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171 - 180 of 296 results for: ME

ME 289B: Interactive Art / Performance Creation (TAPS 289B)

This class is the continuation of ME289A where students experience the designing and creating of interactive art and performance pieces for public audiences, using design thinking as the method, and supported by guest speakers, artist studio visits and needfinding trips to music festivals, museums and performances.nnDrawing on the fields of design, art, performance, and engineering, each student will ideate, design, plan and lead a team to build an interactive art and/or performance piece to be showcased to audience of 5000 at the Frost Music and Art Festival held on the Stanford campus on May 17th 2014. Projects can range from interactive art to unconventional set design, and from site-specific sculpture to immersive performance.nnDuring this second quarter students will concentrate on prototyping, maquette making, testing, team forming, project management, creative leadership, construction, site installation and documentation.nPart two of a two course series : ME 289A&B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 290: GIVE BIG OR GO HOME

When individuals or organizations attempt to solve social problems by giving money, they often overlook the people at the center of the situation. The bigger the problem, the more removed the donors or funding institutions become from the human experience. You will learn how to use human centered design to shape your giving, while also considering the roles of larger systems. Students will learn design thinking methods, how to conceptualize a system in which you want to make a difference, and creative ways to think about financing change.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 292: Humanize My Ride: Investigations in User-Centric Vehicle Design

Humanize My Ride is vehicle design for the extreme user. We will explore the relationship between specialized vehicles and their user¿s needs to inform a deep dive into designing and prototyping a unique purpose modified ride for a new type of user. Utilizing the designing thinking approach and emerging technology such as Google GLASS, student teams will interview drivers and users of specific purpose cars and trucks and then choose a new user to design and build for. Teams will work collectively on different elements of one vehicle to test with their user¿s needs. This project-based course is accessible to students of all backgrounds interested in exploring and transforming the intersection of user-centric design, automotive technology, creative customization and hands-on building.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 294L: Medical Device Design Lab

In collaboration with the School of Medicine. This is the lab portion of ME294, which must be taken concurrently. Introduction to medical device design for undergraduate and graduate engineering students. Design, prototyping and labs. Medical device environments may include hands-on device testing; and field trips to operating rooms and local device companies. Prerequisite: 203.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 297: Forecasting for Innovators:Technology, Tools & Social Change

Technologies from the steam engine to the microprocessor have been mixed gifts, at once benefitting humankind and creating many of the problems facing humanity today. This class will explore how innovators can use forecasting methods to identify new challenges, develop responsive innovations and anticipate unintended consequences. Students will produce a long-range forecast project, applying a variety of methodologies including research, expert interviews and graphical exploration.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 299A: Practical Training

