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1 - 10 of 38 results for: urbanst

URBANST 16SI: Environmental Justice in the Bay Area (EARTHSYS 16SI)

Hands-on, discussion-based class that seeks to expose students to the intersectionality of social justice and environmental well being. Through student-led talks and field trips around the Bay, the course pushes participants to think about connections between issues of privilege, race, health, gender equality, and class in environmental issues. Students from all experiences and fields of study are encouraged to join to gain a sense of place, engage critically with complex challenges, and learn about environmental justice in and out of the classroom.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

URBANST 25Q: The Origins of the Modern American City, 1865-1920 (AMSTUD 25Q, HISTORY 55Q)

Are we living in a new Gilded Age? To answer this question, we go back to the original Gilded Age, as well as its successor, the Progressive Era. How did urban Americans around the turn of the twentieth century deal with stark inequalities of class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality? And what can we learn from their struggles for our own time? Students use primary and secondary sources in digital and print formats. Possible field trip to San Francisco.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)

URBANST 27Q: Sophomore Seminar: Three Detectives, Three Cities

This seminar will analyze the social reality of three historic cities (London in the 1880s and 90s, San Francisco in the 1920s and 30s, and contemporary Shanghai) through the prism of popular crime fiction featuring three great literary detectives (Arthur Conan Doyle¿s Sherlock Holmes, Dashiell Hammett¿s Sam Spade, and Qiu Xiaolong¿s Chief Inspector Chen). As a student in this course, you will explore why crime fiction is so popular, why the fear of crime is so much a part of modern urban culture, and why the police detective and the private investigator have become iconic code heroes of pulp fiction, movies, TV shows, and even video games. If you take this class, you will have the opportunity to write a paper and present your research on one of the classic literary detectives or on one of today¿s related manifestations of the same impulse in mass-market tales of superheroes, vampires, and the zombie apocalypse.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Stout, F. (PI)

URBANST 100A: Pre-field Course for Urban Studies Alternative Spring Break

Limited to students participating in the Alternative Spring Break program. See http://asb.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

URBANST 101: Public Service Internship Preparation (ARTSINST 40, EARTHSYS 9, EDUC 9, HUMBIO 9, PUBLPOL 74)

Are you prepared for your internship this summer? This workshop series will help you make the most of your internship experience by setting learning goals in advance; negotiating and communicating clear roles and expectations; preparing for a professional role in a non-profit, government, or community setting; and reflecting with successful interns and community partners on how to prepare sufficiently ahead of time. You will read, discuss, and hear from guest speakers, as well as develop a learning plan specific to your summer or academic year internship placement. This course is primarily designed for students who have already identified an internship for summer or a later quarter. You are welcome to attend any and all workshops, but must attend the entire series and do the assignments for 1 unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

URBANST 103: Digital Humanities and African American History Black History in the Age of the Digital Database (CSRE 13)

The focus of this workshop is on the social and cultural histories and present conditions relating to social movements and the role of leaders and heroes in urban settings. The workshop seeks to foster historical consciousness of past struggles for justice through collective action as well as to introduce students to a diverse range of leaders of contemporary social justice movements. Additionally, as an underpinning concept, the course explores the changing meaning and importance of social and cultural heroes through history, literature, and music. Workshop activities will divided between sessions with guest speakers and classes held to discuss background concepts and material.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Brown, C. (PI)

URBANST 104: Civic Dreams, Human Spaces: Urban Design with People

Human-centered design of cities and public spaces. Explore the principles underlying vibrant spaces, utilize creative tools and techniques to strengthen the social fabric of communities and enhance benefits to the public, and find new sources of inspiration to inform the urban design process. Take part in real-world design projects in the city of San Francisco and/or other Bay Area communities, while decoding public spaces from multiple perspectives: as sites of recreation, interaction, and political contention; as physical infrastructure that municipalities or grassroots citizen efforts seek to build and maintain for the common good; as places of historical memory, identity, and personal storytelling; and as opportunities for cutting-edge civic innovation. Participants will practice ethical design, utilizing frameworks that are inclusive (for many) and participatory (by many), and that benefit human beings and their diverse communities. Limited enrollment, admission by application. Find out more and apply at dschool.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

URBANST 108: Grassroots Community Organizing: Building Power for Collective Liberation (AFRICAAM 100, CSRE 100, FEMGEN 100X)

This course explores the theory, practice and history of grassroots community organizing as a method for developing community power to promoting social justice. We will develop skills for 1-on-1 relational meetings, media messaging, fundraising strategies, power structure analysis, and strategies organizing across racial/ethnic difference. And we will contextualize these through the theories and practices developed in the racial, gender, queer, environmental, immigrant, housing and economic justice movements to better understand how organizing has been used to engage communities in the process of social change. Through this class, students will gain the hard skills and analytical tools needed to successfully organize campaigns and movements that work to address complex systems of power, privilege, and oppression. As a Community-Engaged Learning course, students will work directly with community organizations on campaigns to address community needs, deepen their knowledge of theory and history through hands-on practice, and develop a critical analysis of inequality at the structural and interpersonal levels. Placements with community organizations are limited. Enrollment will be determined on the first day through a simple application process. Students will have the option to continue the course for a second quarter in the Winter, where they will execute a campaign either on campus or in collaboration with their community partner.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Murray, D. (PI)

URBANST 110: Utopia and Reality: Introduction to Urban Studies

Designed for freshmen and sophomores. Introduction to the study of cities and urban civilization focusing on the utopias that have been produced over time to guide and inspire city-dwellers to improve and perfect their urban environments. History of urbanization and the urban planning theories inspired by Ebenezer Howard, Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, the New Urbanists and Smart Growth advocates that address current issues such as urban community dynamics, suburbanization, sustainability, and globalization. Public policy approaches designed to address these issues and utopian visions of what cities could be, or should be, in the future. Topic of the final paper chosen by the student, with consent of instructor, and may be a historical research paper, a policy-advocacy paper, or a proposal for an urban utopia that addresses the challenges and possibilities of urban life today.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

URBANST 111A: The Politics of the American City

This course will focus on American urban politics ¿- the distinctive nature of local government, its relationship to state government and the separation of powers between states and the federal government. Certain theories about political decision-making and power sharing will be explored. We will try to develop a national perspective on the political dynamics of urban governments and we will probe certain policy areas such as economic development to understand how political choice is embedded within the allocation of resources to meet human needs. The growing transformation among American urban areas due to the rise of the global economy will also be examined. The course will be composed of lectures, class discussions and graded exercises.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Gale, D. (PI)
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