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11 - 20 of 33 results for: CHPR ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CHPR 226: Promoting Health Over the Life Course: the Science of Healthy Living (HUMBIO 126)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HumBio 126. CHPR students must enroll in CHPR 226 for a letter grade.) Disease prevention and health promotion topics pertinent at different stages of the life span emphasizing healthy lifestyle and reducing risk factors in both individuals and communities. Focus is on the application of behavioral science to risk reduction strategies, and the importance of health promotion as a social and economic imperative. Public and community health are emphasized. Topics include: epidemiology of chronic diseases; social determinants of health, behavior change; physical activity, nutrition, obesity and stress reduction; children, young adult, mid-life and aging health issues; health care delivery and public health system; workplace wellness; and other additional issues. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor. Students enrolled in CHPR 226 must complete additional assignments appropriate for its Masters level listing. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CHPR 227: The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research (HRP 272)

The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research course will focus on how the science of community engagement can be applied to diverse health-related research topics across the translational spectrum with the ultimate goal of high quality research that transforms human health and addresses health disparities. The course will provide historical context, theoretical frameworks, foundational skills in diverse community engagement methodologies, and tools for examining the effectiveness of various engagement strategies aimed. Specifically, the course will cover: 1) Historical context for community engagement in health-related research; 2) Evolution of community engagement as a science; 3) Theoretical frameworks for various community engagement approaches; 4) Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR); 5) Community engagement strategies for different stages of translational research; and 6) Evaluation of various engagement strategies; and 7) Ethics of community engagement. Student more »
The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research course will focus on how the science of community engagement can be applied to diverse health-related research topics across the translational spectrum with the ultimate goal of high quality research that transforms human health and addresses health disparities. The course will provide historical context, theoretical frameworks, foundational skills in diverse community engagement methodologies, and tools for examining the effectiveness of various engagement strategies aimed. Specifically, the course will cover: 1) Historical context for community engagement in health-related research; 2) Evolution of community engagement as a science; 3) Theoretical frameworks for various community engagement approaches; 4) Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR); 5) Community engagement strategies for different stages of translational research; and 6) Evaluation of various engagement strategies; and 7) Ethics of community engagement. Students will gain practical experience in various community engagement tools and strategies to help guide the development of a community engagement plan responsive to community needs. Challenges and benefits of establishing community partnerships will be highlighted by real-world examples. nThe course will include lectures; interactive student-led presentations and guided exercises; class discussions among invited speakers, students and instructors; individual and group assignments; and organized small-group and experiential activities. Course readings will demonstrate the need and opportunity for interdisciplinary community engagement approaches and will illustrate how to conduct innovative community-engaged research. nThe Science of Community Engagement course is intended to reach students with diverse research interests, including clinical research, community health, health research and policy, epidemiology, prevention research, environmental health, etc.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Rosas, L. (PI)

CHPR 228: Theoretical Foundations and Design of Behavioral Intervention Trials

Focuses on the knowledge and skills, respect and thoughtful practice of designing health promotion interventions that are relevant, theoretically-informed, have broad impacts, and can endure. Provides an in-depth review of intervention approaches for health promotion and disease prevention and covers the leading theories of behavior change. Follows an integrative model to demonstrate similarities and differences between the theoretical approaches, seeking what is useful and worthwhile in each theoretical model rather than looking primarily for what is most easily criticized. Practical in nature with emphasis on the specifics of needs assessments and intervention development and delivery and how these may vary across community settings, with diverse populations, addressing different behaviors, and leveraging traditional and emerging delivery channels. Explores intervention creation, delivery, effectiveness, and sustainability to identify and better understand the resources and other pra more »
Focuses on the knowledge and skills, respect and thoughtful practice of designing health promotion interventions that are relevant, theoretically-informed, have broad impacts, and can endure. Provides an in-depth review of intervention approaches for health promotion and disease prevention and covers the leading theories of behavior change. Follows an integrative model to demonstrate similarities and differences between the theoretical approaches, seeking what is useful and worthwhile in each theoretical model rather than looking primarily for what is most easily criticized. Practical in nature with emphasis on the specifics of needs assessments and intervention development and delivery and how these may vary across community settings, with diverse populations, addressing different behaviors, and leveraging traditional and emerging delivery channels. Explores intervention creation, delivery, effectiveness, and sustainability to identify and better understand the resources and other practical considerations necessary to produce, deliver, monitor, and disseminate an intervention with demonstrated effectiveness. Examples drawn from across the behavioral spectrum and include tobacco control, physical activity, healthy diet, stress and distress, as well as consideration of the complexities of extending interventions to target multiple risk behaviors. Students develop a foundational understanding of behavior change theory, rigorous research methods, and creative design strategies to advance the health of individuals and communities. Students taking 2 units only will complete all 4 homework assignments, attend 8 of 10 class sessions, and complete an abbreviated final abstract plus figures/tables instead of a final paper. The grading, in this instance, will be the medical school option of credit/no credit. CHPR master's students must enroll for 3 units and a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3