For master's students. Educational opportunities in high technology research and development labs in industry. Students engage in internship work and integrate that work into their academic program. Following internship work, students complete a research report outlining work activity, problems investigated, key results, and follow-up projects they expect to perform. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship/employment and faculty sponsorship. Register under faculty sponsor's section number. All paperwork must be completed by student and faculty sponsor, as the Student Services Office does not sponsor CPT. Students are allowed only two quarters of CPT per degree program. Course may be repeated twice.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Adams, J. (PI) ; Andriacchi, T. (PI) ; Banerjee, B. (PI) ; Barnett, D. (PI) ; Barry, M. (PI) ; Bazant, M. (PI) ; Beach, D. (PI) ; Bowman, C. (PI) ; Bradshaw, P. (PI) ; Burnett, W. (PI) ; Cai, W. (PI) ; Camarillo, D. (PI) ; Cantwell, B. (PI) ; Cappelli, M. (PI) ; Carryer, E. (PI) ; Carter, D. (PI) ; Chang, F. (PI) ; Chaudhuri, O. (PI) ; Cho, K. (PI) ; Cutkosky, M. (PI) ; Darve, E. (PI) ; Dauskardt, R. (PI) ; DeBra, D. (PI) ; Delp, S. (PI) ; Durbin, P. (PI) ; Eaton, J. (PI) ; Edwards, C. (PI) ; Enge, P. (PI) ; Farhat, C. (PI) ; Gao, H. (PI) ; Gerdes, J. (PI) ; Goodson, K. (PI) ; Hanson, R. (PI) ; Harris, J. (PI) ; Harris, J. (PI) ; Homsy, G. (PI) ; Hughes, T. (PI) ; Iaccarino, G. (PI) ; Ihme, M. (PI) ; Ishii, K. (PI) ; Jacobs, C. (PI) ; Jameson, A. (PI) ; Johnston, J. (PI) ; Kasevich, M. (PI) ; Kelley, D. (PI) ; Kelly, M. (PI) ; Kembel, G. (PI) ; Kenny, T. (PI) ; Khatib, O. (PI) ; Kovacs, G. (PI) ; Kruger, C. (PI) ; Kuhl, E. (PI) ; Latombe, J. (PI) ; Leifer, L. (PI) ; Lele, S. (PI) ; Lentink, D. (PI) ; Levenston, M. (PI) ; Lew, A. (PI) ; MacDonald, E. (PI) ; Majumdar, A. (PI) ; Mani, A. (PI) ; Milroy, C. (PI) ; Mitchell, R. (PI) ; Mitiguy, P. (PI) ; Moin, P. (PI) ; Monismith, S. (PI) ; Mungal, M. (PI) ; Nelson, D. (PI) ; Niemeyer, G. (PI) ; Okamura, A. (PI) ; Pianetta, P. (PI) ; Pinsky, P. (PI) ; Pitsch, H. (PI) ; Powell, J. (PI) ; Prinz, F. (PI) ; Pruitt, B. (PI) ; Rock, S. (PI) ; Roth, B. (PI) ; Salisbury, J. (PI) ; Santiago, J. (PI) ; Shaqfeh, E. (PI) ; Sheppard, S. (PI) ; Sherby, O. (PI) ; Springer, G. (PI) ; Steele, C. (PI) ; Street, B. (PI) ; Tang, S. (PI) ; Taylor, C. (PI) ; Toye, G. (PI) ; Tsai, S. (PI) ; Waldron, K. (PI) ; Wang, H. (PI) ; Zajac, F. (PI) ; Zheng, X. (PI)

ME 299B: Practical Training

For Ph.D. students. Educational opportunities in high technology research and development labs in industry. Students engage in internship work and integrate that work into their academic program. Following internship work, students complete a research report outlining work activity, problems investigated, key results, and follow-up projects they expect to perform. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship/employment and faculty sponsorship. Register under faculty sponsor's section number. All paperwork must be completed by student and faculty sponsor, as the student services office does not sponsor CPT. Students are allowed only two quarters of CPT per degree program. Course may be repeated twice.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 300B: Partial Differential Equations in Engineering (CME 204)

Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lele, S. (PI)

ME 301: LaunchPad:Design and Launch your Product or Service

This is an intense course in product design and development offered to graduate students only (no exceptions). In just ten weeks, we will apply principles of design thinking to the real-life challenge of imagining, prototyping, testing and iterating, building, pricing, marketing, distributing and selling your product or service. You will work hard on both sides of your brain. You will experience the joy of success and the (passing) pain of failure along the way. This course is an excellent chance to practice design thinking in a demanding, fast-paced, results-oriented group with support from faculty and industry leaders. This course may change your life. We will treat each team and idea as a real start-up, so the work will be intense. If you do not have a passionate and overwhelming urge to start a business or launch a product or service, this class will not be a fit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 302: The Future of the Automobile

This quarter, the seminar will take a specific focus on "Advanced Driver Assistance Systems", which help drivers to maneuver their vehicles through traffic. Those systems range from navigation systems, adaptive cruise control, night vision, lane departure warning over automated parking, traffic jam assistance, to self-driving cars. With this breadth of applications, advanced driver assistance systems play an important role in making traffic safer, more efficient, and more enjoyable. This course, lectured by an industry expert, will introduce students to technology behind the systems, the benefits, challenges, and future perspectives of this exciting field. At the end of the quarter, students will have developed a technical understanding as well as an understanding for the interactions of the technology, business, and society with a specific automotive focus.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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