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1 - 10 of 40 results for: urbanst

URBANST 27Q: Sophomore Seminar: Three Detectives, Three Cities

This seminar will analyze the social reality of three historic cities (London in the 1880s and 90s, San Francisco in the 1920s and 30s, and contemporary Shanghai) through the prism of popular crime fiction featuring three great literary detectives (Arthur Conan Doyle¿s Sherlock Holmes, Dashiell Hammett¿s Sam Spade, and Qiu Xiaolong¿s Chief Inspector Chen). As a student in this course, you will explore why crime fiction is so popular, why the fear of crime is so much a part of modern urban culture, and why the police detective and the private investigator have become iconic code heroes of pulp fiction, movies, TV shows, and even video games. If you take this class, you will have the opportunity to write a paper and present your research on one of the classic literary detectives or on one of today¿s related manifestations of the same impulse in mass-market tales of superheroes, vampires, and the zombie apocalypse.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Stout, F. (PI)

URBANST 100A: Housing as a Human Right: Exploring Housing Justice from the Global to the Particular

Is it useful to conceptualize housing through a human rights lens? Are there ethical tools that we can use to think about housing that can work on a variety of different scales? This one-unit course aims to explore ideas about human rights as they intersect with ideas about housing. We will begin the class by examining philosophical ideas of what exactly are human rights and then move through different scales of context to discuss what housing as a human right can mean on international, national, regional, and particular levels. During the trip at the end of the quarter, students will be provided opportunities to apply the metrics and methods of thought used during the quarter to think about housing justice and ideas about housing as a human right in the Bay Area.nnnTo be admitted to the course, students must apply by 11:59 pm on Friday, November 4 through the ASB website, www.tinyurl.com/stanfordasb2017nnnLimited to students participating in the Alternative Spring Break program. See http://asb.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)

URBANST 101: Public Service Internship Preparation (ARTSINST 40, EARTHSYS 9, EDUC 9, HUMBIO 9, PUBLPOL 74)

Are you prepared for your internship this summer? This workshop series will help you make the most of your internship experience by setting learning goals in advance; negotiating and communicating clear roles and expectations; preparing for a professional role in a non-profit, government, or community setting; and reflecting with successful interns and community partners on how to prepare sufficiently ahead of time. You will read, discuss, and hear from guest speakers, as well as develop a learning plan specific to your summer or academic year internship placement. This course is primarily designed for students who have already identified an internship for summer or a later quarter. You are welcome to attend any and all workshops, but must attend the entire series and do the assignments for 1 unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

URBANST 104: Civic Dreams, Human Spaces: Urban Design with People

Intensive two-week studio explores the principles underlying vibrant public spaces. Use observation and prototyping tools to inform the process of urban development. Decode public spaces from multiple perspectives: as sites of recreation, interaction, and political contention; as physical infrastructure that municipalities or grassroots citizen groups build and maintain for the common good; and as places with intangible qualities, such as historical memory, identity, and personal stories. In addition to on-campus meetings, this course requires immersive fieldwork in the City of San Francisco, including two weekend overnight stays and the opportunity to re-imagine the design and use of public spaces with local partners. Enrollment by application only. Find more info and apply at dschool.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4

URBANST 105: The Hipster and the City: Race, Ethnicity, Hip-Hop, and Gentrification in Oakland

This course introduce undergraduate students to the theory and methods of thengeospatial history (and humanities), understood broadly as the application of GISntechniques and other quantitative methods in the humanistic study of social and culturalnpatterns in past and recent settings.n! Specifically, the movement of Black population from small towns and plantationsnpre-civil war to the Urban Cities (after the Civil War) to the metropolis (The GreatnMigration) to the present day Black Lives Matter) as been studied by historians usingntraditional methodology. However, these disciplines are becoming outmoded, becausena technology has taken its place.n! Using social media and Arc GIS software (Omega and Neatline),and other spatialntheory and learning technical methodologies, Google Street view, and Taggingncollectives to recover and retrace social movements from Greensboro Sit in, to thenBerkeley Student uprisings of the late 1960s to the Hashtag revolution of Black LivesnMatter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Brown, C. (PI)

URBANST 107: Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning

An investigation into urban planning as a democratic practice for facilitating or mitigating change in society and the built environment. We will engage in professional planning practices in focused sessions on transportation, design, housing, environmental policy, demographic research, community organizing and real estate development. Strong emphasis on developing an understanding of the forces that shape urban and regional development, including cultural trends, real estate and labor economics, climate change and the environment, and political organizing and power dynamics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Raya, M. (PI)

URBANST 108: Grassroots Community Organizing: Building Power for Collective Liberation (AFRICAAM 100, CSRE 100, FEMGEN 100X)

Taught by long-time community organizer, Beatriz Herrera. This course explores the theory, practice and history of grassroots community organizing as a method for developing community power to promoting social justice. We will develop skills for 1-on-1 relational meetings, media messaging, fundraising strategies, power structure analysis, and strategies organizing across racial/ethnic difference. And we will contextualize these through the theories and practices developed in the racial, gender, queer, environmental, immigrant, housing and economic justice movements to better understand how organizing has been used to engage communities in the process of social change. Through this class, students will gain the hard skills and analytical tools needed to successfully organize campaigns and movements that work to address complex systems of power, privilege, and oppression. As a Community-Engaged Learning course, students will work directly with community organizations on campaigns to address community needs, deepen their knowledge of theory and history through hands-on practice, and develop a critical analysis of inequality at the structural and interpersonal levels. Placements with community organizations are limited. Enrollment will be determined on the first day through a simple application process. Students will have the option to continue the course for a second quarter in the Winter, where they will execute a campaign either on campus or in collaboration with their community partner.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Herrera, B. (PI)

URBANST 110: Utopia and Reality: Introduction to Urban Studies

Designed for freshmen and sophomores. Introduction to the study of cities and urban civilization focusing on the utopias that have been produced over time to guide and inspire city-dwellers to improve and perfect their urban environments. History of urbanization and the urban planning theories inspired by Ebenezer Howard, Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, the New Urbanists and Smart Growth advocates that address current issues such as urban community dynamics, suburbanization, sustainability, and globalization. Public policy approaches designed to address these issues and utopian visions of what cities could be, or should be, in the future. Topic of the final paper chosen by the student, with consent of instructor, and may be a historical research paper, a policy-advocacy paper, or a proposal for an urban utopia that addresses the challenges and possibilities of urban life today.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

URBANST 111: Political Power in American Cities (AMSTUD 121Z, POLISCI 121, PUBLPOL 133)

The major actors, institutions, processes, and policies of sub-state government in the U.S., emphasizing city general-purpose governments through a comparative examination of historical and contemporary politics. Issues related to federalism, representation, voting, race, poverty, housing, and finances.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Nall, C. (PI)

URBANST 112: The Urban Underclass (SOC 149, SOC 249)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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