2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

601 - 610 of 651 results for: all courses

SLAVIC 194: Russia: Literature, Film, Identity, Alterity (SLAVIC 394)

How do Russian literature and film imagine Russian identity ¿ and, in contrast, the ethnic or national Other? Does political and literary theory analyzing national identity and the literary imagination elsewhere hold true in the Russian context? Texts include works by Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Blok, Mayakovsky, Platonov; Soviet and post-Soviet films; theory and history. Recommended for returnees from Moscow, Slavic majors, and CREEES MA students. Accepted for IR credit. Readings in English and films subtitled; additional section for Russian readers. Taught in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

SLE 93: Structured Liberal Education

Focusing on great works of philosophy, religion, literature, painting, and film drawn largely from the Western tradition, the SLE curriculum places particular emphasis on artists and intellectuals who brought new ways of thinking and new ways of creating into the world, often overthrowing prior traditions in the process. These are the works that redefined beauty, challenged the authority of conventional wisdom, raised questions of continuing importance to us today, and¿for good or ill¿created the world we still live in. Texts may include: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Du Bois, Eliot, Woolf, Kafka, Brecht, Vertov, Beauvoir, Sartre, Fanon, Gandhi, and Morrison.
Terms: Spr | Units: 8 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:IHUM-3, THINK, WAY-ED, Writing SLE

SOC 2: Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology (PSYCH 70)

Why do people behave the way they do? This is the fundamental question that drives social psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a variety of exciting issues including: what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; the effects of social influence and persuasion on individual thoughts, emotion, and behavior; and how the lessons of social psychology can be applied in contexts such as health, work, and relationships. The social forces studied in the class shape our behavior, though their operation cannot be seen directly. A central idea of this class is that awareness of these forces allows us to make choices in light of them, offering us more agency and wisdom in our everyday lives.nnnThis course is offered for 3-4 units. The 4 unit option has weekly discussion sections while the 3 unit version does not.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 20N: What counts as "race," and why?

Preference to freshmen. Seminar discussion of how race is conceptualized and how categorizations are determined across a range of disciplines and institutions in U.S. society. Course materials survey approaches from history, demography, law, sociology, psychology, genetics, and medicine. Students will read original social science research, learn to conduct and analyze in-depth interviews, and use library resources to support legal/archival case studies.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 45Q: Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society (CSRE 45Q)

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 129X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ball, A. (PI)

SOC 134: Education, Gender, and Development (EDUC 197, FEMGEN 297)

Theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to the role of education in changing, modifying, or reproducing structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Cross-national research on the status of girls and women and the role of development organizations and processes.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Yiu, L. (PI)

SOC 140: Introduction to Social Stratification (SOC 240)

(Graduate students register for 240.) The main classical and modern explanations of the causes of social, economic, and political inequality. Issues include: power; processes that create and maintain inequality; the central axes of inequality in contemporary societies (race, ethnicity, class, and gender); the consequences of inequality for individuals and groups; and how social policy can mitigate and exacerbate inequality. Cases include technologically simple groups, the Indian caste system, and the modern U.S.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 141: Controversies about Inequality (SOC 241)

(Graduate students register for 241.) Debate format involving Stanford and guest faculty. Forms of inequality including racial, ethnic, and gender stratification; possible policy interventions. Topics such as welfare reform, immigration policy, affirmative action, discrimination in labor markets, sources of income inequality, the duty of rich nations to help poor nations, and causes of gender inequality.
Last offered: Autumn 2010 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 142: Sociology of Gender

The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the sociological conceptualization of gender. Through the sociological lens, gender is not an individual attribute or a role, but rather a system of social practices that constructs two different categories of people men and women and organizes social interaction and inequality around this difference. First we will explore what ¿gender¿ is according to sociologists and the current state of gender inequality in the labor market, at home, and at school. We will then investigate how gender structures our everyday lives through the individual, interactional, and institutional levels. Finally, we will discuss avenues for reducing gender inequality. Throughout the course, we will prioritize reading, evaluating, and questioning sociological theory and research on gender."
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints