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971 - 980 of 1109 results for: all courses

SINY 122: The Agile City

Examine the economic, cultural and environmental forces transforming the urban experience globally and understand how cities become agile to adapt to rapidly evolving urban challenges. This course would draw from case studies in New York and elsewhere, using guest experts and site visits or walking tours.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

SINY 130: Disrupting the News: How Technology is Transforming the Media

Examine how technology has transformed the way news is produced, delivered and consumed from disruption in business models to changes in access. Students read works by leading media scholars, study user data from news organizations and meet key executives in New York City's digital-media market.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SINY 134: The Urban Home Project

Current NYC housing reform goals are mired in politics, real estate development, zoning and bureaucracy. Over a ten week period students will engage in the URBAN HOME PROJECT. The four stages of the course will be to Understand/Locate/Propose/Make. In contrast to current policy strategies, students will explore this subject through an alternative, artistic design lens.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SINY 144: The UN in Action

This course will offer an opportunity to learn how multilateral diplomacy works in practice, taking advantage of the enormous variety of UN offices, agencies, and related policy institutes based in New York to provide an overview of the different dimensions of the UN's work on security, development, human rights, and other multilateral issues.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Gowan, R. (PI)

SINY 148: Grappling with the Global: Gentrification, Immigration, and Sustainability in New York City

This course will examine the impacts of gentrification, immigration, and global environmental concerns on place-making in New York City, deploying ethnographic fieldwork and first-hand accounts of everyday urban life as tools to document and understand urban change.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SINY 168: Safe Cities: A Study of Institutional Responses to Gender Based Violence in the Global City

The course proposes a broad theoretical as well as an experiential and immersive introduction to some of the most urgent issues surrounding institutional responses to gender based violence (GBV) and related forms of gender discrimination today.n nThe course is divided into three main sections: a theoretical framework that introduces students to contemporary arguments and ideas around gender equality, violence, women's empowerment, and legal protections offered under international and domestic law; a critical overview of contemporary New York City and State actors' interventions against gender discrimination, such as the Governor's 2019 Women's Justice Agenda, the Mayor's She Built NYC campaign, and the NYC4CEDAW Act Coalition's campaign for a NYC ordinance for the implementation of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women; and a series of thematic case studies that focus on specific challenges including in the areas of reproductive rights, sexua more »
The course proposes a broad theoretical as well as an experiential and immersive introduction to some of the most urgent issues surrounding institutional responses to gender based violence (GBV) and related forms of gender discrimination today.n nThe course is divided into three main sections: a theoretical framework that introduces students to contemporary arguments and ideas around gender equality, violence, women's empowerment, and legal protections offered under international and domestic law; a critical overview of contemporary New York City and State actors' interventions against gender discrimination, such as the Governor's 2019 Women's Justice Agenda, the Mayor's She Built NYC campaign, and the NYC4CEDAW Act Coalition's campaign for a NYC ordinance for the implementation of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women; and a series of thematic case studies that focus on specific challenges including in the areas of reproductive rights, sexual assault, sex work, trafficking and the rights of people of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities.n nThe latter section will require engagement with actors that are instrumental in responding to and preventing gender based violence, and may include, Victor Madrigal-Borloz the UN Independent Expert on Protection against Violence and Discrimination based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity, Sgt. Greg Accomando of the NYPD Special Victim's Division, Abagail Nelson the Senior Vice President for Programs at Episcopal Relief & Development, and Deborah Hayashi of the North Central Bronx Sexual Assault Response Team. n nThrough these frameworks and studies, the course offers a well-rounded introduction to the complexity of interventions against gender based discrimination in the context of a Global City. The transnational scope of the course is anchored by New York City as an incubator and instigator for innovative interventions against gender inequality, and there will be an emphasis on the cross-pollination that occurs between the City, State and national and international NGO platforms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SLAVIC 70N: Socialism vs. Capitalism: Russian and American Writers' Responses

The turn of the 20th century was marked with turbulent political events and heated discussions about the future of Russian and American societies. Many writers and intellectuals responded to the burning issues of social justice, inequality, egalitarianism, and exploitation associated with capitalism and socialism. Through close reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing, we will engage in the critical discussions of class struggle, individual interest versus collective values, race, and social equality, and identify points of convergence and divergence between the two systems. To what extent was the opposition between capitalism and socialism fueled by the artistic vision of the great Russian and American writers? What was these thinkers' ideal of society and what impact did it have on shaping emerging socialism? Readings for the class include the fundamental works of Fyodor Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy, Jack London, W.E.B. Du Bois and Sholem Aleichem. The course will culminate in a digital mapping project visualizing intellectual connections between ideas and writers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Ilchuk, Y. (PI)

SLAVIC 121: Ukraine at a Crossroads (SLAVIC 221)

Literally meaning "borderland," Ukraine has embodied in-betweenness in all possible ways. What is the mission of Ukraine in Europe and in Eurasia? How can Ukraine become an agent of democracy, stability, and unity? What does Ukraine's case of multiple identities and loyalties offer to our understanding of the global crisis of national identity? In this course, we will consider the historical permeability of Ukraine's territorial, cultural, and ethnic borders as an opportunity to explore the multiple dimensions of its relations with its neighbors. In addition to studying historical, literary, and cinematic texts, we discuss nationalism, global capitalism, memory politics, and propaganda in order to understand post-Euromaidan society. All required texts are in English. No knowledge of Ukrainian is required. NOTE: To satisfy a WAYS requirement, this course must be taken for at least 3 units. In AY 2020-21, a `CR¿ grade will satisfy the WAYS requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Ilchuk, Y. (PI)

SLAVIC 183: Jews in the Contemporary World:  The American Jewish Present & Past in Popular Culture,  Film, & TV (CSRE 185B, HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, JEWISHST 185B, REES 185B)

( HISTORY 185B is 5 units; HISTORY 85B IS 3 units.) Who are American Jews as depicted in popular media -- film, television, etc. -- since the Second World War? How are their religion, politics, mores, and practices represented and what ways, if at all, do such portraits reflect historical trends among Jews and society in general? What can be learned from film or tv about Jewish identity, notions of Jewish power and powerlessness, communal cohesiveness and assimilation, sexuality and the wages of intermarriage or race?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SLAVIC 198: Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature (JEWISHST 148, JEWISHST 348, SLAVIC 398)

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well. ***This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit***
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Safran, G. (PI)
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