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81 - 90 of 136 results for: ARTSTUDI

ARTSTUDI 231A: Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino (ARTSTUDI 130)

Students use electronics and software to create kinetic and interactive elements in artwork. No prior knowledge of electronics or software is required. Students learn to program the Arduino, a small easy-to-use microprocessor control unit ( see http://www.arduino.cc/ ). Learn to connect various sensors such as light, motion, sound and touch and use them to control software. Learn to interface actuators like motors, lights and solenoids to create movement. Learn to connect the Arduino to theMAX/MSP/Jitter programming environment to create media-intensive video and audio environments. Explore the social dimensions of electronic art. (lower level)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 233: Let's Make a Monster: Critical Making (FILMSTUD 233, FILMSTUD 433)

Ever since Frankenstein unleashed his monster onto the world in Mary Shelley¿s novel from 1818, the notion of ¿technology-out-of-control¿ has been a constant worry of modern societies, plaguing more optimistic visions of progress and innovation with fears that modern machines harbor potentials that, once set in motion, can no longer be tamed by their human makers. In this characteristically modern myth, the act of making ¿ and especially technological making ¿ gives rise to monsters. As a cautionary tale, we are therefore entreated to look before we leap, to go slow and think critically about the possible consequences of invention before we attempt to make something radically new. However, this means of approaching the issue of human-technological relations implies a fundamental opposition between thinking and making, suggesting a split between cognition as the specifically human capacity for reflection versus a causal determinism-without-reflection that characterizes the machinic or t more »
Ever since Frankenstein unleashed his monster onto the world in Mary Shelley¿s novel from 1818, the notion of ¿technology-out-of-control¿ has been a constant worry of modern societies, plaguing more optimistic visions of progress and innovation with fears that modern machines harbor potentials that, once set in motion, can no longer be tamed by their human makers. In this characteristically modern myth, the act of making ¿ and especially technological making ¿ gives rise to monsters. As a cautionary tale, we are therefore entreated to look before we leap, to go slow and think critically about the possible consequences of invention before we attempt to make something radically new. However, this means of approaching the issue of human-technological relations implies a fundamental opposition between thinking and making, suggesting a split between cognition as the specifically human capacity for reflection versus a causal determinism-without-reflection that characterizes the machinic or the technical. Nevertheless, recent media theory questions this dichotomy by asserting that technologies are inseparable from humans¿ abilities to think and to act in the world, while artistic practices undo the thinking/making split more directly and materially, by taking materials ¿ including technologies ¿ as the very medium of their critical engagement with the world. Drawing on impulses from both media theory and art practice, ¿critical making¿ names a counterpart to ¿critical thinking¿ ¿ one that utilizes technologies to think about humans¿ constitutive entanglements with technology, while recognizing that insight often comes from errors, glitches, malfunctions, or even monsters. Co-taught by a practicing artist and a media theorist, this course will engage students in hands-on critical practices involving both theories and technologies. Let¿s make a monster!
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTSTUDI 236: Future Media, Media Archaeologies (MUSIC 236)

Hand-on. Media technologies from origins to the recent past. Students create artworks based on Victorian era discoveries and inventions, early developments in electronic media, and orphaned technologies. Research, rediscover, invent, and create devices of wonder and impossible objects. Readings in history and theory. How and what media technologies mediate.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 239: Intermedia Workshop (MUSIC 155, MUSIC 255)

Students develop and produce intermedia works. Musical and visual approaches to the conceptualisation and shaping of time-based art. Exploration of sound and image relationship. Study of a wide spectrum of audiovisual practices including experimental animation, video art, dance, performance, non-narrative forms, interactive art and installation art. Focus on works that use music/sound and image as equal partners. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: consent of instructors, and one of FILMPROD 114, ARTSTUDI 131, 138, 167, 177, 179, or MUSIC 123, or equivalent. May be repeated for credit
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 240: Drawing II

Intermediate/advanced. Observation, invention, and construction. Development of conceptual and material strategies, with attention to process and purpose. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 140 or consent of instructor. (upper level)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 243: Anatomy for Artists (SURG 243)

Lectures highlight the intersections and influences between human anatomy and art. Studio sessions provide an opportunity for students to immerse in anatomically inspired studio projects. Drawing, mixed media, and some painting mediums will be used during the studio sessions. Plastic models, dry bones, cadaveric specimens, and live models will be used for the studio sessions. Class time includes art instruction, creation and feedback. May be repeated for credit. Honing individual style is encouraged; both beginning and advanced students are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ARTSTUDI 244: Advance Figure Drawing

Figurative depiction is explored across a wide range of media and techniques. Throughout the quarter, artist and figure are explored as subject/object, metaphor, player, and director. Beginning with traditional approaches across various media (graphite and charcoal, ink/brush, soft and oil pastels, mixed media), we move into various methods of distortion. Using both live models and our own bodies, performance and depictive strategies are employed to create work which examines identity and power relationships. In the final two weeks, we have two live models working together. Work will excise/reassemble found and staged images, juxtaposing figures, creating tension and implied narratives in space. Four outside projects push skills and concept, amplifying each artist¿s hand and voice.nnPrerequisite: Drawing 1 or instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Deas, Y. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 245: Painting II

Symbolic, narrative, and representational self-portraits. Introduction to the pictorial strategies, painting methods, and psychological imperatives of Dürer, Rembrandt, Cézanne, Kahlo, Beckmann, Schiele, and Munch. Students paint from life, memory, reproductions, and objects of personal significance to create a world in which they describe themselves. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: 140, 145, or consent of instructor. (upper level)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chagoya, E. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 246: Individual Work: Drawing and Painting

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory studio course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. $100 Lab Fee. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 247: Collage

Collage has influenced painting and drawing practices, as well as film and photography through juxtaposition, scale shifts, and reappropriation of the found image. Although many iconic works in this medium date to the 20th century, this course focuses on collage as a vibrant, contemporary form. nnLectures on artists using collage with new vigor. Studio component focused on experimentation and exploration. Student work is encouraged to speak to personal, aesthetic, or political concerns, using findings from magazines, advertisements, internet, and other sources. Working with Photoshop, scans and with print, we will use collage elements to create new and stunning compositions of contemporary life.nnPrerequisites: 140, 145, or consent of instructor. (upper level). May be repeated for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Howe, S. (PI)
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