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INTNLREL 60Q: United Nations Peacekeeping

Focus is on an examination of United Nations peacekeeping, from its inception in 1956 in the wake of the Suez Crisis, to its increasingly important role as an enforcer of political stability in sub-Saharan Africa. Examines the practice of "classic" peacekeeping as it developed during the Cold War, the rise and fall of "second-generation" peacekeeping, and the reemergence of a muscular form of peacekeeping in sub-Saharan Africa more recently. Topics include the basic history of the United Nations since 1945, he fundamentals of the United Nations Charter, and the historical trajectory of U.N. peaeckeeping and the evolving arguments of its proponents and critics over the years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

INTNLREL 140C: The U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War (HISTORY 201C, INTNLREL 140X)

The involvement of U.S. and the UN in major wars and international interventions since the 1991 Gulf War. The UN Charter's provisions on the use of force, the origins and evolution of peacekeeping, the reasons for the breakthrough to peacemaking and peace enforcement in the 90s, and the ongoing debates over the legality and wisdom of humanitarian intervention. Case studies include Croatia and Bosnia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, East Timor, and Afghanistan. *International Relations majors taking this course to fulfill the WiM requirement should enroll in INTNLREL 140C for 5 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 140X: The U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War (HISTORY 201C, INTNLREL 140C)

The involvement of U.S. and the UN in major wars and international interventions since the 1991 Gulf War. The UN Charter's provisions on the use of force, the origins and evolution of peacekeeping, the reasons for the breakthrough to peacemaking and peace enforcement in the 90s, and the ongoing debates over the legality and wisdom of humanitarian intervention. Case studies include Croatia and Bosnia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, East Timor, and Afghanistan. *International Relations majors taking this course to fulfill the WiM requirement should enroll in INTNLREL 140C for 5 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 141A: Camera as Witness: International Human Rights Documentaries

Rarely screened documentary films, focusing on global problems, human rights issues, and aesthetic challenges in making documentaries on international topics. Meetings with filmmakers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED
Instructors: Bojic, J. (PI)

ITALIAN 101: Italy: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Renowned for its rich cultural tradition, Italy is also one of the most problematic nations in Europe. This course explores the contradictions at the heart of Italy by examining how art and literature provide a unique perspective onto modern Italian history. We will focus on key phenomena that contribute both positively and negatively to the complex "spirit" of Italy, such as the presence of the past, political realism and idealism, revolution, corruption, decadence, war, immigration, and crises of all kinds. Through the study of historical and literary texts, films, and news media, the course seeks to understand Italy's current place in Europe and its future trajectory by looking to its past as a point of comparison. Taught in English.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ITALIC 93: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Challenging

Challenging, is the third part of ITALIC, a year-long course that explores the ways people make and encounter a wide range of artworks, including music and performance, the visual arts, literature, film and other media. How does art contest cultural, political, and social assumptions and values? How does it challenge expectations about its form, medium, or content? Why are some art works difficult? How can we tell when art becomes something else, such as propaganda or marketing? To address these questions we will read work by Michel Foucault, Laura Mulvey, Edward Said, Mikhail Bakhtin, and Buckminster Fuller, among others. We will have the unique opportunity to attend a performance by Meredith Monk, as well as other art experiences (TBD) in the Bay Area. The course continues to enrich its academic endeavors with art-making opportunities in section and in a two-week filmmaking practicum with Adam Tobin. The quarter, and the year, culminates in a three-day field trip to Los Angeles where we will attend a music and/or theatrical performance (TBD), visit the Getty Center, the Broad Art Museum, and Watts Towers, among other important art sites.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

JAPAN 82N: Joys and Pains of Growing Up and Older in Japan

What do old and young people share in common? With a focus on Japan, a country with a large long-living population, this seminar spotlights older people's lives as a reflectiion of culture and society, history, and current social and personal changes. Through discussion of multidisciplinary studies on age, analysis of narratives, and films, we will gain a closer understanding of Japanese society and the multiple meanings of growing up and older. Students will also create a short video/audio profile of an older individual, and we will explore cross-cultural comparisons. Held in Knight Bldg. Rm. 201.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JAPAN 110: Romance, Desire, and Sexuality in Modern Japanese Literature (FEMGEN 110J, FEMGEN 210J, JAPAN 210)

This class is structured around three motifs: love suicide (as a romantic ideal), female desire, and same-sex sexuality. Over the course of the quarter we will look at how these motifs are treated in the art and entertainment from three different moments of Japanese history: the Edo period (1615-1868), the modern period (1920-65), and the contemporary period (1965-present). We will start by focusing on the most traditional representations of these topics. Subsequently, we will consider how later artists and entertainers revisited the conventional treatments of these motifs, informing them with new meanings and social significance. We will devote particular attention to how this material comments upon issues of gender, sexuality, and human relationships in the context of Japan. Informing our perspective will be feminist and queer theories of reading and interpretation.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

JAPAN 148: Modern Japanese Narratives: Literature and Film (JAPAN 248)

Central issues in modern Japanese visual and written narrative. Focus is on competing views of modernity, war, and crises of individual and collective identity and responsibility. Directors and authors include Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, Ozu, Ogai, Akutagawa, Tanizaki, Abe, and Oe.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED
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