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541 - 550 of 792 results for: all courses

HUMBIO 179B: Music and Healing (MUSIC 39B)

To what extent can sound or music heal? This interdisciplinary course asks questions about music and healing around the world, drawing on the fields of medical ethnomusicology, medical anthropology, sound studies, and music therapy. Our case studies will be multi-sited, as we interrogate sound-based healings and healing sounds from diverse cross-cultural, global, and historic perspectives. No musical background is needed to interrogate these issues. We begin with the knowledge that the social, cultural, and political contexts where definitions of music and healing are created inform sound and its various and often conflicting interpretations and meanings.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

HUMCORE 33: Humanities Core: Global Identity, Culture, and Politics from the Middle East (COMPLIT 33, DLCL 33)

How do we face the future? What resources do we have? Which power structures hold us back and which empower us? What are our identities at college in the Bay Area? In 1850s Lebanon, Abu Faris Shidyaq faced all these same questions (except the last one; he was a Christian magazine editor). In this course we will engage with claims about identity, culture, and politics that some might say come from the "Middle East" but that we understand as global. Ganzeer's graphic novel is as much for California as it is for Egypt. Ataturk's speech is about power and identity just like Donald Trump is about power and identity. In Turkish novels and in Arabic poetry, the people we engage in this course look to their pasts and our futures. What happens next? This is the third of three courses in the Middle Eastern track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study Middle Eastern history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.future.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

HUMRTS 108: Advanced Spanish Service-Learning: Migration, Asylum, and Human Rights at the Border

This community engaged learning workshop is open only to students who are concurrently enrolled in SPANLANG 108SL. Through the HUMRTS 108 units, students will have the opportunity to apply their advanced Spanish language skills and knowledge from the class as remote volunteers with immigrant rights advocacy organizations.nnStudents will be trained to work remotely to staff a hotline through with they can help monitor detention conditions, report abuse, and request support on behalf of detainees and their loved ones. They will also have a commitment to work on more projects such as providing interpretations or translations for attorneys or mental/health professionals working remotely with detainees or their families, and/or conducting basic internet research regarding/compilation of news articles or government reports to substantiate asylum claims or fear of persecution. This course requires permission from the instructor to enroll. Please email instructor Vivian Brates vbrates@stanford.edu to get a link to the appropriate web form. Please note that this course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. In AY 2020-21, a letter grade or `CR¿ grade satisfies the Ways requirement.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER
Instructors: Brates, V. (PI)

ILAC 136: Modern Iberian Literatures

1800 to the mid 20th century. Topics include: romanticism; realism and its variants; the turn of the century; modernism and the avant garde; the Civil War; and the first half of the 20th century. Authors may include Mariano Jose de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, Rosalia de Castro, Benito Perez Galdos, Jacint Verdaguer, Eca de Queiros, Miguel de Unamuno, Ramon de Valle-Inclan, Antonio Machado, and Federico García Lorca. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Surwillo, L. (PI)

ILAC 140: Migration in 21st Century Latin American Film (CHILATST 140)

Focus on how images and narratives of migration are depicted in recent Latin American film. It compares migration as it takes place within Latin America to migration from Latin America to Europe and to the U.S. We will analyze these films, and their making, in the global context of an ever-growing tension between "inside" and "outside"; we consider how these films represent or explore precariousness and exclusion; visibility and invisibility; racial and gender dynamics; national and social boundaries; new subjectivities and cultural practices. Films include: Bolivia, Copacabana, La teta asustada, Norteado, Sin nombre, Migración, Ulises, among others. Films in Spanish, with English subtitles. Discussions and assignments in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 149: The Laboring of Diaspora & Border Literary Cultures (COMPLIT 149, CSRE 149)

Focus is given to emergent theories of culture and on comparative literary and cultural studies. How do we treat culture as a social force? How do we go about reading the presence of social contexts within cultural texts? How do ethno-racial writers re-imagine the nation as a site with many "cognitive maps" in which the nation-state is not congruent with cultural identity? How do diaspora and border narratives/texts strive for comparative theoretical scope while remaining rooted in specific local histories. Note: This course must be taken for a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit. In AY 2020-21, a "CR" grade will satisfy the WAYS requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Saldivar, J. (PI)

ILAC 161: Modern Latin American Literature

From independence to the present. A survey of significant authors and works of Hispanic and Brazilian Portuguese literatures, focusing on fictional prose and poetry. Topics include romantic allegories of the nation; modernism and postmodernism; avant-garde poetry; regionalism versus cosmopolitanism; indigenous and indigenist literature; magical realism and the literature of the boom; Afro-Hispanic literature; and testimonial narrative. Authors may include: Bolívar, Bello, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Sarmiento, Machado de Assis, Darío, Martí­, Agustini, Vallejo, Huidobro, Borges, Cortázar, Neruda, Guillon, Rulfo, Ramos, Garcí­a Marquez, Lispector, and Bolaño. As a Writing in the Major (WIM) course, ILAC 161 provides structured opportunities for ILAC and Spanish majors to gradually develop their scholarly writing skills in Spanish. This component of the course is optional for non-majors. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 220E: Renaissance Africa (AFRICAST 220E, COMPLIT 220, ILAC 320E)

Literature and Portuguese expansion into Africa during the sixteenth century. Emphasis on forms of exchange between Portuguese and Africans in Morocco, Angola/Congo, South Africa, the Swahili Coast, and Ethiopia. Readings in Portuguese and English. Taught in English.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 243: Latin American Aesthetics

As the branch of philosophy that deals with the principles of beauty and artistic taste, aesthetics is, purportedly, universal. The course interrogates its conspicuous omission of Latin American theorization and cultural production. Three thematic axes are vanguardia, colonialidad, and populismo; a central concern is aesthetic responses to precariousness. Argentine, Brazilian, Chilean, Colombian, and Cuban essayism and visual arts from the mid 20th century to the present, notably origenismo, neo-baroque, and indigenismo. In collaboration with a cognate course at UC Berkeley. Taught in Spanish.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 277: Senior Seminar: Horror, Gothic, and Fantasy in Spanish

In this course we delve into stories and film where realism is put to the test. From vampires in Havana to mysterious children in Buenos Aires, we work with a constellation of writers who shape minor genres into masterpieces. We'll map the ways in which these narratives work with form (against literary or cinematic realism), affect (eliciting emotional responses), and adaptation (as translations or dislocations of genre, gender, geography, time, and modes of production). The selection includes Bombal, Quiroga, Borges, Cortázar, Lispector, Ocampo, Enríquez, Schweblin, Sandoval, and Del Toro, among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)
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