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521 - 530 of 1106 results for: all courses

HISTORY 137D: Germany's Wars and the World, 1848-2010 (HISTORY 37D)

( History 37D is 3 units; History 137D is 5 units.)This course examines a series of explosive encounters between Germans, Europe, and the world. Starting with the overlooked revolutions of 1848 and ending with the reunification of West Germany and East Germany after the Cold War, the course will explore a range of topics: capitalism, communism, imperialism, nationalism, diplomacy, antisemitism, gender, race, and the Holocaust, among others. We will also consider competing visions of Germany its borders, its members, its enemies.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 139: Modern Britain and the British Empire

(Same as HISTORY 39. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 139.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 140: World History of Science

( History 40 is 3 units; History 140 is 5 units.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HISTORY 140A: The Scientific Revolution

What do people know and how do they know it? What counts as scientific knowledge? In the 16th and 17th centuries, understanding the nature of knowledge engaged the attention of individuals and institutions including Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, the early Royal Society, and less well-known contemporaries. New meanings of observing, collecting, experimenting, and philosophizing, and political, religious, and cultural ramifications in early modern Europe.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 144: Sex, Gender, and Intersectional Analysis in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment (FEMGEN 144)

( HISTORY 44 is offered for 3 units; HISTORY 144 is offered for 5 units.) Explores "Gendered Innovations" or how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis in research sparks discovery and innovation. Section 1 focuses on the history of women in science. Section 2 looks at transforming research institutions. Section 3 explores Gendered Innovations. Topics include historical background, basic concepts, social robots, sustainability, medicine & public health, facial recognition, inclusive crash test dummies, and more. Stanford University is engaged in a multi-year collaboration with the European Commission and the U.S. National Science Foundation project on Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment, and this class will contribute that project. The operative questions is: how can sex, gender, and intersectional analysis lead to discovery and enhance social equalities?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 145B: Africa in the 20th Century (AFRICAAM 145B)

(Same as HISTORY 45B. Students taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Cabrita, J. (PI)

HISTORY 146: History of Humanitarian Aid in sub-Saharan Africa

Explores humanitarian endeavors through the era of the slave trade, colonialism, the Cold War and the present. Our focus is both local and global examining international humanitarian policy and the effects and perceptions of humanitarian aid within different African localities. Assignments use primary and secondary sources including organizational reports, ethnographies, memoirs and film. Topics: anti-slave trade and abolition movements, `civilizing¿ missions, development, refugees, peacekeeping, famine and women's rights.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 147: History of South Africa (AFRICAAM 147, CSRE 174)

(Same as HISTORY 47. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 148: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, CLASSICS 82, HISTORY 48)

This course traces the emergence and development of the distinctive cultural world of the ancient Egyptians over nearly 4,000 years. Through archaeological and textual evidence, we will investigate the social structures, religious beliefs, and expressive traditions that framed life and death in this extraordinary region. Students with or without prior background are equally encouraged.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bartos, N. (PI)

HISTORY 150A: Colonial and Revolutionary America (AMSTUD 150A)

( HISTORY 50A is 3 units. HISTORY 150A is 5 units) This course surveys early American history from the onset of English colonization of North America in the late sixteenth century through the American Revolution and the creation of the United States in the late eighteenth. It situates the origins and the development of colonial American society as its peoples themselves experienced it, within the wider histories of the North American continent and the Atlantic basin. It considers the diversity of peoples and empires that made up these worlds as well as the complex movement of goods, peoples, and ideas that defined them. The British North American colonies were just one interrelated part of this wider complex. Yet out of that interconnected Atlantic world, those particular colonies produced a revolution for national independence that had a far-reaching impact on the world. The course, accordingly, explores the origins of this revolutionary movement and the nation state that it wrought, one that would rapidly ascend to hemispheric and then global prominence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
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