CHPR 230: Sexual Function and Diversity in Medical Disciplines (FEMGEN 230, FEMGEN 230X, SOMGEN 230)

This course is a coordinated seminar series that presents evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention guidelines by clinical and translational research and population health science faculty of clinical departments other than Medicine (the focus of CHPR 260) of the Stanford School of Medicine, including; Anesthesiology & Perioperative, & Pain Medicine, Cardiothoracic gy, Emergency Medicine, Neurology & Neurological Sciences, Neurosurgery, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Ophthalmology, Orthopaedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Radiation Oncology, Radiology, Surgery and Urology. CHPR master's program students must enroll in CHPR 230 for a letter grade and priority for enrollment will be given to current CHPR students. For third unit, graduate students attend INDE 215 Queer Health & Medicine and complete assignments for that section. For third unit and WAYs, undergrads enroll in SOMGEN 130. Prerequisites: CHPR 201 or HUMBIO 126/ CHPR 226 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

CHPR 240: Prevention Research: the Science of Healthy Living

Features the research of faculty in the Stanford Prevention Research Center and focuses on key health issues over the life course (prenatal through childhood, young to middle-aged, older and elderly adults). Topics include chronic disease (global and U.S.) epidemiology; application of behavioral science to risk reduction; nutrition; weight management; physical activity; stopping smoking; public health; community health and community-based prevention; national prevention strategy; applying communication technology to health promotion. Prerequisite: HumBio 126 or concurrent enrollment in CHPR 201.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CHPR 247: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (MED 147, MED 247)

Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Kiernan, M. (PI)

CHPR 250: Prevention Across Medical Disciplines: Evidence-based Guidelines

Coordinated seminar series presenting evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention guidelines by research and clinical faculty of multiple divisions of Stanford's Department of Medicine, including cardiovascular medicine, oncology, nephrology, immunology and rheumatology, infectious diseases, endocrinology, gerontology and metabolism, gastroenterology and hepatology, hematology, blood and marrow transplantation, pulmonary and critical care medicine, general medical disciplines (including family medicine). Key prevention issues addressed in primary care and outcomes research, biomedical informatics research and the Stanford Prevention Research Center also presented. Enrollment priority given to CHPR Master's students. CHPR students must enroll for letter grade.Prerequisite: CHPR 201 or HUMBIO 126/ CHPR 226 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CHPR 266: Advanced Statistical Methods for Observational Studies (EDUC 260B, HRP 292, STATS 266)

Design principles and statistical methods for observational studies. Topics include: matching methods, sensitivity analysis, and instrumental variables. 3 unit registration requires a small project and presentation. Computing is in R. Pre-requisites: HRP 261 and 262 or STATS 209 ( HRP 239), or equivalent. See http://rogosateaching.com/somgen290/
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3

CHPR 270: Prevention Across Surgical and Other Medical Disciplines

This course is coordinated seminar series that presents evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention guidelines by clinical and translational research and population health science faculty of clinical departments other than Medicine (the focus of CHPR 260) of the Stanford School of Medicine, including; Anesthesiology & Perioperative, & Pain Medicine, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Dermatology, Emergency Medicine, Neurology & Neurological Sciences, Neurosurgery, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Ophthalmology, Orthopaedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Radiation Oncology, Radiology, Surgery and Urology, CHPR master's program students must enroll for a letter grade and priority for enrollment will be given to current CHPR students. Prerequisites: CHPR 201 or HUMBIO 126/ CHPR 226 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CHPR 271: Human Molecular Genetics (GENE 271)

For genetic counseling students, graduate students in genetics, medical students, residents, and postdoctoral fellows interested in the practice of medical genetics and genomics. Gene structure and function; the impact of mutation and polymorphism as they relate to developmental pathways and human disease; mitochondrial genetics; approaches to the study of complex genetic conditions; GWAS and genome sequencing technologies; variant interpretation; gene therapy, stem cell biology, and pharmacogenetics. Undergraduates require consent of instructor and a basic genetics course. Non-GC students: Please contact the instructor when you enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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