and elliptic PDEs; special functions; eigenfunction expansions; the method of characteristics. If time permits, Fourier integrals and transforms, Laplace transforms. Prerequisite: CME 200/ ME 300A, equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 300C: Introduction to Numerical Methods for Engineering (CME 206)

Numerical methods from a user's point of view. Lagrange interpolation, splines. Integration: trapezoid, Romberg, Gauss, adaptive quadrature; numerical solution of ordinary differential equations: explicit and implicit methods, multistep methods, Runge-Kutta and predictor-corrector methods, boundary value problems, eigenvalue problems; systems of differential equations, stiffness. Emphasis is on analysis of numerical methods for accuracy, stability, and convergence. Introduction to numerical solutions of partial differential equations; Von Neumann stability analysis; alternating direction implicit methods and nonlinear equations. Prerequisites: CME 200/ ME 300A, CME 204/ ME 300B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 301: LaunchPad:Design and Launch your Product or Service

This is an intense course in product design and development offered to graduate students only (no exceptions). In just ten weeks, we will apply principles of design thinking to the real-life challenge of imagining, prototyping, testing and iterating, building, pricing, marketing, distributing and selling your product or service. You will work hard on both sides of your brain. You will experience the joy of success and the (passing) pain of failure along the way. This course is an excellent chance to practice design thinking in a demanding, fast-paced, results-oriented group with support from faculty and industry leaders. This course may change your life. We will treat each team and idea as a real start-up, so the work will be intense. If you do not have a passionate and overwhelming urge to start a business or launch a product or service, this class will not be a fit. Teams must visit office hours in winter quarter (Tuesdays 2:30p-4:00p) in order to be considered for the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 302: The Future of the Automobile

This quarter, the seminar will take a specific focus on "Advanced Driver Assistance Systems", which help drivers to maneuver their vehicles through traffic. Those systems range from navigation systems, adaptive cruise control, night vision, lane departure warning over automated parking, traffic jam assistance, to self-driving cars. With this breadth of applications, advanced driver assistance systems play an important role in making traffic safer, more efficient, and more enjoyable. This course, lectured by an industry expert, will introduce students to technology behind the systems, the benefits, challenges, and future perspectives of this exciting field. At the end of the quarter, students will have developed a technical understanding as well as an understanding for the interactions of the technology, business, and society with a specific automotive focus.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 302A: Introduction to Automotive and Transportation Innovation at Stanford

The objective of this course is to survey the innovative automotive and transportation community within Stanford. Stanford University has become one of the best universities on earth to to change the future of transportation and this course is a 'who's who' of that world. This is the first part of a 3-quarter seminar series, which build on one another but can be taken independently. This quarter, the seminar will feature talks from Stanford experts in focus areas as varied as autonomous vehicles, entrepreneurship, design, ethics, aerodynamics, neuroscience, communications and security. At the end of the quarter, students will have developed an understanding of Stanford's portfolio of transportation work and know the specific individuals who are key to its future. To obtain credit, students must attend the first class (no exceptions) plus 7 additional classes for a total of 8 classes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Zoepf, S. (PI)
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