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ARCHLGY 75Q: Mad Dogs and Englishmen: Archaeology and the Modern History of the Ancient Near East

The decades between the early-nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries saw substantial change in the region Europeans referred to as the Near East, characterized by the decline of the Ottoman empire, the disarray of World War I, and the establishment of modern national borders. You will learn to analyze, interpret, and critically evaluate archaeological data and the ways in which that data is used to construct an historical narrative. Readings include ancient texts in translation; archaeological field records and reports; travelogues, personal letters and autobiographies; and scholarly articles on the art and archaeology of the Near East.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 100N: The Artist in Ancient Greek Society (CLASSICS 18N)

Given the importance of art to all aspects of their lives, the Greeks had reason to respect their artists. Yet potters, painters and even sculptors possessed little social standing. n nWhy did the Greeks value the work of craftsmen but not the men themselves? Why did Herodotus dismiss those who worked with their hands as "mechanics?" What prompted Homer to claim that "there is no greater glory for a man¿ than what he achieves with his own hands," provided that he was throwing a discus and not a vase on a wheel?n nPainted pottery was essential to the religious and secular lives of the Greeks. Libations to the gods and to the dead required vases from which to pour them. Economic prosperity depended on the export of wine and oil in durable clay containers. At home, depictions of gods and heroes on vases reinforced Greek values and helped parents to educate their children. Ceramic sets with scenes of Dionysian excess were reserved for elite symposia from which those who potted and painted more »
Given the importance of art to all aspects of their lives, the Greeks had reason to respect their artists. Yet potters, painters and even sculptors possessed little social standing. n nWhy did the Greeks value the work of craftsmen but not the men themselves? Why did Herodotus dismiss those who worked with their hands as "mechanics?" What prompted Homer to claim that "there is no greater glory for a man¿ than what he achieves with his own hands," provided that he was throwing a discus and not a vase on a wheel?n nPainted pottery was essential to the religious and secular lives of the Greeks. Libations to the gods and to the dead required vases from which to pour them. Economic prosperity depended on the export of wine and oil in durable clay containers. At home, depictions of gods and heroes on vases reinforced Greek values and helped parents to educate their children. Ceramic sets with scenes of Dionysian excess were reserved for elite symposia from which those who potted and painted them were excluded.n nSculptors were less lowly but even those who carved the Parthenon were still regarded as "mechanics," with soft bodies and soft minds (Xenophon) "indifferent to higher things" (Plutarch).n nThe seminar addresses these issues. Students will read and discuss texts, write response papers and present slide lectures and gallery talks on aspects of the artist's profession.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 224N: The Popular Culture of Abstract Art

This course exposes the pop culture dimensions of major movements in modern abstract art, including Cubism (Braque, Picasso), Dada (Duchamp, Schwitters), Suprematism (Malevich), Purism (Léger, Le Corbusier), Art Deco (Sonia Delaunay), De Stijl (Mondrian), Abstract Expressionism (Pollock). Rather than difficult, austere or elitist, abstraction turns out to be engaging not only on a formal and visual level but also for its interactions with popular music, café culture, newsprint, found objects, automobiles and other modes of transportation, and the idea of spontaneous action.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 246N: Pacific Dreams: Art in California

This course will explore the rich history of art in California from 1850-present. From Chiura Obata¿s exquisite views of Yosemite to ASCO¿s urgent political performances in the streets of Los Angeles, artists have engaged California¿s landscape, history, and diverse populations in myriad ways. Topics of study will include art in San Francisco Chinatown, Hollywood and contemporary art, psychedelia and the counterculture, African American performance and Afrofuturism, and punk rock in Los Angeles. Special attention will be paid to issues of immigration, race, and ethnicity in California. The course will include multiple museum visits and trips to important artistic sites in the Bay Area.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTSINST 11Q: Art in the Metropolis (TAPS 11Q)

This seminar is offered in conjunction with the annual "Arts Immersion" trip to New York that takes place over the spring break and is organized by the Stanford Arts Institute (SAI). Participation in the trip is a requirement for taking part in the seminar (and vice versa). The trip is designed to provide a group of students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in the cultural life of New York City guided by faculty and the SAI programming director. Students will experience a broad range and variety of art forms (visual arts, theater, opera, dance, etc.) and will meet with prominent arts administrators and practitioners, some of whom are Stanford alumni. For further details and updates about the trip, see http://arts.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Phelan, P. (PI)

ASNAMST 31N: Behind the Big Drums: Exploring Taiko (MUSIC 31N)

Preference to Freshman. Since 1992 generations of Stanford students have heard, seen, and felt the power of taiko, big Japanese drums, at Admit Weekend, NSO, or at Baccalaureate. This seminar provides students with the opportunity to get behind the big drums, literally and academically. In fact, taiko is a relative newcomer to the American music scene. The contemporary ensemble drumming form, or kumidaiko, developed in Japan in the 1950s. The first North American taiko groups emerged from the Japanese American community shortly after and coincided with increased Asian American activism. In the intervening years, taiko has spread rapidly into other communities, most surprisingly to the UK, Europe, Australia, and South America. What drives the power of these drums? In this course, we explore the musical, cultural, historical, and political perspectives of taiko through readings and discussion, by playing the drums, workshopping with taiko masters, and meeting members of the taiko community. With North American taiko as the focal point, we learn about Japanese music and Japanese American history, and explore relations between performance, cultural expression, community, and identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 2N: Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease in a Changing World

This seminar will explore the ways in which anthropogenic change, climate change, habitat destruction, land use change, and species invasions effects the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases. Topics will include infectious diseases of humans, wildlife, livestock, and crops, effects of disease on threatened species, disease spillover, emerging diseases, and the role of disease in natural systems. Course will be taught through a combination of popular and scientific readings, discussion, and lecture. .
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mordecai, E. (PI)

BIO 3N: Views of a Changing Sea: Literature & Science

The state of a changing world ocean, particularly in the eastern Pacific, will be examined through historical and contemporary fiction, non-fiction and scientific publications. Issues will include harvest and mariculture fisheries, land-sea interactions and oceanic climate change in both surface and deep waters.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 7N: Introduction to Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 8N: Human Origins

A survey of the anatomical and behavioral evidence for human evolution and of the increasingly important information from molecular genetics. Emphasis on the split between the human and chimpanzee lines 6-7 million years ago, the appearance of the australopiths by 4.1 million years ago, the emergence of the genus Homo about 2.5 million years ago, the spread of Homo from Africa 1.7-1.6 million years ago, the subsequent divergence of Homo into different species on different continents, and the expansion of fully modern humans (Homo sapiens) from Africa about 50,000 years ago to replace the Neanderthals and other non-modern Eurasians.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)
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