2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

351 - 360 of 586 results for: all courses

HISTORY 174: Mexico Since 1876: HIstory of a "Failed State"?

(Same as History 374.) This course is an introduction to the history and diverse peoples of modern Mexico from 1876 to the present. Through lectures, discussions, primary and secondary readings, short documentaries, and written assignments, students will critically explore and analyze the multiplicity of historical processes, events and trends that shaped and were shaped by Mexicans over the course of a century. The course will cover some of the social and political dimensions of rural social change, urbanization and industrialization, technological innovation and misuse, environmental degradation and conservation, education, ideology, culture and media, migration, and the drug trade.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED

HISTORY 181B: Formation of the Contemporary Middle East

The history of the Middle East since WW I, focusing on the eastern Arab world, Egypt, the Fertile Crescent, and the Arabian Peninsula, with attention to Turkey, Iran, and Israel.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 184: Zionism and the State of Israel (CSRE 184C, JEWISHST 184, REES 184)

(Same as History 84.) Hotly contested still, this course will open up the movement's ideas, practices, achievements and crises in such a way as to allow students to hear the fullest range of voices - Jewish, Arab, religious, secular, etc. It will track the movement from its appearance in the late nineteenth century until the establishment of State of Israel in 1948, and beyond.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 185B: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Vulnerability and Visibility (CSRE 185B, HISTORY 385C, JEWISHST 185B, REES 185B)

This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 187: The Islamic Republics: Politics and Society in Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan

(Same as HISTORY 87. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 187.) Explores the contested politics of these societies in modern times. Topics include controversies surrounding the meaning of revolution, state building, war, geopolitics, Islamic law, clerical authority, gender, an Islamic economy, culture and ethnic, national and religious identities from the 1940s to the present. Assignments will focus on primary sources (especially legal documents, poetry, novels, and memoirs) and films.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 195X: Islam in India: Conflict and Accommodation (RELIGST 111)

This course will investigate the history of Islam in South Asia, particularly interactions between Muslims and Hindus, through the lenses of conflict and accommodation. This topic has become increasingly important in modern times as India and neighboring nations experience sectarian violence and simultaneously strive to engender the peaceful coexistence of multiple religious communities. In many ways the debate over South Asia¿s present and future is being played out in regards to interpretations of its past. In this course, students will gain a solid overview of the chronological development of Islam in India and its negotiations with other religious traditions on the subcontinent. We will think critically about the relevance of South Asia¿s past to its present and the crucial role of forms of Indian Islam in the broader context of Islamic cultures across the globe.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

HISTORY 201C: The U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War (INTNLREL 140C)

The involvement of U.S. and the UN in major wars and international interventions since the 1991 Gulf War. The UN Charter's provisions on the use of force, the origins and evolution of peacekeeping, the reasons for the breakthrough to peacemaking and peace enforcement in the 90s, and the ongoing debates over the legality and wisdom of humanitarian intervention. Case studies include Croatia and Bosnia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, East Timor, and Afghanistan. * Course satisfies the WiM requirement for International Relations majors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 203E: Global Catholicism (INTNLREL 103E)

The rise of Catholicism as a global phenomenon, and its multiple transformations as it spread to the Americas, Asia, and Africa. Topics include the Reformation, Tridentine reform and the Jesuits, the underground churches in England and the Dutch Republic, the missions to Asia, the Spanish conquest of Latin America, conversion and indigenous religions, missionary imperialism and new religious movements in the non-European world.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 207C: The Global Early Modern (HISTORY 307C)

In what sense can we speak of "globalization" before modernity? What are the characteristics and origins of the economic system we know as "capitalism"? When and why did European economies begin to diverge from those of other Eurasian societies? With these big questions in mind, the primary focus will be on the history of Europe and European empires, but substantial readings deal with other parts of the world, particularly China and the Indian Ocean.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 212: Knights, Monks, and Nobles: Masculinity in the Middle Ages (FEMGEN 212X, FEMGEN 312, HISTORY 312, RELIGST 212X, RELIGST 312X)

This course considers masculinity as historically and culturally contingent, focusing on the experiences and representations of medieval men as heroes, eunuchs, fathers, priests, husbands, boys, and fighting men. Recognizing that the lives of men, like those of women, were governed by gendered rules and expectations, we will explore a wide range of medieval masculinities, paying close attention to the processes by which manhood could be achieved (e.g. martial, spiritual, sexual), and to competing versions of manliness, from the warrior hero of the early middle ages to the suffering Christ of late medieval religion.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints