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BIO 12N: Sensory Ecology of Marine Animals

Animals living in the oceans experience a highly varied range of environmental stimuli. An aquatic lifestyle requires an equally rich range of sensory adaptations, including some that are totally foreign to us. In this course we will examine sensory system in marine animals from both an environmental and behavioral perspective and from the point of view of neuroscience and information systems engineering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Thompson, S. (PI)

BIO 13Q: Hacking the Genome

In this course, we will examine the technologies read our genetic makeup - in consumer products as well as in health and medicine - and what we can (and can't) learn about ourselves from that data. We will consider gene editing methods and their applications in health, epidemiology and agriculture, with a spotlight on the CRISPR revolution. This course will include a combination of scientific and popular literature, bioethical debates, and a short laboratory component.
Terms: Spr, offered once only | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sankaran, S. (PI)

BIO 24N: Visions of Paradise: Garden Design

Through literature readings and field trips to local gardens learn the principles and esthetics of classic garden designs: Italian Renaissance, botanical teaching, Japanese, English cottage, and others. Design a personal vision of paradise with details of species, visual and scent impact, water features, and hardscape. Open your eyes to a new appreciation of the world of plants and learn some physiology and genetics that explains the specific properties of individual species.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Walbot, V. (PI)

BIO 25Q: Cystic fibrosis: from medical conundrum to precision medicine success story

Preference to sophomores. The class will explore cystic fibrosis (CF), the most prevalent fatal genetic disease in the US, as a scientific and medical whodunit. Through reading and discussion of medical and scientific literature, we will tackle questions that include: how was life expectancy with CF increased from weeks to decades without understanding the disease mechanism? Why is the disease so prevalent? Is there an advantage to being a carrier? Is CF a single disease or a continuum of physiological variation ¿or- what is a disease? How did research into CF lead to discovery of the underlying cause of most other genetic diseases as well?nnThrough critical reading of the scientific and medical literature, class discussion, field trips and meetings with genetic counselors, caregivers, patients, physicians and researchers, we will work to build a deep understanding of this disease, from the biochemical basis to the current controversies over pathogenic mechanisms, treatment strategies and the ethics and economics of genetic testing and astronomical drug costs.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kopito, R. (PI)

BIO 33N: Conservation Science and Practice

Preference to freshmen. This course will explore the potential for harmonizing people and nature, for achieving improved outcomes in the well-being of both as a result of conservation investments and interventions. We will consider biophysical, economic, social, and psychological perspectives, examining an array of conservation goals, from protecting endangered species to securing ecosystem services (such as flood control and climate stability) to alleviating poverty and improving mental well-being. We will also study the design and implementation of real conservation and human development efforts worldwide, among the many farmers, ranchers, fishing people, and others managing Earth's lands and waters. Highlights include a field trip to Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, Stanford¿s very own nature reserve, and guest visits of some impressive conservation leaders internationally.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 35N: Climate change ecology: Is it too late?

This Introductory Seminar will explore the consequences of climate change on ecological communities, focusing on two emerging concepts: "disequilibrium," which emphasizes that it can take long time for communities to respond to climate change because of species interactions, and "historical contingency," which proposes that the order in which species invade and disappear as communities re-assemble in response to climate change will determine which species will persist. The seminar will involve lecture, discussion, writing, and visit to Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fukami, T. (PI)

BIOE 32Q: Bon App├ętit, Marie Curie! The Science Behind Haute Cuisine

This seminar is for anyone who loves food, cooking or science! We will focus on the science and biology behind the techniques and the taste buds. Not a single lecture will pass by without a delicious opportunity - each weekly meeting will include not only lecture, but also a lab demonstration and a chance to prepare classic dishes that illustrate that day's scientific concepts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Covert, M. (PI)

BIOE 70Q: Medical Device Innovation

BIOE 70Q invites students to apply design thinking to the creation of healthcare technologies. Students will learn about the variety of factors that shape healthcare innovation, and through hands-on design projects, invent their own solutions to clinical needs. Guest instructors will include engineers, doctors, entrepreneurs, and others who have helped bring ideas from concept to clinical use.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 80N: Engineering the Built Environment: An Introduction to Structural Engineering

In this seminar, students will be introduced to the history of modern bridges, buildings and other large-scale structures. Classes will include presentations on transformations in structural design inspired by the development of new materials, increased understanding of hazardous overloads and awareness of environmental impacts. Basic principles of structural engineering and how to calculate material efficiency and structural safety of structural forms will be taught using case studies. The course will include a field trip to a Bay Area large-scale structure, hands-on experience building a tower and computational modeling of bridges, and a paper and presentation on a structure or structural form of interest to the student. The goal of this course is for students to develop an understanding and appreciation of modern structures, influences that have led to new forms, and the impact of structural design on society and the environment. Students from all backgrounds are welcome.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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