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31 - 40 of 64 results for: ME

ME 271E: Aerial Robot Design (AA 248E, ME 171E)

(Graduate students only enroll in ME 271e or AA 248e) A result-focused introduction to the design of winged aerial robots capable of vertical takeoff and landing for a wide range of applications. Students will learn how to ideate specific aerial robot applications and make an appropriate design from scratch that meets mission requirements. Design skill outcomes include: robot need identification based on mission requirements; system ideation and sizing; making design performance tradeoffs; aerodynamic wing design; CAD assembly; communicating the design and its application. The hands-on lab experience includes prototyping the aerial robot mission, to inform system design, by building and flying quadcopters. Prerequisites: intro level undergraduate fluid mechanics or aerodynamics (e.g. ME 70 or AA 100) or equivalent; Intro level undergraduate electronics or Arduino experience; MATLAB experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Lentink, D. (PI)

ME 277: Graduate Design Research Techniques

Students from different backgrounds work on real-world design challenges. The Design Thinking process with emphasis on: ethnographic techniques, needfinding, framing and concept generation. The Design Thinking process as a lens to explore ways to better understand people and their culture. Cultural differences as a source of design inspiration, with the understanding that design itself is a culturally embedded practice.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-4

ME 287: Mechanics of Biological Tissues

Introduction to the mechanical behaviors of biological tissues in health and disease. Overview of experimental approaches to evaluating tissue properties and mathematical constitutive models. Elastic behaviors of hard tissues, nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic models for soft tissues.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

ME 299A: Practical Training

For master's students. Educational opportunities in high technology research and development labs in industry. Students engage in internship work and integrate that work into their academic program. Following internship work, students complete a research report outlining work activity, problems investigated, key results, and follow-up projects they expect to perform. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship/employment and faculty sponsorship. Register under faculty sponsor's section number. All paperwork must be completed by student and faculty sponsor, as the Student Services Office does not sponsor CPT. Students are allowed only two quarters of CPT per degree program. Course may be repeated twice.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ME 299B: Practical Training

For Ph.D. students. Educational opportunities in high technology research and development labs in industry. Students engage in internship work and integrate that work into their academic program. Following internship work, students complete a research report outlining work activity, problems investigated, key results, and follow-up projects they expect to perform. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship/employment and faculty sponsorship. Register under faculty sponsor's section number. All paperwork must be completed by student and faculty sponsor, as the student services office does not sponsor CPT. Students are allowed only two quarters of CPT per degree program. Course may be repeated twice.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ME 300A: Linear Algebra with Application to Engineering Computations (CME 200)

Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ME 304D: Designing Your Life

The course employs a design thinking approach to help fellows develop a point of view about their life and career. The course focuses on an introduction to design thinking, the integration of work and worldview, and practices that support vocation formation. Includes seminar-style discussions, role-playing, short writing assignments, guest speakers, and individual mentoring and coaching. Open to DCI (Distinguished Career Institute) Fellows only. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourlife.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Evans, D. (PI)

ME 306A: Engineering Design Theory in Practice

What is high performance in design? How could you improve your performance as a designer? Theories and frameworks from research into engineering design and design thinking are translated into action for developing insights into your design behavior and to develop strategies to improve design performance. Focus on performance in four aspects of design thinking: design as social activity, cognitive activity, physical activity and learning activity. Practice of effective team behaviors for concept generation, decision-making, and conflict-handling. Cognitive strategies from design as problem-solving, design as reflection-in-action, and C-K Theory. Prototyping performance improvements through media cascade and boundary object frameworks. Application of Perception-Action framework for improving self-learning in design. Students engage in multiple projects and a lab component.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ME 310A: Engineering Design Entrepreneurship and Innovation: exploring the problem space

Reality is the best teacher. The best performers are coached. The best learners are on teams of 3-4 persons. We offer an extraordinary Coaching Team to maximize the value of your time at Stanford. Your year long mission is to create the personal self-efficacy you need to engage wicked real-world design challenges. Your team is one element in a ¿team-of-teams¿ that includes a corporate staff-team and in most cases, a 2nd academic team at an international university. You will be challenged to re-invent-X, to be a start-up in Silicon Valley. Expect 10 different industry funded design challenges at the human interface to Robots, AI, Internet of Things, Autonomous vehicles and Smart Cities. ME310A is dedicated to exploring the problem-space using strategic-foresight, design thinking, team-dynamics-management, rapid prototyping, and human-centric problem RE-framing. We expect you to take ME310ABC.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

ME 313: Human Values and Innovation in Design

Introduction to the philosophy and practice of the Design Impact program. Hands-on design projects are used as vehicles for learning design thinking's tools and methodology. The relationships among technical, human, aesthetic, and business concerns, and drawing, prototyping, and story-telling a will be explored. The focus is on design thinking process and mindsets including: empathy, point of view, ideation, prototyping and testing. For master's students in the Design Impact program only. For a general introduction to design thinking, see ME 377: Design Thinking Studio, taught Autumn and Winter quarters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Burnett, W. (PI)
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