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1 - 10 of 20 results for: DLCL ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

DLCL 11: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, The Ancient World (CLASSICS 37)

This course will journey through ancient literature from Homer to St. Augustine; it will introduce participants to some of its fascinating features and big ideas; and it will reflect on questions such as: What is a good life, a good society? Who is in and who is out and why? What is the meaning of honor, and should it be embraced or feared? Where does human subjectivity fit into a world of matter, cause and effect? When is rebellion justified? What happens when a way of life or thought is upended? Do we have any duties to the past?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

DLCL 50: Humanities House student research workshop

For Humanities House student research workshops.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hicks, L. (PI)

DLCL 98: Independent Study for Modern Languages Minor

Independent study for language students pursuing a Modern Languages minor. Instructor consent required before enrolling in this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

DLCL 121: Performing the Middle Ages

Through an analysis of medieval courtly love, religious, satirical, and Crusade lyrics, we will study the rise of a new subjectivity; the female voice; the roles of poet, audience, and patron; oral and manuscript transmission; and political propaganda. Special attention will be given to performance as a reimagining of self and social identity. Authors include Bertran de Born, Marie de France, Hildegard von Bingen, Walther von der Vogelweide, Dante, and Chaucer. Students will have the opportunity to produce a creative project that brings medieval ideas about performance into dialogue with modern conceptions. Taught in English, all texts in translation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Whobrey, B. (PI)

DLCL 127: Revolutions from Ancient Greece to the Arab Spring (FRENCH 147, HISTORY 214G)

This course looks at theories of revolution and political or social change from ancient Greece to the Arab Spring. The course will provide a close reading of a selection of texts from ancient Greek political writing (Plato, Aristotle), medieval and early modern political advice literature (Marsilius of Padua, Machiavelli), and modern political thought (Tocqueville). Later sections of the course look at how the insights derived from the history of political thought can help generate a new framework for the study of modern revolutions, such as the Iranian Revolution and the Arab Spring. INSTRUCTOR: Vasileios Syros Note: Instructor has submitted WTWD for Social Inquiry (SI) and Ethical Reasoning (ER).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

DLCL 141: Poems, Poetry, Worlds (COMPLIT 121)

What is poetry? How does it speak in many voices to questions of history, society, and personal experience? Why does it matter? The reading and interpretation of poetry in crosscultural comparison as experience, invention, form, sound, knowledge, and part of the world. The readings address poetry of several cultures (Brazil, Chile, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Occitania, Peru) in comparative relation to that of the English-speaking world, and in light of classic and recent theories of poetry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

DLCL 152A: DLCL Film Series: Migration (DLCL 354A)

Join us this quarter for our exploration of the theme "Migration," which will look at the representation of displaced and nomadic bodies in international film. Please be aware that some films may include graphic or disturbing content. Viewers are advised to familiarize themselves with the films' content before viewing. Descriptions of the films can be found at https://dlcl.stanford.edu/content/dlcl-film-series-spring-2017-migration. All screenings are free and open to the public and audience members are encouraged to participate in the discussions following the films. Please also note that grades for this course are entirely dependent on attendance, which is taken at the end of each screening. Enrolled students MUST attend AT LEAST SEVEN screenings in order to obtain credit. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Starkey, K. (PI)

DLCL 189A: Honors Thesis Seminar

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Planning, researching, and writing an honors thesis. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Research and writing methodologies, and larger critical issues in literary studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

DLCL 208: Medieval Sensory Experience (GERMAN 208)

In this seminar we will explore the variety of ways that sensory experience can be communicated through material culture. How did objects shape experience, and how was experience imprinted on objects? To answer these questions, we will move beyond narrative description to trace experiences that were not easily communicated or recreated, and that were ephemeral. We will discuss recent work across disciplines on the emotions, object history, experience, and the senses. All readings will be in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3

DLCL 220: Humanities Education

Humanities Education explores issues concerning teaching and learning in the humanities, including research on student learning, innovation in pedagogy, the role of new technologies in humanities instruction, and professional issues for humanities teachers at all educational levels.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Surwillo, L. (PI)
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