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451 - 460 of 586 results for: all courses

OSPCPTWN 38: Genocide: African Experiences in Comparative Perspective

Genocide as a major social and historical phenomenon, contextualized within African history. Time frame ranging from the extermination of indigenous Canary Islanders in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries to more recent mass killings in Rwanda and Darfur. Emphasis on southern African case studies such Cape San communities and the Herero people in Namibia. Themes include: roles of racism, colonialism and nationalism in the making of African genocides. Relevance of other social phenomena such as modernity, Social Darwinism, ethnicity, warfare and revolution. Comparative perspective to elucidate global dimensions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED
Instructors: Adhikari, M. (PI)

OSPCPTWN 60: Hip Hop in Post-apartheid South Africa

Politics of multilingualism, diversity and hip-hop identity performances and practices in a transforming South Africa. How far has social change been realized given that South Africa's citizens still grapple with racial, ethnic, cultural and cultural marginalization and exploitation?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPCPTWN 70: Youth Citizenship and Community Engagement

Critical thinking about core concepts in community engagement such as community, self, and identity. The course aims to cultivate a critical consciousness about the meaning of charity, caring, social justice and the aims of engagement with communities to enhance self awareness, awareness of others who are different, awareness of social issues, and an ethic of care where students can be change agents. The meaning of youth citizenship as it relates to engagement with communities will be explored.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

OSPFLOR 8: Migration and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary Italy

Exploration of the media as an arena where Italian national and individual identities (of both migrants and natives) are being redefined in an age of globalization, massive migration flows and increasing social diversity. Over the last thirty years, Italy has been transformed from a country of exclusive emigration into a country where recent immigration is becoming one of the most controversial issues faced by Italian society and the political system today.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

OSPFLOR 11: Film, Food and the Italian Identity

Food in Italian cinema staged as an allegory of Italy¿s social, political and cultural milieu. Intersections between food, history and culture as they are reflected in and shaped by Italian cinema from the early 1900s until today. Topics include: farmer's tradition during Fascism; lack of food during WWII and its aftermath; the Economic Miracle; food and the Americanization of Italy; La Dolce Vita; the Italian family; ethnicity, globalization and the re-discovery of regional culinary identity in contemporary Italy. Impact of cinema in both reflecting and defining the relationship between food and culture.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Campani, E. (PI)

OSPFLOR 14: Growing up American; Growing up Italian

To what extent is it possible to characterize and describe the experience of growing up either "American" or "Italian"? This course will explore our self-constitution as "Americans," while discovering how the interactional, institutional, and ideational differences of the Italian cultural context produce individuals with related, but different, ways of being a self. By engaging in both aesthetic and experiential learning, we hope to learn about: 1) the sociocultural constitution of selves; 2) the specificity of the American self; 3) an appreciation for the historical and cultural specificity of the Italian self. The course will be organized around several key social practices and institutions that shape selves and cultures. After first examining hypotheses about different models of the self, students will walk out into the city of Florence to investigate different domains of life through analyses of cultural products and visits to schools, churches, sporting events, museums, government offices, grocery stores, street markets, retail shops, restaurants and cafes. Each week will focus on a different topic, among which will be Family, Food, Religion, School, Sports, Dating, Literature and Culture, and Art and Architecture. The course will end with a wrap-up where students can present to the class their preliminary findings. Course requirements include 200-word weekly postings, participation in assigned activities, one 5-page paper, and a short final paper as part of a final group presentation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

OSPFLOR 34: The Virgin Mother, Goddess of Beauty, Grand Duchess, and the Lady: Women in Florentine Art

Influence and position of women in the history of Florence as revealed in its art. Sculptural, pictorial, and architectural sources from a social, historical, and art historical point of view. Themes: the virgin mother (middle ages); the goddess of beauty (Botticelli to mannerism); the grand duchess (late Renaissance, Baroque); the lady, the woman (19th-20th centuries).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Verdon, T. (PI)

OSPFLOR 67: The Celluloid Gaze: Gender, Identity and Sexuality in Cinema

Film in the social construction of gender through the representation of the feminine, the female, and women. Female subjects, gaze, and identity through a historical, technical, and narrative frame. Emphasis is on gender, identity, and sexuality with references to feminist film theory from the early 70s to current methodologies based on semiotics, psychoanalysis, and cultural studies. Advantages and limitations of methods for textual analysis and the theories which inform them.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Campani, E. (PI)

OSPKYOTO 25: Japan and China in the Early Modern World

Japan and China before and during their transition to modernity. Topics include: China's impact on the formation of Japanese civilization in the 6th through 15th centuries CE; the 16th century, when European merchants and missionaries first reached East Asia; early twentieth century, when European and American steamships dominated the Pacific. Historical dynamics of Japanese and Chinese societies during these centuries, their connections and contrasts, as well as the profound impact that each has had on the other. How did Sino-Japanese relations in the early modern era lay the foundations for the current fraught relationship between these two East Asian powers?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Sommer, M. (PI)

OSPMADRD 45: Women in Art: Case Study in the Madrid Museums

Viewing the collections at the Prado Museum through study and analysis of the representations of women. Contemporary literary texts and images that situate paintings in the historical, social, and political conditions that produced the works.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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