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121 - 130 of 295 results for: ME

ME 280: Skeletal Development and Evolution (BIOE 280)

The mechanobiology of skeletal growth, adaptation, regeneration, and aging is considered from developmental and evolutionary perspectives. Emphasis is on the interactions between mechanical and chemical factors in the regulation of connective tissue biology. Prerequisites: BIO 42, and ME 80 or BIOE 42.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 281: Biomechanics of Movement (BIOE 281)

Experimental techniques to study human and animal movement including motion capture systems, EMG, force plates, medical imaging, and animation. The mechanical properties of muscle and tendon, and quantitative analysis of musculoskeletal geometry. Projects and demonstrations emphasize applications of mechanics in sports, orthopedics, and rehabilitation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Delp, S. (PI)

ME 283: Introduction to Biomechanics and Mechanobiology

Introduction to the application of mechanical engineering analysis to understand human physiology and disease. Topics include basics of musculoskeletal force analysis, cell mechanics, blood flow, and mechanical behaviors of tissues. Undergraduates should have taken ME 70 and ME 80 or equivalents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 284B: Cardiovascular Bioengineering (BIOE 284B)

Continuation of ME/ BIOE 284A. Integrative cardiovascular physiology, blood fluid mechanics, and transport in the microcirculation. Sensing, feedback, and control of the circulation. Overview of congenital and adult cardiovascular disease, diagnostic methods, and treatment strategies. Engineering principles to evaluate the performance of cardiovascular devices and the efficacy of treatment strategies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 285: Computational Modeling in the Cardiovascular System (BIOE 285, CME 285)

This course introduces computational modeling methods for cardiovascular blood flow and physiology. Topics in this course include analytical and computational methods for solutions of flow in deformable vessels, one-dimensional equations of blood flow, cardiovascular anatomy, lumped parameter models, vascular trees, scaling laws, biomechanics of the circulatory system, and 3D patient specific modeling with finite elements; course will provide an overview of the diagnosis and treatment of adult and congenital cardiovascular diseases and review recent research in the literature in a journal club format. Students will use SimVascular software to do clinically-oriented projects in patient specific blood flow simulations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Marsden, A. (PI)

ME 287: Mechanics of Biological Tissues

Introduction to the mechanical behaviors of biological tissues in health and disease. Overview of experimental approaches to evaluating tissue properties and mathematical constitutive models. Elastic behaviors of hard tissues, nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic models for soft tissues.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 289A: Interactive Art / Performance Design (TAPS 289A)

This class is for those who want the experience of designing and creating interactive art and performance pieces for public audiences, using design thinking as the method, and supported by guest speakers, artist studio visits and needfinding trips to music festivals, museums and performances.nnDrawing on the fields of design, art, performance, and engineering, each student will ideate, design, plan and lead a team to build an interactive art and/or performance piece to be showcased to audience of 5000 at the Frost Music and Art Festival held on the Stanford campus on May 17th 2014. Projects can range from interactive art to unconventional set design, and from site-specific sculpture to immersive performance.nnThis is a two-quarter long commitment during which students will first learn the design, planning, story boarding, budgeting, engineering, proposal creation and concept pitching of projects for applying for grants and presenting to funders. The second quarter will concentrate on prototyping, maquette making, testing, team forming, project management, creative leadership, construction, site installation and documentation.nPart one of a two course series: ME 289A&B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 289B: Interactive Art / Performance Creation (TAPS 289B)

This class is the continuation of ME289A where students experience the designing and creating of interactive art and performance pieces for public audiences, using design thinking as the method, and supported by guest speakers, artist studio visits and needfinding trips to music festivals, museums and performances.nnDrawing on the fields of design, art, performance, and engineering, each student will ideate, design, plan and lead a team to build an interactive art and/or performance piece to be showcased to audience of 5000 at the Frost Music and Art Festival held on the Stanford campus on May 17th 2014. Projects can range from interactive art to unconventional set design, and from site-specific sculpture to immersive performance.nnDuring this second quarter students will concentrate on prototyping, maquette making, testing, team forming, project management, creative leadership, construction, site installation and documentation.nPart two of a two course series : ME 289A&B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 290: GIVE BIG OR GO HOME

When individuals or organizations attempt to solve social problems by giving money, they often overlook the people at the center of the situation. The bigger the problem, the more removed the donors or funding institutions become from the human experience. You will learn how to use human centered design to shape your giving, while also considering the roles of larger systems. Students will learn design thinking methods, how to conceptualize a system in which you want to make a difference, and creative ways to think about financing change.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 292: Humanize My Ride: Investigations in User-Centric Vehicle Design

Humanize My Ride is vehicle design for the extreme user. We will explore the relationship between specialized vehicles and their user¿s needs to inform a deep dive into designing and prototyping a unique purpose modified ride for a new type of user. Utilizing the designing thinking approach and emerging technology such as Google GLASS, student teams will interview drivers and users of specific purpose cars and trucks and then choose a new user to design and build for. Teams will work collectively on different elements of one vehicle to test with their user¿s needs. This project-based course is accessible to students of all backgrounds interested in exploring and transforming the intersection of user-centric design, automotive technology, creative customization and hands-on building.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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