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601 - 610 of 771 results for: all courses

POLISCI 126P: Constitutional Law (COMM 152, COMM 252)

This course covers Supreme Court case law concerning governmental powers, equal protection, and certain fundamental rights. The course investigates the constitutional foundation for democratic participation in the United States, covering topics such as the Fourteenth Amendment's protections against discrimination on grounds of race, gender, and other classifications, as well as the individual rights to voting and intimate association, and an introduction to First Amendment rights of free speech and press. Students will be evaluated on class participation, a midterm moot court with both a written and oral component, and a take-home final exam. Lectures will be twice per week and a discussion section once per week.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

POLISCI 127P: Economic Inequality and Political Dysfunction

This course will examine how two of the defining features of contemporary U.S. politics, economic inequality and political polarization, relate to each other and to Congressional gridlock. The reading list will focus on several books recently authored by preeminent political scientists on this important topic. The course will cover a range of topics, including the disparity in political representation of the preferences of the affluent over those of the poor, the origins of Congressional polarization, the influence of money in politics, budgetary politics, immigration policy, and electoral and institutional barriers to reform.
Last offered: Winter 2013 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

POLISCI 147P: The Politics of Inequality

This course is about the distribution of power in contemporary democratic societies, and especially in the US: who governs? Is there a ``power elite?'' Or, does public policy making accommodate a wide range of interests? What is the relationship between income and power? What are the political consequences of increasing income inequality? What are the implications of racial and ethnic inequities for the quality of democratic representation? Which policies increase political inequities? What are effective remedies for unequal influence? Finally, which institutions move democratic practice furthest towards full democratic equality? This course will address these questions, focusing first on the local distribution of power, and then in state and national levels of government, in a broadly comparative context. Students will have the opportunity to work with income and labor force surveys in a mid-term assignment, and in a final paper, to examine different dimensions of American inequality and their implications for the quality of American democracy.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

POLISCI 148: Chinese Politics: The Transformation and the Era of Reform (POLISCI 348)

Overview of the reforms in China since 1978 that have made its economy one of the fastest growing in the world yet it still has the Chinese Communist Party at the helm wielding one party rule. Key questions addressed include the following: What has been the process and challenges of reform that have reshaped China¿s economic landscape? What are the political consequences of these dramatic economic changes? Why has the CCP remained strong while other communist regimes have failed? Markets have spread but what is the role of the state? What are the opportunities for political participation and prospects for political change? Materials will include readings, lectures, and selected films. This course has no prerequisites. (Graduate students register for 348.) This fulfills the Writing in the Major requirement for PoliSci majors.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

POLISCI 149S: Islam, Iran, and the West

Changes in relative power and vitality of each side. The relationship in the Middle Ages revolved around power and domination, and since the Renaissance around modernity. Focus is on Muslims of the Middle East.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

POLISCI 152: Introduction to Game Theoretic Methods in Political Science (POLISCI 352)

Concepts and tools of non-cooperative game theory developed using political science questions and applications. Formal treatment of Hobbes' theory of the state and major criticisms of it; examples from international politics. Primarily for graduate students; undergraduates admitted with consent of instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SI

POLISCI 211: Political Economy of East Asia (INTNLREL 159)

(Formerly 117.) Comparative and international political economy of E.and S.E. Asia. Industrial development and the Asian miracle, economic integration, regional cooperation, the Asian financial crisis, and contemporary challenges.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

POLISCI 212C: Civil War and International Politics: Syria in Context (POLISCI 212X)

The Syrian civil war is both a humanitarian disaster and a focal point for a set of interlocking regional and international political struggles. This course uses the Syrian case as an entry for exploring broader questions, such as why do civil wars begin, how do they end, and what are the international politics of civil war. Please enroll in 212C for WIM credit.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

POLISCI 212X: Civil War and International Politics: Syria in Context (POLISCI 212C)

The Syrian civil war is both a humanitarian disaster and a focal point for a set of interlocking regional and international political struggles. This course uses the Syrian case as an entry for exploring broader questions, such as why do civil wars begin, how do they end, and what are the international politics of civil war. Please enroll in 212C for WIM credit.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

POLISCI 213E: Introduction to European Studies (INTNLREL 122)

This course offers an introduction to major topics in the study of historical and contemporary Europe. We focus on European politics, economics and culture. First, we study what makes Europe special, and how its distinct identity has been influenced by its history. Next, we analyze Europe's politics. We study parliamentary government and proportional representation electoral systems, and how they affect policy. Subsequently, we examine the challenges the European economy faces. We further study the European Union and transatlantic relations.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Crombez, C. (PI)
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