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1 - 10 of 41 results for: urbanst

URBANST 20: Exploring Urbanism in San Francisco: Three Urban Adventures to Better Understand Cities

What makes San Francisco distinctive as a city? How have designers, architects, builders and planners shaped the city, and how does their work affect San Francisco and its people? This Urban Studies pop-up class will introduce students to the unique architecture and urbanism of San Francisco. A series of three guided walking tours will provide an insider's perspective on the City's most interesting neighborhoods and will also explore core themes and topics in the field of urban design. An informal 90 minute on-campus discussion and slideshow of student-generated imagery (on the Thursday evening following each tour) will allow for an expanded conversation about the urban environment. This course is intended for freshmen and sophomores.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 27Q: The Detective and the City

This seminar will analyze the social reality of three historic cities (London in the 1880s and 90s, San Francisco in the 1920s and 30s, and contemporary Shanghai) through the prism of popular crime fiction featuring three great literary detectives (Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade, and Qiu Xiaolong's Chief Inspector Chen). As a student in this course, you will explore why crime fiction is so popular, why the fear of crime is so much a part of modern urban culture, and why the police detective and the private investigator have become iconic code heroes of pulp fiction, movies, TV shows, and even video games. If you take this class, you will have the opportunity to write a paper and present your research on one of the classic literary detectives or on one of today's related manifestations of the same impulse in mass-market tales of superheroes, vampires, and the zombie apocalypse.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Stout, F. (PI)

URBANST 101: Public Service Internship Preparation (ARTSINST 40, EARTHSYS 9, EDUC 9, HUMBIO 9, PUBLPOL 74)

Are you prepared for your internship this summer? This workshop series will help you make the most of your internship experience by setting learning goals in advance; negotiating and communicating clear roles and expectations; preparing for a professional role in a non-profit, government, or community setting; and reflecting with successful interns and community partners on how to prepare sufficiently ahead of time. You will read, discuss, and hear from guest speakers, as well as develop a learning plan specific to your summer or academic year internship placement. This course is primarily designed for students who have already identified an internship for summer or a later quarter. You are welcome to attend any and all workshops, but must attend the entire series and do the assignments for 1 unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

URBANST 103C: Housing Visions (CEE 33C)

This course provides an introduction to American Housing practices, spanning from the Industrial Age to the present. Students will examine a range of projects that have aspired to a range of social, economic and/or environmental visions. While learning about housing typologies, students will also evaluate the ethical role that housing plays within society. The course focuses on the tactical potentials of housing, whether it is to provide a strong community, solve crisis situations, integrate social services, or encourage socio-economic mixture. Students will learn housing design principles and organizational strategies, and the impact of design on the urban environment. They will discuss themes of shared spaces and defensible spaces; and how design can accommodate the evolving demographics and culture of this country. For example, how can housing design address the changing relationship between living and working? What is the role of housing and ownership in economic mobility? These issues will be discussed within the context the changing composition of the American population and economy. n nThis course will be primarily discussion-based, using slideshows, readings and field trips as a departure points for student-generated conversations. Each student will be asked to lead a class discussion based on his/her research topic. Students will evaluate projects, identifying which aspects of the initial housing visions were realized, which did not, and why. Eventually, students might identify factors that lead to ¿successful¿ projects, and/or formulate new approaches that can strengthen or redefine the progressive role of housing: one inclusive of the complex social, economic, and ethical dimensions of design.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Choe, B. (PI)

URBANST 107: Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning

An investigation into urban planning as a democratic practice for facilitating or mitigating change in society and the built environment. We will engage in professional planning practices in focused sessions on transportation, design, housing, environmental policy, demographic research, community organizing and real estate development. Strong emphasis on developing an understanding of the forces that shape urban and regional development, including cultural trends, real estate and labor economics, climate change and the environment, and political organizing and power dynamics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Raya, M. (PI)

URBANST 109: Physics of Cities (CEE 6)

An introduction to the modern study of complex systems with cities as an organizing focus. Topics will include: cities as interacting systems; cities as networks; flows of resources and information through cities; principles of organization, self-organization, and complexity; how the properties of cities scale with size; and human movement patterns. No particular scientific background is required, but comfort with basic mathematics will be assumed. Prerequisites: MATH 19 and 20, or the equivalent
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

URBANST 110: Introduction to Urban Studies (HISTORY 107)

Today, for the first time in history, a majority of people live in cities. By 2050, cities will hold two-thirds of the world¿s population. This transformation touches everyone, and raises critical questions. What draws people to live in cities? How will urban growth affect the world¿s environment? Why are cities so divided by race and by class, and what can be done about it? How do cities change who we are, and how can we change cities? In this class, you will learn to see cities in new ways, from the smallest everyday interactions on a city sidewalk to the largest patterns of global migration and trade. We will use specific examples from cities around the world to illustrate the concepts that we learn in class. The course is intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

URBANST 111: Political Power in American Cities (AMSTUD 121Z, POLISCI 121, PUBLPOL 133)

The major actors, institutions, processes, and policies of sub-state government in the U.S., emphasizing city general-purpose governments through a comparative examination of historical and contemporary politics. Issues related to federalism, representation, voting, race, poverty, housing, and finances. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 121.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

URBANST 113: Introduction to Urban Design: Contemporary Urban Design in Theory and Practice

Comparative studies in neighborhood conservation, inner city regeneration, and growth policies for metropolitan regions. Lect-disc and research focusing on case studies from North America and abroad, team urban design projects. Two Saturday class workshops in San Francisco: 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the quarter. Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-SI
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 114: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (ANTHRO 126)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. We will study urban space both historically and cross-culturally. Urban Studies, by definition, is an interdisciplinary field, where the methodological approaches draw upon a diverse set of analytic tools. Disciplines that occupy a prominent place in this class are geography, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, media studies, and literature. In this context, we will discuss the importance of cities around the world to the economic, cultural, and political well-being of modern societies and examine how forces such as industrialization, decentralization, and globalization affect the structure and function of cities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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