2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

41 - 50 of 145 results for: ARTSTUDI

ARTSTUDI 148: Monotype

Introduction to printmaking using monotype, a graphic art medium used by such artists as Blake, Degas, Gauguin, and Pendergast. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 140. (lower level). May be repeated 2 times for total of 8 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Kain, K. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 148A: Lithography

The classic technique of printing from limestones. Techniques to draw an image on the stone, etch and fix the image on the stone, and print it in numbered editions. Students work on a variety of stone sizes. Field trips to local publishers of lithography or lithography exhibitions. (lower level)
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 148B: Introduction to Printmaking

Techniques such as monotype, monoprint, photocopy transfers, linocut and woodcut, intaglio etching. Demonstrations of these techniques. Field trips to local print collections or print exhibitions. (lower level)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Wilson, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 148C: Introduction to Lithography

The classic technique of printing from limestones. Techniques include drawing with litho crayons, tusche washes, and color blends. Students will learn to etch and fix an image onto a stone. They will also print in numbered editions and in a variety of stone sizes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ARTSTUDI 148P: The Hybrid Print

This class explores experimental printmaking methods where digital and traditional practices collide. It focuses on the interchange between conventional and new methods of printmaking, and possibilities for the print beyond paper and the flat picture plane in contemporary art. Techniques will be demonstrated in class, and students will pursue projects using these techniques, developing their own conceptual interests. We will explore digital processes using large format printers, as well as digitally augmented traditional printmaking methods such as monoprints, collographs, woodblock and linocut, aided by dye sublimation, vinyl cutting, and 3-d printing. Students will have access to a wide array of both digital and traditional tools, and will develop projects using a combination of methods, resulting in a body of work. Discussions will address the expansive nature of contemporary fine art printmaking.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Wilson, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 149: Fiber and Wearable Art

In this project-based studio course, students will investigate how wearable art is situated in the conversations around contemporary art. Particular attention will be directed to how artists confront ideas around the body, gender identity, performance, and experimental costumes. Final projects will be contextualized through final photo or video documentation. Students will examine the way materiality and craft can inform concept and will have the opportunity to use a variety of machinery to think about their projects. No sewing experience necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Towfiq, S. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 149C: Etching

In this class students will explore various techniques of etching (or intaglio) on zinc plates such as, hard ground, soft ground, aquatint, marbling aquatint and sugar lift, through an electrolytic process that uses no acid but sulfates and very low electrical power (1.5 V or the same as a AA battery). This process is much less toxic that the traditional etching with nitric (which produces toxic fumes) or ferric acid (difficult to clean). These techniques will be complemented by other ones that can be mixed with etching such as photocopy transfers, Chine collé (attaching a different color paper between plate and main paper), and mono-printing. nnEtching/Intaglio (making a mark under the surface of the plate) is one of the most tactile and elegant forms of printmaking. The plate leaves a 3-D line mark and embossed marks in the deep etched areas as well as at the edges of the plate. Many major artists have left memorable images by working in this medium (Rembrandt, Goya, Kathe Kollwitz, Eduard Munch, and many others) influencing many contemporary artists.
Last offered: Winter 2015

ARTSTUDI 150: Sculpture: Votives, Totems and Sanctuaries

The focus of this course is to discover how meaning is inscribed into the objects and places we make. Using three forms both ancient and contemporary¿ the votive, the totem and the sanctuary¿we will consider a variety of cultural precedents made with spiritual and/or religious intensions. Students will research the origins and philosophies of chosen examples, glean formal terms, such as size, scale, composition, color and materiality and create new works with both personal and cultural meanings.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ARTSTUDI 150Q: Queer Sculpture

Outlaw sensibilities, self-made kinships, chosen lineages, utopic futurity, exilic commitment, and rage at institutions that police the borders of the normal these are among the attitudes that make up queer in its contemporary usage. David J. GetsynnThis hands on studio based course explores queer as a form of art production. Artists and thinkers use queer to signal defiance to the mainstream and an embrace of difference, uniqueness and self-determination. To be intolerable is to demand that the normal, the natural and the common be challenged. To do this is not to demand inclusion, but rather to refuse to accept any operations of exclusion and erasure that make up the normal and posit compulsory sameness. Queer Sculpture is also about the strategic effort to appropriate and subvert conventional art practices and tactics that may involve everything from shifts in the content of a work and its targeted audience to the methods by which it is produced and its formal properties. The politi more »
Outlaw sensibilities, self-made kinships, chosen lineages, utopic futurity, exilic commitment, and rage at institutions that police the borders of the normal these are among the attitudes that make up queer in its contemporary usage. David J. GetsynnThis hands on studio based course explores queer as a form of art production. Artists and thinkers use queer to signal defiance to the mainstream and an embrace of difference, uniqueness and self-determination. To be intolerable is to demand that the normal, the natural and the common be challenged. To do this is not to demand inclusion, but rather to refuse to accept any operations of exclusion and erasure that make up the normal and posit compulsory sameness. Queer Sculpture is also about the strategic effort to appropriate and subvert conventional art practices and tactics that may involve everything from shifts in the content of a work and its targeted audience to the methods by which it is produced and its formal properties. The political imperatives of a queer or queered position will shape thematic investigations of practices related to utopic futurity, anti-assimilationist practices, failure, abstraction, the archive, camp, drag and alternative families. Classes will require reading, discussing, and making. Students will produce artwork for critiques and participate in discussions of the readings. The course includes guest artists and fieldtrips to local LGBTQ archives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED
Instructors: Berlier, T. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 151: Sculpture I

Traditional and non-traditional approaches to sculpture production through working with materials including wood, metal, and plaster. Conceptual and technical skills, and safe and appropriate use of tools and materials. Impact of material and technique upon form and content; the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Historical and contemporary forming methods provide a theoretical basis for studio work. Field trips; guest lecturers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints