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1 - 10 of 27 results for: NATIVEAM

NATIVEAM 16: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 16, ANTHRO 116C, ARCHLGY 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

NATIVEAM 50Q: Life and Death of Words (CSRE 50Q, ENGLISH 50Q, FEMGEN 50Q, LINGUIST 50Q)

In this course, we explore the world of words: their creation, evolution, borrowing, change, and death. Words are the key to understanding the culture and ideas of a people, and by tracing the biographies of words we are able to discern how the world was, is, and might be perceived and described. We trace how words are formed, and how they change in pronunciation, spelling, meaning, and usage over time. How does a word get into the dictionary? What do words reveal about status, class, region, and race? How is the language of men and women critiqued differently within our society? How does slang evolve? How do languages become endangered or die, and what is lost when they do? We will visit the Facebook Content Strategy Team and learn more about the role words play in shaping our online experiences. Together, the class will collect Stanford language and redesign the digital dictionary of the future. Trigger Warning: Some of the subject matter of this course is sensitive and may cause offense. Please consider this prior to enrolling in the course.
Last offered: Winter 2017

NATIVEAM 64Q: These languages were here first: A look at the indigenous languages of California (ANTHRO 64Q, LINGUIST 64Q)

Stanford was built on land originally inhabited by the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, and Native American students have always held an important place in the university community from the writer and journalist John Milton Oskison (Cherokee) who graduated in 1894 to current enrolments of over three hundred students who represent over fifty tribes. Two hundred years ago, the Muwekma language was one of a hundred languages that made California one of the most linguistically-diverse places on earth. Today, less than half of these languages survive but many California Indian communities are working hard to maintain and revitalize them. This is a familiar pattern globally: languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. Focusing especially on California, this course seeks to find out how and why languages die; what is lost from a culture when that occurs; and how `sleeping¿ languages might be revitalized. We will take a field trip to a Native American community in northern California to witness first-hand how one community is bringing back its traditional language, songs, dances, and story-telling. We will learn from visiting indigenous leaders and linguistic experts who will share their life, language, and culture with the class. Through weekly readings and discussion, we will investigate how languages can be maintained and revitalized by methods of community- and identity-building, language documentation and description, the use of innovative technologies, writing dictionaries and grammars for different audiences, language planning, and data creation, annotation, preservation, and dissemination. Finally, the course will examine ethical modes of fieldwork within endangered-language communities.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

NATIVEAM 103S: Gender in Native American Societies (CSRE 103S, FEMGEN 103S)

Seminar examines the impact of colonialism on gender roles & gender relations in American Indian communities beginning with the 17th century to the present. Topics include demographic changes; social, political & economic transformations associated with biological & spiritual assaults; the dynamism & diversity of native societies. Sources include history, ethnography, biography, autobiography, the novel & film.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED
Instructors: Anderson, J. (PI)

NATIVEAM 108S: American Indian Religious Freedom (CSRE 108S)

The persistence of tribal spiritual beliefs and practices in light of legal challenges (sacred geography and the 1st Amendment), treatment of the dead and sacred objects (repatriation), consumerism (New Age commodification), and cultural intellectual property protection (trademark, copyright, patent law). Focus is on contemporary issues and cases, analyzed through interdisciplinary scholarship and practical strategies to protect the fundamental liberty of American Indian religious freedom.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Biestman, K. (PI)

NATIVEAM 109A: Federal Indian Law (CSRE 109A)

Cases, legislation, comparative justice models, and historical and cultural material. The interlocking relationships of tribal, federal, and state governments. Emphasis is on economic development, religious freedom, and environmental justice issues in Indian country.
Last offered: Winter 2017

NATIVEAM 109B: Indian Country Economic Development (CSRE 109B)

The history of competing tribal and Western economic models, and the legal, political, social, and cultural implications for tribal economic development. Case studies include mineral resource extraction, gaming, and cultural tourism. 21st-century strategies for sustainable economic development and protection of political and cultural sovereignty.
Last offered: Winter 2016

NATIVEAM 111B: Muwekma: Landscape Archaeology and the Narratives of California Natives (ANTHRO 111B, ARCHLGY 111B)

This course explores the unique history of San Francisco Bay Area tribes with particular attention to Muwekma Ohlone- the descendent community associated with the landscape surrounding and including Stanford University. The story of Muwekma provides a window into the history of California Indians from prehistory to Spanish exploration and colonization, the role of Missionaries and the controversial legacy of Junipero Serra, Indigenous rebellions throughout California, citizenship and land title during the 19th century, the historical role of anthropology and archaeology in shaping policy and recognition of Muwekma, and the fight for acknowledgement of Muwekma as a federally recognized tribe. We will visit local sites associated with this history and participate in field surveys of the landscape of Muwekma.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

NATIVEAM 115: Introduction to Native American History

This course incorporates a Native American perspective in the assigned readings and is an introduction to Native American History from contact with Europeans to the present. History, from a Western perspective, is secular and objectively evaluative whereas for most Indigenous peoples, history is a moral endeavor (Walker, Lakota Society 113). A focus in the course is the civil rights era in American history when Native American protest movements were active. Colonization and decolonization, as they historically occurred are an emphasis throughout the course using texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century in addition to the main text. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and one longer paper that is summarized in a 15-20 minute presentation on a topic of interest relating to the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

NATIVEAM 117S: History of California Indians (CSRE 117S, HISTORY 250A)

Demographic, political, and economic history of California Indians, 1700s-1950s. Processes and events leading to the destruction of California tribes, and their effects on the groups who survived. Geographic and cultural diversity. Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo-American periods. The mission system.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED
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