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41 - 50 of 283 results for: all courses

BIO 142: Molecular Geomicrobiology Laboratory (EARTHSYS 143, ESS 143, ESS 243)

In this course, students will be studying the biosynthesis of cyclic lipid biomarkers, molecules that are produced by modern microbes that can be preserved in rocks that are over a billion years old and which geologist use as molecular fossils. Students will be tasked with identifying potential biomarker lipid synthesis genes in environmental genomic databases, expressing those genes in a model bacterial expression system in the lab, and then analyzing the lipid products that are produced. The overall goal is for students to experience the scientific research process including generating hypotheses, testing these hypotheses in laboratory experiments, and communicating their results through a publication style paper. Prerequisites: BIO83 and CHEM35 or permission of the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Welander, P. (PI)

BIO 150: Human Behavioral Biology (HUMBIO 160)

Multidisciplinary. How to approach complex normal and abnormal behaviors through biology. How to integrate disciplines including sociobiology, ethology, neuroscience, and endocrinology to examine behaviors such as aggression, sexual behavior, language use, and mental illness.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Sapolsky, R. (PI)

BIO 153: Cellular Neuroscience: Cell Signaling and Behavior (PSYCH 120)

Neural interactions underlying behavior. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1 or basic biology.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 155: Cell and Developmental Biology of Plants (BIO 255)

In this course we will learn how plants are built at different organizational scales from the cell, tissue, organ and organ system level. We will also learn about the experimental methods used to study plants at these different organizational levels and how to interpret and evaluate experiments that use such methods. Broadly relevant skills that will be cultivated in the course include: evaluating primarily literature, identifying gaps in knowledge, formulating research questions and designing new experimental strategies. Prerequisites: BIO 80 series
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Dinneny, J. (PI)

BIO 158: Developmental Neurobiology (BIO 258)

For advanced undergraduates and coterminal students. The principles of nervous system development from the molecular control of patterning, cell-cell interactions, and trophic factors to the level of neural systems and the role of experience in influencing brain structure and function. Topics: neural induction and patterning cell lineage, neurogenesis, neuronal migration, axonal pathfinding, synapse elimination, the role of activity, critical periods, and the development of behavior. Satisfies Central Menu Areas 2 or 3. Prerequisite: BIO 42 or BIO 82, 83, 84, 86.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 174: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 183: Theoretical Population Genetics (BIO 283)

Models in population genetics and evolution. Selection, random drift, gene linkage, migration, and inbreeding, and their influence on the evolution of gene frequencies and chromosome structure. Models are related to DNA sequence evolution. Prerequisites: calculus and linear algebra, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Feldman, M. (PI)

BIOC 109A: Extending Life by Controlling Chronic Disease (BIO 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

The variability of the human genome and the role of genomic information in research, drug discovery, and human health. Concepts and interpretations of genomic markers in medical research and real life applications. Human genomes in diverse populations. Original contributions from thought leaders in academia and industry and interaction between students and guest lecturers. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOC 109B: The Human Genome and Disease: Genetic Diversity and Personalized Medicine (BIO 109B)

Continuation of 109A/209A. Genetic drift: the path of human predecessors out of Africa to Europe and then either through Asia to Australia or through northern Russia to Alaska down to the W. Coast of the Americas. Support for this idea through the histocompatibility genes and genetic sequences that predispose people to diseases. Guest lectures from academia and pharmaceutical companies. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOE 42: Physical Biology

BIOE 42 is designed to introduce students to general engineering principles that have emerged from theory and experiments in biology. Topics covered will cover the scales from molecules to cells to organisms, including fundamental principles of entropy, diffusion, and continuum mechanics. These topics will link to several biological questions, including DNA organization, ligand binding, cytoskeletal mechanics, and the electromagnetic origin of nerve impulses. In all cases, students will learn to develop toy models that can explain quantitative measurements of the function of biological systems. Prerequisites: MATH 19, 20, 21 CHEM 31A, B (or 31X), PHYSICS 41; strongly recommended: CS 106A, CME 100 or MATH 51, and CME 106; or instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
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