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441 - 450 of 773 results for: all courses

HISTORY 257C: LGBT/Queer Life in the United States (FEMGEN 140D, FEMGEN 240D)

An introductory course that explores LGBT/Queer social, cultural, and political history in the United States. By analyzing primary documents that range from personal accounts (private letters, autobiography, early LGBT magazines, and oral history interviews) to popular culture (postcards, art, political posters, lesbian pulp fiction, and film) to medical, military, and legal papers, students will understand how the categories of gender and sexuality have changed over the past 150 years. This class investigates the relationship among queer, straight and transgender identities. Seminar discussions will question how the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality influenced the construction of these categories.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Davies, A. (PI)

HISTORY 258: Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form (available on Coursework) by Dec. 1, 2015 and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 259E: American Interventions, 1898-Present (HISTORY 359E, INTNLREL 168A)

This class seeks to examine the modern American experience with limited wars, beginning with distant and yet pertinent cases, and culminating in the war in Iraq. Although this class will examine war as a consequence of foreign policy, it will not focus primarily on presidential decision making. Rather, it will place wartime policy in a broader frame, considering it alongside popular and media perceptions of the war, the efforts of antiwar movements, civil-military relations, civil reconstruction efforts, and conditions on the battlefield. We will also examine, when possible, the postwar experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 260: California's Minority-Majority Cities (CSRE 260, URBANST 169)

Historical development and the social, cultural, and political issues that characterize large cities and suburbs where communities of color make up majority populations. Case studies include cities in Los Angeles, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties. Comparisons to minority-majority cities elsewhere in the U.S. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

HISTORY 261G: Presidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History (INTNLREL 173)

Nothing better illustrates the evolution of the modern presidency than the arena of foreign policy. This class will examine the changing role and choices of successive presidential administrations over the past century, examining such factors as geopolitics, domestic politics, the bureaucracy, ideology, psychology, and culture. Students will be encouraged to think historically about the institution of the presidency, while examining specific case studies, from the First World War to the conflicts of the 21st century.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 264G: The Social History of Mental Illness in the United States

(Formerly HPS 158.) Explores the variety of meanings of mental illness in the past, and the diagnostic, therapeutic, cultural and policy challenges historically posed by mental illness. Focus is on the U.S. but is not limited to it. How has mental illness been defined in history? How has the mind been medicalized and managed? Topics include the rise of institutions for the mentally ill, the growth of the psychiatric profession and the relationship between psychiatry, deviance and anti-psychiatry,and gender and psychiatric norms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Horn, M. (PI)

HISTORY 265: Writing Asian American History (AMSTUD 265, ASNAMST 265, HISTORY 365)

Recent scholarship in Asian American history, with attention to methodologies and sources. Topics: racial ideologies, gender, transnationalism, culture, and Asian American art history. Primary research paper.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 266C: The Cold War: An International History (INTNLREL 154)

Though it ended twenty years ago, we still live in a world shaped by the Cold War. Beginning with its origins in the mid-1940s, this course will trace the evolution of the global struggle, until its culmination at the end of the 1980s. Students will be asked to ponder the fundamental nature of the Cold War, what kept it alive for nearly fifty years, how it ended, and its long term legacy for the world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 272E: Theories of Citizenship and Sovereignty in a Transnational Context (AMSTUD 272E, CHILATST 172, CSRE 172H, FEMGEN 272E, HISTORY 372E)

This course explores the multiple meanings of citizenship and the ways in which they change when examined using different geographic scales (from the local to the transnational). The course will pair theoretical readings on citizenship with case studies that focus on North America. Topics include: definitions of citizenship; the interrelation of ideas of citizenship with those of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality; the relationship between sovereignty and territoriality; human and civil rights; and immigration.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 274E: Urban Poverty and Inequality in Latin America

We examine historical issues of social inequality, poverty, crime, industrialization, globalization, and environment in major Latin American cities.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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