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181 - 190 of 283 results for: all courses

ILAC 12Q: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Middle Ages and Renaissance (DLCL 12Q, FRENCH 12Q, HUMCORE 12Q)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? The second quarter focuses on the transition from the Middle Ages to Modernity, Europe's re-acquaintance with classical antiquity and its first contacts with the New World. Authors include Dante, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Cervantes, and Milton. N.B. This is the second of three courses in the European track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study European history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future. Students who take HUMCORE 11 and HUMCORE 12Q will have preferential admission to HUMCORE 13Q (a WR2 seminar).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Galvez, M. (PI)

ILAC 111Q: Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop (DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Students will workshop and revise a translation project throughout the quarter. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translation in the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological and socio-cultural forces that shape translations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 115Q: From Rubber to Cocaine: Commodities in Colombian Literature

Do you like "Narcos" on Netflix and want to learn more about the Drug Wars and its representation? Are you curious about Colombia? The present sophomore seminar serves the double purpose of introducing you to Colombian culture and of training you in sophisticated rhetorical analysis. At the end of the course you will be a better reader and writer (in Spanish, no less!). You will also have familiarity with a country that in some ways is a "meta-Latin American country," for it includes the regional cultures of the Caribbean, Pacific, Andes, plains, and Amazon jungle. We will read fascinating novels that deal with the sugar plantation economy in the 19th century, the exploitation of rubber at the onset of the 20th, and the coffee and cocaine booms leading to the present. Some things to expect: gripping, tragic love stories among the landed elites of the Pacific Coast, and among their slaves, set against the backdrop of a landscape forever transformed by agriculture (La María); dangerous a more »
Do you like "Narcos" on Netflix and want to learn more about the Drug Wars and its representation? Are you curious about Colombia? The present sophomore seminar serves the double purpose of introducing you to Colombian culture and of training you in sophisticated rhetorical analysis. At the end of the course you will be a better reader and writer (in Spanish, no less!). You will also have familiarity with a country that in some ways is a "meta-Latin American country," for it includes the regional cultures of the Caribbean, Pacific, Andes, plains, and Amazon jungle. We will read fascinating novels that deal with the sugar plantation economy in the 19th century, the exploitation of rubber at the onset of the 20th, and the coffee and cocaine booms leading to the present. Some things to expect: gripping, tragic love stories among the landed elites of the Pacific Coast, and among their slaves, set against the backdrop of a landscape forever transformed by agriculture (La María); dangerous adventures of city-dwellers turned jungle explorers (La Vorágine), a strike among banana workers turned supernatural catastrophe (Cien años de soledad); the criminal legacy of Pablo Escobar, a man who built an empire of coca leaf, as a symptom of broader societal problems (La parábola de Pablo). This rare course offering will allow you to gain granular knowledge about a fascinating body of literature. You will also become acquainted with an exciting method of cultural analysis called "new materialism." Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

INTNLREL 60Q: United Nations Peacekeeping

Focus is on an examination of United Nations peacekeeping, from its inception in 1956 in the wake of the Suez Crisis, to its increasingly important role as an enforcer of political stability in sub-Saharan Africa. Examines the practice of "classic" peacekeeping as it developed during the Cold War, the rise and fall of "second-generation" peacekeeping, and the reemergence of a muscular form of peacekeeping in sub-Saharan Africa more recently. Topics include the basic history of the United Nations since 1945, he fundamentals of the United Nations Charter, and the historical trajectory of U.N. peaeckeeping and the evolving arguments of its proponents and critics over the years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

INTNLREL 62Q: Mass Atrocities and Reconciliation

This seminar considers the theory and practice of transitional justice as exemplified by diverse case studies, such as Germany, South Africa, Bosnia, and Rwanda. We will ask ourselves throughout the term whether and to what extent mass atrocities and grave human rights violations can be ameliorated and healed, and what legal, institutional, and political arrangements may be most conducive to such attempts. We will study war crimes tribunals and truth commissions, and we will ask about their effectiveness, especially in regards to their potential of fostering reconciliation in a given society. In every case we will encounter and evaluate specific shortcomings and obstacles, which will provide us with a more nuanced understanding of the complex process of coming to terms with the past.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lutomski, P. (PI)

