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661 - 670 of 817 results for: all courses

OSPSANTG 44: Introduction to Borderlands Literature of the Americas

Comparative dialogue regarding a variety of perspectives from Chicano/a and LatinAmerican literary studies. Examine autobiographies, fiction, and cultural productions from writers such as Roberto Bolaño (2666), Yuri Herrera (Señales que precederán al fin del mundo), Gloria Anzaldúa (Borderlands/La Frontera), Sara Uribe (Antígona González), Américo Paredes (The Hammon and the Beans), Sandra Cisneros (La casa en Mango), and Helena Viramontes ("The Cariboo Café"). Also focus on the Chilean dictatorship novel Nocturna de Chile by Roberto Bolaño and the Dominican dictatorship novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

OSPSANTG 67: Patagonia in Literature and Film

The course will explore the cultures and histories of Patagonia through literature and film, including historical documents, travel literature, poetry, historical and contemporary short stories and novels, narrative and documentary films to help students become acquainted with the unique geography, heritage and contemporary life of the region. The familiarization with ¿and open discussions around¿ these materials will complement instruction in situ during an extensive visit to Patagonia.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

PEDS 60Q: United Nations Peacekeeping (INTNLREL 60Q)

Focus is on an examination of United Nations peacekeeping, from its inception in 1956 in the wake of the Suez Crisis, to its increasingly important role as an enforcer of political stability in sub-Saharan Africa. Examines the practice of "classic" peacekeeping as it developed during the Cold War, the rise and fall of "second-generation" peacekeeping, and the reemergence of a muscular form of peacekeeping in sub-Saharan Africa more recently. Topics include the basic history of the United Nations since 1945, he fundamentals of the United Nations Charter, and the historical trajectory of U.N. peaeckeeping and the evolving arguments of its proponents and critics over the years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

PEDS 65N: Understanding Children's Health Disparities

The social and economic factors that affect children and their health status. The principal sources of disparities in the health of children in the U.S. are not biologic, but social and economic. Topics include ethnic, cultural, and behavioral factors that affect children's health, both directly and indirectly; lack of health insurance; and current proposals for health care reform, focusing specifically on how they will impact existing health disparities among children.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

PEDS 150: Social and Environmental Determinants of Health (PEDS 250)

Race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status are just a few of the social determinants that contribute to health disparities. Apply a racial equity lens to drive a deeper understanding of how vulnerable populations are uniquely at risk for poorer health outcomes. Explore how where we live, work, learn, and play influences health status, and examine the processes through which social and environmental determinants adversely affect health and drive inequities across the lifespan. With experts from multiple sectors, this course will discuss innovative clinical, public health, policy, advocacy, and community engaged solutions to advance health equity. Explore the unique role of health professionals in addressing health inequities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

PHIL 179A: Feminist and Queer Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines (FEMGEN 103, FEMGEN 203, PHIL 279A)

(Graduate Students register for PHIL 279A or FEMGEN 203) This course is an opportunity to explore the difference feminist and queer perspectives make in creative arts, humanities, and social science research.nPrerequisites: Feminist Studies 101 or equivalent with consent of instructor.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for WAYS credit. The 2 unit option is for graduate students only.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

POLISCI 11N: The Rwandan Genocide

Preference to freshmen. In 1994, more than 800,000 Tutsi and moderate Hutu Rwandans were killed in the most rapid genocide in history. What could bring humans to carry out such violence? Could it have been prevented? Why did no major power intervene to stop the killing? Should the U.N. be held accountable? What were the consequences for Central Africa? How have international actors respond to the challenges of reconstructing Rwanda? What happened to the perpetrators? Sources include scholarly and journalistic accounts.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

POLISCI 28N: The Changing Nature of Racial Identity in American Politics

Almost one-third of Americans now identify with a racial/ethnic minority group. This seminar examines the relationship between racial identity, group consciousness, and public opinion. Topics include the role of government institutions in shaping identification, challenges in defining and measuring race, attitudes towards race-based policies, and the development of political solidarity within racial groups. Particular attention will be paid to the construction of political identities among the growing mixed-race population.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

POLISCI 46N: Contemporary African Politics

Africa has lagged behind the rest of the developing world in terms of three consequential outcomes: economic development, the establishment of social order through effective governance, and the consolidation of democracy. This course seeks to identify the historical and political sources accounting for this lag, to provide extensive case study and statistical material to understand what sustains it, and to examine recent examples of success pointing to a more hopeful future. Students will be asked to develop expertise on one or two African countries and report regularly to fellow students on the progress (or lack thereof) of their countries on each outcome and the reasons for it.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED
Instructors: Laitin, D. (PI)

POLISCI 121L: Racial-Ethnic Politics in US (CSRE 121L, PUBLPOL 121L)

Why is contemporary American politics so sharply divided along racial and party lines? Are undocumented immigrants really more likely to commit crimes than U.S. citizens? What makes a political ad "racist?" The U.S. population will be majority-minority by 2050; what does this mean for future electoral outcomes? We will tackle such questions in this course, which examines various issues surrounding the development of political solidarity within racial groups; the politics of immigration, acculturation, and identification; and the influence of race on public opinion, political behavior, the media, and in the criminal justice system. Prior coursework in Economics or Statistics strongly recommended.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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