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411 - 420 of 475 results for: all courses

SOC 1: Introduction to Sociology at Stanford

The Stanford Sociology department includes some of the best-known and most influential thinkers in the discipline. This class will be an opportunity to meet them and hear about their research and other interests that occupy them as professional sociologists. As you learn about their work, you also will learn about key concepts, methods, and theoretical orientations within sociology.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 16N: African Americans and Social Movements (AFRICAAM 16N, CSRE 16N)

Theory and research on African Americans' roles in post-Civil Rights, US social movements. Topics include women¿s right, LGBT rights, environmental movement, and contemporary political conservativism.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 22N: The Roots of Social Protest

Preference to freshmen. The conditions under which social protest occurs and the emergence, success, and viability of contemporary social movements. Examples include women's civil rights, ecology, and antiwar and anti-globilization movements in the U.S. and elsewhere. Sociological theories to explain the timing, location, and causes of mobilization; how researchers evaluate these theories. Comparison of tactics, trajectories, and outcomes.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Olzak, S. (PI)

SOC 45Q: Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society (CSRE 45Q)

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 107: China After Mao (SOC 207)

China's post-1976 recovery from the late Mao era; its reorientation toward an open market-oriented economy; the consequences of this new model and runaway economic growth for standards of living, social life, inequality, and local governance; the political conflicts that have accompanied these changes.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 108: Political & Historical Sociology (SOC 208)

The differences between historical and sociological analysis of past events. The difference between constructing sociological explanations and describing past events. Topics include: the rise of Christianity, the mafia in a Sicilian village, the trade network of the East India Company.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 111: State and Society in Korea (INTNLREL 143, SOC 211)

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

SOC 112: Comparative Democratic Development (POLISCI 147)

Social, cultural, political, economic, and international factors affecting the development and consolidation of democracy in historical and comparative perspective. Individual country experiences with democracy, democratization, and regime performance. Emphasis is on the third wave of democratization over the past three decades and contemporary possibilities for democratic change. (Diamond)
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

SOC 114: Economic Sociology (SOC 214)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 115: Topics in Economic Sociology (SOC 315)

(Graduate students register for 315.) Discussion of topics initially explored in 114/214, with emphasis on countries and cultures outside N. America. Possible topics: families and ethnic groups in the economy, corporate governance and control, corporate strategy, relations among firms in industrial districts and business groups, the impact of national institutions and cultures on economic outcomes, transitions from state socialism and the role of the state in economic development. Possible case studies: the U.S., Germany, Italy, Britain, France, Brazil, Korea, India, Japan, and China. Prerequisite: 114/214 or 314.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
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