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391 - 400 of 866 results for: all courses

HISTORY 94B: Japan in the Age of the Samurai

(Same as HISTORY 194B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 194B.) From the Warring States Period to the Meiji Restoration. Topics include the three great unifiers, Tokugawa hegemony, the samurai class, Neoconfucian ideologies, suppression of Christianity, structures of social and economic control, frontiers, the other and otherness, castle-town culture, peasant rebellion, black marketing, print culture, the floating world, National Studies, food culture, samurai activism, black ships, unequal treaties, anti-foreign terrorism, restorationism, millenarianism, modernization as westernization, Japan as imagined community.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI

HISTORY 95: Modern Korean History

(Same as HISTORY 195. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195.) This lecture course provides a general introduction to the history of modern Korea. Themes include the characteristics of the Chosôn dynasty, reforms and rebellions in the nineteenth century, Korean nationalism; Japan's colonial rule and Korean identities; decolonization and the Korean War; and the different state-building processes in North and South, South Korea's democratization in 1980s, and the current North Korean crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Moon, Y. (PI)

HISTORY 101: The Greeks (CLASSICS 83)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 101.) 250 years ago, for almost the first time in history, a few societies rejected kings who claimed to know what the gods wanted and began moving toward democracy. Only once before had this happened--in ancient Greece. This course asks how the Greeks did this, and what they can teach us today. It uses texts and archaeology to trace the material and military sides of the story as well as cultural developments, and looks at Greek slavery and misogyny as well as their achievements. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Morris, I. (PI)

HISTORY 102A: The Romans (CLASSICS 84)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 60.) How did a tiny village create a huge empire and shape the world, and why did it fail? Roman history, imperialism, politics, social life, economic growth, and religious change. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required; enroll in sections on Coursework.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI

HISTORY 114: Origins of History in Greece and Rome (CLASSICS 88)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 117.) The beginnings and development of historical writing in the ancient world. Emphasis on major classical historians and various models of history they invented, from local to imperial, military, cultural, biographical, world history and church history. Focus on themes of power, war, loss, growth and decline, as put by the ancients into historical narrative forms and probed by way of historical questioning and explanation. Attention to how these models resonate still today. Readings in translation: Herodotus, Thucydides, Tacitus, Livy and others. Participation in a weekly discussion section is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Ceserani, G. (PI)

HISTORY 120A: The Russian Empire, 1450-1800

(Same as HISTORY 20A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 120A.) Explores rise of Russian state and expanse of empire; patterns of governance of a Eurasian empire; strategies and institutions of governance; survey of various ethnic and religious groups in empire and their varied cultures and political economies; gender and family; serfdom; Russian Orthodox religion and culture; reforms and Europeanization of 18th century.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 126B: Protestant Reformation (RELIGST 126)

The emergence of Protestant Christianity in 16th-century Europe. Analysis of writings by evangelical reformers (Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, Sattler, Hubmeier, Müntzer) and study of reform movements (Lutheran, Reformed, Anabaptist, Spiritualist) in their medieval context and as expressions of new and influential visions of Christian belief, life, social order.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Pitkin, B. (PI)

HISTORY 12N: The Early Roman Emperors: HIstory, Biography, and Fiction

Preference to freshmen. The politics, drama, and characters of the period after the fall of the Roman Republic in 49 B.C.E. Issues of liberty and autocracy explored by Roman writers through history and biography. The nature of history writing, how expectations about literary genres shape the materials, the line between biography and fiction,and senatorial ideology of liberty. Readings include: Tacitus' Annals, Suetonius' Lives of the Caesers, and Robert Graves' I Claudius and episodes from the BBC series of the same title.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 131: Leonardo's World: Science, Technology, and Art in the Renaissance (HISTORY 31)

(Same as HISTORY 31. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 131.) What did Leonardo actually know? How did he acquire that knowledge? Explores Leonardo¿s interests and accomplishments in such fields as painting, architecture, nengineering, physics, mathematics, geology, anatomy, and physiology, and more generally the nature of Renaissance science, art, and technology. Considers the nrelationship between the society of fifteenth century Italy and the work of the man nfrom Vinci: why did this world produce a Leonardo? How might we use him to understand creativity, innovation, and invention in the Renaissance and beyond? What was his legacy and how did he become a myth? Designed both for students interested in the history of science, medicine, and technology and for students interested in the history and art of Renaissance Italy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 137: The Holocaust (HISTORY 337, JEWISHST 183, JEWISHST 383)

The emergence of modern racism and radical anti-Semitism. The Nazi rise to power and the Jews. Anti-Semitic legislation in the 30s. WW II and the beginning of mass killings in the East. Deportations and ghettos. The mass extermination of European Jewry.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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