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201 - 210 of 296 results for: ME

ME 331A: Advanced Dynamics & Computation

Newton, Euler, momentum, and road-map methods and computational tools for 3-D force and motion analysis of multibody systems. Power, work, and energy. Numerical solutions (e.g., MATLAB, etc.) of nonlinear algebraic and differential equations governing the static and dynamic behavior of multiple degree of freedom systems.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Mitiguy, P. (PI)

ME 332: Introduction to Computational Mechanics (CME 232)

Provides an introductory overview of modern computational methods for problems arising primarily in mechanics of solids and is intended for students from various engineering disciplines. The course reviews the basic theory of linear solid mechanics and introduces students to the important concept of variational forms, including the principle of minimum potential energy and the principles of virtual work. Specific model problems that will be considered include deformation of bars, beams and membranes, plates, and problems in plane elasticity (plane stress, plane strain, axisymmetric elasticity). The variational forms of these problems are used as the starting point for developing the finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) approaches ­ providing an important connection between mechanics and computational methods.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Pinsky, P. (PI)

ME 333: Mechanics

Goal is a common basis for advanced mechanics courses. Introduction to variation calculus. Formulation of the governing equations from a Lagrangian perspective for finite and infinite dimensional mechanical systems. Examples include systems of particles and linear elastic solids. Introduction to tensors. Definition and interpretation of Cauchy stress tenor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 333B: Mechanics - Elasticity and Inelasticity

Introduction to the theories of elasticity, plasticity and fracture and their applications. Elasticity: Definition of stress, strain, and elastic energy; equilibrium and compatibility conditions; and formulation of boundary value problems. Stress function approach to solve 2D elasticity problems and Green’s function approach in 3D. Applications to contact and crack. Plasticity: Yield surface, associative flow rule, strain hardening models, crystal plasticity models. Applications to plastic bending, torsion and pressure vessels. Fracture: Linear elastic fracture mechanics, J-integral, Dugdale-Barrenblatt crack model. Applications to brittle fracture and fatigue crack growth. Computer programming in Matlab is used to aid analytic derivation and numerical solutions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cai, W. (PI)

ME 335C: Finite Element Analysis

Newton's method for nonlinear problems; convergence, limit points and bifurcation; consistent linearization of nonlinear variational forms by directional derivative; tangent operator and residual vector; variational formulation and finite element discretization of nonlinear boundary value problems (e.g. nonlinear heat equation, nonlinear elasticity); enhancements of Newton's method: line-search techniques, quasi-Newton and arc-length methods.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pinsky, P. (PI)

ME 337: Mechanics of Growth

Introduction to continuum theory and computational simulation of living matter. Kinematics of finite growth. Balance equations in open system thermodynamics. Constitutive equations for living systems. Custom-designed finite element solution strategies. Analytical solutions for simple model problems. Numerical solutions for clinically relevant problems such as: bone remodeling; wound healing; tumor growth; atherosclerosis; heart failure; tissue expansion; and high performance training.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kuhl, E. (PI)

ME 338B: Continuum Mechanics

Constitutive theory; equilibrium constitutive relations; material frame indifference and material symmetry; finite elasticity; formulation of the boundary value problem; linearization and well-posedness; symmetries and configurational forces; numerical considerations.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 340: Theory and Applications of Elasticity

This course provides an introduction to the elasticity theory and its application to material structures at microscale. The basic theory includes the definition of stress, strain and elastic energy; equilibrium and compatibility conditions; and the formulation of boundary value problems. We will mainly discuss the stress function method to solve 2D problems and will briefly discuss the Green's function approach for 3D problems. The theory and solution methods are then applied to contact problems as well as microscopic defects in solids, such as voids, inclusions, cracks, and dislocations. Computer programming in Matlab is used to aid analytic derivation and numerical solutions of elasticity problems.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 342: Theory and Application of Inelasticity

Theories of plasticity and fracture phenomena from both phenomenological and micromechanical viewpoints. Yield surface, flow rules, strain hardening models, and applications to creep. Plastic zone near crack tip. Linear fracture mechanics and other criteria for crack initiation and growth. Application to fatigue. Classical analytic solutions will be discussed together with numerical solutions of plane elastoplatic problems by Matlab.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 342A: Mechanobiology and Biofabrication Methods (BIOPHYS 342A)

Review of current cell mechanobiology topics and methods for controlling and assessing the biomechanics of living systems. Practice and theory of design and fabrication of devices for cell mechanobiology. Limited enrollment. NOTE: Compressed schedule starts 7/21 with Tu/Th lecture 10-12 in Weeks 1 and 3, and labs 9-5 (with lunch break) in Weeks 2 and 4.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pruitt, B. (PI)
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