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901 - 910 of 1032 results for: all courses

SINY 168: Safe Cities: A Study of Institutional Responses to Gender Based Violence in the Global City

The course proposes a broad theoretical as well as an experiential and immersive introduction to some of the most urgent issues surrounding institutional responses to gender based violence (GBV) and related forms of gender discrimination today.n nThe course is divided into three main sections: a theoretical framework that introduces students to contemporary arguments and ideas around gender equality, violence, women's empowerment, and legal protections offered under international and domestic law; a critical overview of contemporary New York City and State actors' interventions against gender discrimination, such as the Governor's 2019 Women's Justice Agenda, the Mayor's She Built NYC campaign, and the NYC4CEDAW Act Coalition's campaign for a NYC ordinance for the implementation of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women; and a series of thematic case studies that focus on specific challenges including in the areas of reproductive rights, sexua more »
The course proposes a broad theoretical as well as an experiential and immersive introduction to some of the most urgent issues surrounding institutional responses to gender based violence (GBV) and related forms of gender discrimination today.n nThe course is divided into three main sections: a theoretical framework that introduces students to contemporary arguments and ideas around gender equality, violence, women's empowerment, and legal protections offered under international and domestic law; a critical overview of contemporary New York City and State actors' interventions against gender discrimination, such as the Governor's 2019 Women's Justice Agenda, the Mayor's She Built NYC campaign, and the NYC4CEDAW Act Coalition's campaign for a NYC ordinance for the implementation of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women; and a series of thematic case studies that focus on specific challenges including in the areas of reproductive rights, sexual assault, sex work, trafficking and the rights of people of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities.n nThe latter section will require engagement with actors that are instrumental in responding to and preventing gender based violence, and may include, Victor Madrigal-Borloz the UN Independent Expert on Protection against Violence and Discrimination based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity, Sgt. Greg Accomando of the NYPD Special Victim's Division, Abagail Nelson the Senior Vice President for Programs at Episcopal Relief & Development, and Deborah Hayashi of the North Central Bronx Sexual Assault Response Team. n nThrough these frameworks and studies, the course offers a well-rounded introduction to the complexity of interventions against gender based discrimination in the context of a Global City. The transnational scope of the course is anchored by New York City as an incubator and instigator for innovative interventions against gender inequality, and there will be an emphasis on the cross-pollination that occurs between the City, State and national and international NGO platforms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SLAVIC 183: Jews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture (CSRE 185B, HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, JEWISHST 185B, REES 185B)

(Same as HISTORY 85B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 1: Introduction to Sociology at Stanford

This course to get students to think like a sociologist; to use core concepts and theories from the field of sociology to make sense of the most pressing issues of our time: race and ethnicity; gender and sexuality; family; education; social class and economic inequality; social connectedness; social movements; and immigration. The course will draw heavily on the research and writing of Stanford¿s own sociologist.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 2: Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology (PSYCH 70)

Why do people behave the way they do? This is the fundamental question that drives social psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a variety of exciting issues including: what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; the effects of social influence and persuasion on individual thoughts, emotion, and behavior; and how the lessons of social psychology can be applied in contexts such as health, work, and relationships. The social forces studied in the class shape our behavior, though their operation cannot be seen directly. A central idea of this class is that awareness of these forces allows us to make choices in light of them, offering us more agency and wisdom in our everyday lives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 3: America: Unequal (CSRE 3P, PUBLPOL 113)

It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that the rich would be so rich and the poor so poor. It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that opportunities to get ahead would depend so profoundly on one's family circumstances and other starting conditions. How could this have happened in the "land of opportunity?" What are the effects of such profound inequality? And what, if anything, should be done about it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 8: Sport, Competition, and Society

This course uses the tools of social science to help understand debates and puzzles from contemporary sports, and in doing so shows how sports and other contests provide many telling examples of enduring social dynamics and larger social trends. We also consider how sport serves as the entry point for many larger debates about the morality and ethics raised by ongoing social change.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

SOC 18N: Ethics, Morality, and Markets

Markets are inescapably entangled with questions of right and wrong. What counts as a fair price or a fair wage? Should people be able to sell their organs? Do companies have a responsibility to make sure algorithmic decisions don't perpetuate racism and misogyny? Even when market exchange seems coldly rational, it still embodies normative ideas about the right ways to value objects and people and to determine who gets what. In this seminar, we will study markets as social institutions permeated with moral meaning. We will explore how powerful actors work to institutionalize certain understandings of good and bad; unpack how particular moral visions materially benefit some groups of people more so than others; examine the ways people draw on notions of fairness to justify and contest the market's distribution of resources and opportunities; and consider who has agency to build markets according to different normative ideals. Most course readings are empirical research, so we will also critically discuss how social scientists use data and methods to build evidence about the way the world works.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kiviat, B. (PI)

SOC 20N: What counts as "race," and why? (CSRE 20N)

Preference to freshmen. Seminar discussion of how various institutions in U.S. society employ racial categories, and how race is studied and conceptualized across disciplines. Course introduces perspectives from demography, history, law, genetics, sociology, psychology, and medicine. Students will read original social science research, learn to collect and analyze data from in-depth interviews, and use library resources to conduct legal/archival case studies.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 22N: The Roots of Social Protest

Preference to freshmen. The conditions under which social protest occurs and the emergence, success, and viability of contemporary social movements. Examples include women's civil rights, ecology, and antiwar and anti-globilization movements in the U.S. and elsewhere. Sociological theories to explain the timing, location, and causes of mobilization; how researchers evaluate these theories. Comparison of tactics, trajectories, and outcomes.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

SOC 45Q: Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society (CSRE 45Q)

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)
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