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21 - 30 of 32 results for: NATIVEAM

NATIVEAM 138: American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective (SOC 138, SOC 238)

(Graduate students register for 238.) Demographic, political, and economic processes and events that shaped relations between Euro-Americans and American Indians, 1600-1890. How the intersection of these processes affected the outcome of conflicts between these two groups, and how this conflict was decisive in determining the social position of American Indians in the late 19th century and the evolution of the doctrine of tribal sovereignty.
Last offered: Winter 2011 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul

NATIVEAM 139: American Indians in Contemporary Society (SOC 139, SOC 239)

(Graduate students register for 239.) The social position of American Indians in contemporary American society, 1890 to the present. The demographic resurgence of American Indians, changes in social and economic status, ethnic identification and political mobilization, and institutions such as tribal governments and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Recommended: 138 or a course in American history.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul

NATIVEAM 143A: American Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore (AMSTUD 143M, ENGLISH 43A, ENGLISH 143A)

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 143A.) Readings from American Indian literatures, old and new. Stories, songs, and rituals from the 19th century, including the Navajo Night Chant. Tricksters and trickster stories; war, healing, and hunting songs; Aztec songs from the 16th century. Readings from modern poets and novelists including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, and Leslie Marmon Silko, and the classic autobiography, "Black Elk Speaks."
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

NATIVEAM 161: Entrepreneurship for Social and Racial Equity (CSRE 161P)

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to business ownership with a focus on owning and operating businesses within diverse communities with an aim to create social impact for future generations as well as profitability and sustainability models. The course will introduce the beginning elements of creating a business (formation, product, business plan) as well as the additional overlay of social impact and cultural considerations. Types of financing as well as effective pitching will also be covered. Course materials will include instructor presentations, case studies, homework assignments, outside hours at campus ¿labs¿, creation of students¿ own business concept plan and guest lectures from successful entrepreneurs working within Silicon Valley and diverse communities. Resources (financing sources, accelerators and incubators), case studies, role models and guest lecturers will be an integral part of this course which can lead to internship opportunities (the latter via application).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

NATIVEAM 163: Endangered Languages and Language Revitalization (ANTHRO 163A, ANTHRO 263A, LINGUIST 163A, LINGUIST 263)

Languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. This course looks at how and why languages die, and what is lost from a culture when that occurs. We will investigate how this trend can be reversed by methods of language documentation and description, the use of innovative technologies, multimodal fieldwork, writing dictionaries and grammars for different audiences, language planning, and data creation, annotation, preservation, and dissemination. We will focus on a number of current programs around the world to revitalize languages. Finally, the course will examine ethical modes of fieldwork within endangered language communities, and the possibilities of successful collaborations and capacity building, focusing especially on Northern California Indian peoples and their languages.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | Repeatable for credit

NATIVEAM 170: Introduction to American Indian Literature (CSRE 170)

This course provides a general introduction to American Indian literatures, beginning with early translations, including oral literatures and autobiographies, and continuing with contemporary poetry and fiction written by American Indian writers. We will want to pay particular attention to the American Indian writers¿ connections to a specific locale or place. In what ways are the stories and poems evocative of a long-standing relationship to a "home landscape"? What is the nature of the relationship? How is that relationship to place similar to or different from our own? At the same time, we will want to pay attention to the nature and scope of the various representations of American Indians in the texts we examine, and ask how the representations reinforce and/or dispel popular and often stereotypical images of American Indian people. Finally, we will want to be aware of and understand our position as readers, particularly as readers who come from and are constituted by historical, social, political, cultural, and ethnic worlds different from or similar to the worlds we find in the books that we are reading.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

NATIVEAM 200R: Directed Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

NATIVEAM 200W: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

NATIVEAM 211: The California Missions: Art History and Reconciliation (ARTHIST 211, CSRE 111)

Sites of the spirit and devotion, sites of genocide, foreboding actors in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, the subject of fourth-grade school projects, the Spanish Missions of Alta California are complex sites of inquiry, their meanings and associations different for each visitor. This seminar examines the art and architecture of the California Missions built between 1769 and 1823. Constructed with local materials and decorated with reredos, paintings and sculptures from Mexico and Spain, the Missions are at once humble spaces and flagships of a belated global baroque. They were also the laboratories of indigenous artists and artisans. This course seeks to understand how Mission art was meant to function, how and why it was made, what its materials were, while asking what the larger role of art was in a global system of missions. Can the study of this art lead to the reconciliation of populations in North America and within the field of art history? The Missions require a specific reexamination of the relationship between European and colonial forms, not as objects of curiosity or diffusion but as viable and globally informed agents.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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