INTNLREL 63Q: International Organizations and Accountability

International organizations (IOs), like the IMF, the World Bank, the United Nations, and others, have been widely criticized as insufficiently accountable. For example, some argue that states are not able to control IOs whose bureaucracies have grown out of control and run amok, while others argue that the real problem is that communities most impacted by IO activities, such as those receiving World Bank loans or UN peacekeeping operations, are least able to influence their activities. Still others contend that the voting rules by which states control IOs are outdated and should be reformed to remedy these problems.nnThrough readings, discussions and case studies, students will learn about a range of international organizations in order to better understand what they do and how they are supposed to be controlled. In addition, we will evaluate the critiques of IO accountability that come from the right and the left, as well as the North, South, East and West, and will analyze different mechanisms of accountability, both formal and informal. Students will have the opportunity to research and present on specific international organizations and accountability mechanisms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gould, E. (PI)

JAPAN 20Q: Humanities Core: Dao, Virtue, and Nature -- Foundations of East Asian Thought (CHINA 20Q, HUMCORE 20Q, KOREA 20Q)

This course explores the values and questions posed in the formative period of East Asian civilizations. Notions of a Dao ("Way") are common to Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, but those systems of thought have radically different ideas about what that Dao is and how it might be realized in society and an individual's life. These systems of thought appeared first in China, and eventually spread to Korea and Japan. Each culture developed its own ways of reconciling the competing systems, but in each case the comprehensive structure of values and human ideals differs significantly from those that appeared elsewhere in the ancient world. The course examines East Asian ideas about self-cultivation, harmonious society, rulership, and the relation between human and nature with a view toward expanding our understanding of these issues in human history, and highlighting their legacies in Asian civilizations today. The course features selective readings in classics of Confucian, Daoist, and more »
This course explores the values and questions posed in the formative period of East Asian civilizations. Notions of a Dao ("Way") are common to Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, but those systems of thought have radically different ideas about what that Dao is and how it might be realized in society and an individual's life. These systems of thought appeared first in China, and eventually spread to Korea and Japan. Each culture developed its own ways of reconciling the competing systems, but in each case the comprehensive structure of values and human ideals differs significantly from those that appeared elsewhere in the ancient world. The course examines East Asian ideas about self-cultivation, harmonious society, rulership, and the relation between human and nature with a view toward expanding our understanding of these issues in human history, and highlighting their legacies in Asian civilizations today. The course features selective readings in classics of Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist texts that present the foundational tenets of Asian thought. N. B. This is the first of three courses in the Humanities Core, East Asian track. These courses show how history and ideas shape our world and future. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to the life of the mind.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Egan, R. (PI)

JAPAN 21Q: Humanities Core: Love and Betrayal in Asia (CHINA 21Q, HUMCORE 21Q, KOREA 21Q)

Why are lovers in storybooks East and West always star-crossed? Why do love and death seem to go together? For every Romeo and Juliet, there are dozens of doomed lovers in the Asian literary repertoires, from Genji's string of embittered mistresses, to the Butterfly lovers in early modern China, to the voices of desire in Koryo love songs, to the devoted adolescent cousins in Dream of the Red Chamber, to the media stars of Korean romantic drama, now wildly popular throughout Asia. In this course, we explore how the love story has evolved over centuries of East Asian history, asking along the way what we can learn about Chinese, Japanese, and Korean views of family and community, gender and sexuality, truth and deception, trust and betrayal, ritual and emotion, and freedom and solidarity from canonical and non-canonical works in East Asian literatures. N.B. This is the second of three courses in the East Asian track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study East Asian history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Egan, R. (PI)

JAPAN 22Q: Humanities Core: How to be Modern in East Asia (CHINA 22Q, HUMCORE 22Q)

Modern East Asia was almost continuously convulsed by war and revolution in the 19th and 20th centuries. But the everyday experience of modernity was structured more profoundly by the widening gulf between the country and the city, economically, politically, and culturally. This course examines literary and cinematic works from China and Japan that respond to and reflect on the city/country divide, framing it against issues of class, gender, national identity, and ethnicity. It also explores changing ideas about home/hometown, native soil, the folk, roots, migration, enlightenment, civilization, progress, modernization, nationalism, cosmopolitanism, and sustainability. All materials are in English. N.B. This is the third of three courses in the East Asian track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study East Asian history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 82N: Joys and Pains of Growing Up and Older in Japan

What do old and young people share in common? With a focus on Japan, a country with a large long-living population, this seminar spotlights older people's lives as a reflectiion of culture and society, history, and current social and personal changes. Through discussion of multidisciplinary studies on age, analysis of narratives, and films, we will gain a closer understanding of Japanese society and the multiple meanings of growing up and older. Students will also create a short video/audio profile of an older individual, and we will explore cross-cultural comparisons. Held in Knight Bldg. Rm. 201.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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